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View Full Version : Interesting photos of tree cabling in my yard


suedv
01-23-2007, 09:12 PM
I had a lot of work done on the oak trees in my yard today (oak trees need to be pruned when they are dormant in the winter to prevent disease spread from insects in the open wounds). The trees are more than 100 years old and they are about 110 to 120 feet high.

In addition to the typical pruning I had cables installed on a triple trunk tree (at the right side of the picture). You can see the vase shape of the three trunks as they get higher and become wider apart. When the wind picks up this tree really blows around. There was risk to major tree damage and major structural damage to our neighbor's house if it broke.

The cables connect the three trunks about 2/3 the way up the tree making a triangle so that when heavy wind blows the tree holds and moves together.

suedv
01-23-2007, 09:16 PM
Another shot to show the shape and size.

suedv
01-23-2007, 09:19 PM
Up toward the top and center of the picture you can see a guy climbing in the tree. Even though he had safety cable on, oh I would be Soooooo afraid.

suedv
01-23-2007, 09:21 PM
drilling a hole to put the cable through.

suedv
01-23-2007, 09:23 PM
I'm zoomed in on the guy who was climbing the tree. He is attaching a cable.

suedv
01-23-2007, 09:25 PM
He's tightening the bolt that went through the tree

suedv
01-23-2007, 09:28 PM
The cable is up and he is positioning himself to do the next one

suedv
01-23-2007, 09:33 PM
The work is all done. The cables blend in and all you see is a nice tree. I love my giant trees!!

Hoosier Bob
01-23-2007, 09:36 PM
Those are great shots Sue! Man I climbed as a kid but wow! Steven Wright: "I am not affraid of heights, I am affraid of widths!" You should offer the pics to the company. What great shots of their work. Nice job Sue and very cool to say the very least!:D

Farmer Ted
01-23-2007, 10:40 PM
I bet your neighborhood is the place to be on a hot sunny day!


Your pictures remind me of the street my mother lives on. In the summer it almost feels like you're driving down a tunnel because the trees from both sides of the street meet in the middle.

Workin' 4 Toys
01-24-2007, 09:21 AM
Sue, looks great.

chudson
01-24-2007, 09:42 AM
The cables connect the three trunks about 2/3 the way up the tree making a triangle so that when heavy wind blows the tree holds and moves together.

Way to go other wise it's "T-I-M-B-E-R" ,call the insurance man and maybe the ambulance!!!

Slinkyredfoot
01-24-2007, 09:58 AM
I saw a similar thing at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. There were 350 year old oaks ,they were huge, they actually attached copper cables to these trees to act as lightning rods to protect the trees from strikes. Good insurance to protect trees that big and beautiful. I really have never seen multiple trunk oaks like you have.
Did you also notice the Stihl boring drill the guy is using in the one pic. We sell those to arborists in Indy.

Workin' 4 Toys
01-24-2007, 10:01 AM
I saw a similar thing at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. There were 350 year old oaks ,they were huge, they actually attached copper cables to these trees to act as lightning rods to protect the trees from strikes. Good insurance to protect trees that big and beautiful. I really have never seen multiple trunk oaks like you have.
Did you also notice the Stihl boring drill the guy is using in the one pic. We sell those to arborists in Indy.
STIHL ROCKS....;)

suedv
01-24-2007, 10:29 AM
I saw a similar thing at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. There were 350 year old oaks ,they were huge, they actually attached copper cables to these trees to act as lightning rods to protect the trees from strikes. Good insurance to protect trees that big and beautiful. I really have never seen multiple trunk oaks like you have.
Did you also notice the Stihl boring drill the guy is using in the one pic. We sell those to arborists in Indy.


I have lightening protection on one of my trees. It is copper just as you described. They put it on the tallest tree in the yard. Someone actually climbed to the very top of the tree to put it on. It's supposed to protect the other trees around it because lightening will be attracted to that tree. I'll take a picture of the lightening protection and post. I put a lot of time and resources into my trees and yard.

I am very into landscaping, botany, soil science, and other related things in a hobby personal fascination kind of way. Some of it relates to the work I do, but mostly it is pure pleasure. It ranks up there maybe even higher than photography.

Workin' 4 Toys
01-24-2007, 10:39 AM
Ok, so does the "copper tree" have some type of warning sign..."Do not stand anywhere near this tree in case of lightning storm":rolleyes: ...:shocked:

You know like don't dump Hot coffee on yourself unless it says "contents HOT".....;)

suedv
01-24-2007, 10:45 AM
Ok, so does the "copper tree" have some type of warning sign..."Do not stand anywhere near this tree in case of lightning storm":rolleyes: ...:shocked:

You know like don't dump Hot coffee on yourself unless it says "contents HOT".....;)


Acutally once they get the copper down the tree they dig a trench and take the line about 10'-15' away from the tree and then drive a ground rod deep into the ground. Maybe you don't want to stand on that part of the lawn. :D

Workin' 4 Toys
01-24-2007, 10:51 AM
Acutally once they get the copper down the tree they dig a trench and take the line about 10'-15' away from the tree and then drive a ground rod deep into the ground. Maybe you don't want to stand on that part of the lawn. :D

And hope it's not touching the water line entering the house:shocked: .....


I learn something new everyday....:D

suedv
01-24-2007, 10:57 AM
Here is a link about lightening protection from the website of the tree company that I use to do all of my tree work. I use this company because if a company isn't good they can't touch my trees. :D Bartlett is highly professional and they do great work.

http://www.bartlett.com/post/articles/LIGHTNING_PROTECTION__NH12-99.pdf

Willski
01-24-2007, 11:08 AM
Pretty cool. I'm jealous because we bought a house about 4 years ago. People lived here for 9 years and never planted a single tree! What they had against shade I'll never know. I planted a few pin oaks, and a flowering pear. Gonna be awhile for some size.

milkmania
01-24-2007, 11:52 AM
suedv,

I've raised several silver maples from seeds.... they are about 20 feet tall now

but, I've noticed they're forked into several main trunks.

Should I trim all but the largest trunk?

The mother tree is at least 60 foot tall, and she's forked about 4 foot from the ground. She's been very stable the 14-15 years I've lived here.

you should see my 80' Pecan tree...... she's gorgeous!:love:
and she's very old, produced at least 4 babies

Slinkyredfoot
01-24-2007, 02:05 PM
[QUOTE=milkmania]suedv,

I've raised several silver maples from seeds.... they are about 20 feet tall now

but, I've noticed they're forked into several main trunks.

Should I trim all but the largest trunk?

The mother tree is at least 60 foot tall, and she's forked about 4 foot from the ground. She's been very stable the 14-15 years I've lived here.

you should see my 80' Pecan tree...... she's gorgeous!:love:
and she's very old, produced at least 4 babies[/QUOTE

I have the same situation, an arborist told me to just leave them alone. I have and they are still fine.

RexDog1
01-24-2007, 02:44 PM
Sue very cool photos
Do you have one of the trees in the fall?:cool:

suedv
01-24-2007, 02:53 PM
suedv,

I've raised several silver maples from seeds.... they are about 20 feet tall now

but, I've noticed they're forked into several main trunks.

Should I trim all but the largest trunk?

The mother tree is at least 60 foot tall, and she's forked about 4 foot from the ground. She's been very stable the 14-15 years I've lived here.

you should see my 80' Pecan tree...... she's gorgeous!:love:
and she's very old, produced at least 4 babies


I'd have to see the tree to say for certain, but I'm guessing by the time it is 20 feet tall it would be difficult to shape it into a single trunk tree. I'm editing this... it could probably be shaped to be a single trunk tree. However depending on how low the other trunks began it may not look great shape-wise to try to change it by the time it is 20 feet tall.

Silver Maples are fast growing trees with rather brittle branches that tend to get more heavily damaged than many varieties of trees by ice storms and high wind events. Multi-trunk silver maples sometimes require cabling to provide structural strength. Unless you are in a wide open place where large limb breakage isn't a big issue for nearby buildings, you may want to consider pulling silver maple seedlings when the come up and use a more durable tree for shade. As they get larger silver maples can be an expensive tree to maintain.

Slower growing maples are structurally stronger trees than the silver maples.

suedv
01-28-2007, 05:25 PM
Just remembered I was going to post a picture of lightning protection and never did. So here it is.