PDA

View Full Version : Flew the Cirrus SR22GTS Turbo!


MYMC
01-22-2007, 11:30 AM
What an airplane!

Saturday after a ton of meetings (including the planning meeting for “Carolinas Spring Madness!) and delivering boats the family and I headed down to the local FBO to see some friends and just hang out. On the way I received a call from the Cirrus aircraft rep saying that he had been given my name and number by a friend and wondered if I would be interested in flying a Cirrus airplane. I told him sure...sometime when he had time I’d take a look, why not? He asked what about today? He was in the plane now and could meet me at my FBO in about a 1/2 hour. I imagined the plane he would be bringing would be the SR20 (base model), when he said by the way “I'll be bringing the new SR22GTS Turbo I just picked up from the factory, it has only 8 hours on it!”

I arrived at the FBO with the family just as the plane turned base to final and landed on runway 02 and taxied over...all I could say was wow! The FBO emptied. She was painted in the new metallic silver paint and was loaded with every available option, what a beautiful airplane and it could be yours for about $562,000.00:eek:

After introductions some history of the company and the airplanes they build Carol (Cirrus sales guy) and I talk about some of my own "pre conceived notions" of Cirrus airplanes. Carol looks right at me and says rather than me try and explain why don't we let the bird do the talking...and we all climb aboard. After a pre flight briefing I am in the left seat Carol in right with Maeghan and Alex in back as we Taxi to Runway 02.

The SR22 Turbo takes off with 50% flaps and climbs like a rocket. The side mounted yoke took very little time to become accustomed to. The fact that the plane does not return to normal flight when released is hardest part...you must fly the plane back to level flight. In other words if you bank her over and release the control she'll stay banked over until you fly her back this is because the control surfaces are spring loaded. Further I have never flown a "glass panel" airplane and this took more time to become acquainted with than flying the plane. I can see that once you had this down your situational awareness would be much greater but it would take some time. Climb rate was 1000fpm and I took it to 12,500 before leveling off. Airspeed during the climb was 154knts and was197knts level with a 210kts gs...this plane hauls butt! The real performance is way up high but I did not want to mess with the O2 masks.

I put the plane in a 500fpm decent and came back down to 4000 feet so I could have Carol show me how the Cirrus acted when doing a "power off stall" having read and heard so much about this plane and its wings I had to see and feel it for myself...so with family on board we did it...several times. The plane mushes and then bobs but continues to fly. The ailerons still have authority, the fence works. I am told you can cross control yourself into trouble just like any airplane but you really need to screw up big...real big. And they (Cirrus) keep pointing out, there is the CAPS system (the parachute, credited with saving 14 lives I think so far). Wow, what joy to fly.

Back to the airport…time to stop dreaming. Carol landed the bird (this one is sold) and we taxi over, lots of questions from a busy FBO. Carol and I talked for a while and though he is a good salesman and it is a wonderful airplane I did explain that half a million dollars is just a tad out of range for a boat salesman…maybe someday when Maeghan gets out of law school? In the mean time I’ll look at used SR20s (same airframe w/smaller wing) and start working a little harder…funny how many different forms motivation comes in.

Mag_Red
01-22-2007, 11:39 AM
Nice write up Mike......but what??? NO PICS OF Maeghan???:D

MYMC
01-22-2007, 11:49 AM
Nice write up Mike......but what??? NO PICS OF Maeghan???:D
I didnt bring a camera! I was kicking myself the entire time.

'02xrider
01-22-2007, 11:52 AM
I must agree with Mag...you did mention Maeghan and there was no picture

Mag_Red
01-22-2007, 11:52 AM
I didnt bring a camera! I was kicking myself the entire time.yeah I bet! Sounds like a beautiful aircraft though. Tell em Maeghan will be their offical spokes person. All you require is, use of the plane, and of course all fuel and maintenance.;)

Mag_Red
01-22-2007, 11:54 AM
I must agree with Mag...you did mention Maeghan and there was no pictureSort of like the rules for polls. Start a poll......you need an UMP option. Mention Maeghan's name in a post.........must provide pictures:D

MYMC
01-22-2007, 11:56 AM
yeah I bet! Sounds like a beautiful aircraft though. Tell em Maeghan will be their offical spokes person. All you require is, use of the plane, and of course all fuel and maintenance.;)
Would you believe me if I told you we might be looking at something like this?

Mag_Red
01-22-2007, 11:59 AM
Would you believe me if I told you we might be looking at something like this?Not at all.....you're a smart fella. Did the plane look anything like this??

MYMC
01-22-2007, 12:16 PM
Not at all.....you're a smart fella. Did the plane look anything like this??
Yep only it was a silver signature edition with a black composite prop.

Maristar210
01-22-2007, 12:17 PM
Nice write up Mike. Thanks for posting, I enjoyed it.


Steve

Maristar210
01-22-2007, 12:22 PM
At Cirrus, we don't ignore the fundamentals of aviation design. We just give them an ingenious new interpretation. Because we are unfettered by the stale thinking of "that's the way it's always been done," we are building today what is arguably the best value in well-designed, technologically superior personal aircraft.

The CIRRUS SRV-G2 - Think flying is a bit too complicated for you to learn, or a little too expensive for your lifestyle? Think again. The SRV-G2 offers the exceptional design and performance equated with owning a CIRRUS, yet at a price that can make your dreams of flying a new reality. This entry-level airplane more than meets the needs of the customer who prefers to fly in daytime visual conditions, but does not want to compromise outstanding safety and comfort.

The CIRRUS SR20-G2 - Interested in a substantial airplane that remains practical and affordable? Whether you’re a non-pilot looking to begin flying lessons, a pilot needing personal transportation, or a fleet customer selecting the best plane to meet the demands of a multiple-aircraft operation, consider the SR20-G2.

The CIRRUS SR20-GTS - Go ahead — indulge yourself. The SR20-GTS provides entrylevel luxury into the world of CIRRUS, yet at a price that makes indulgence affordable. When friends, family and business associates experience the versatility, freedom, and sheer fun of flying in your CIRRUS they’ll see that your new lifestyle machine is truly a necessary luxury — because it maximizes the most precious commodity of all — time.

The CIRRUS SR22-G2 - For three years running, the CIRRUS SR22-G2 has been the world’s best-selling single engine four-seat airplane. Today, the SR22-G2 defines the new CIRRUS standard model. Why? We’d love to invite you to see for yourself by taking a ride in the new breed of airplane that has taken the aviation industry by storm.

The CIRRUS SR22-GTS - CIRRUS’ premium, luxury ride that has come to define CIRRUS aircraft as one of the world’s elite. Every dream option from supple leather seats to an exhilarating 310hp of performance and speed comes standard, giving new meaning to the phrase, ‘fully loaded.’ When flying the SR22-GTS, ‘getting there’ is truly more than half the fun.
SRV-G2 Base Price:
$199,000
Cruise Speed: 150 KTAS
Maximum Payload: 950 pounds
Maximum range cruise: 865 nm

SR20-G2 Base Price: $249,995
Cruise Speed: 156 KTAS
Maximum Payload: 930 pounds
Maximum range cruise: 882 nm

SR20-GTS Base Price: $334,995
Cruise Speed: 156 KTAS
Maximum Payload: 930 pounds
Maximum range cruise: 882 nm

SR22-G2 Base Price: $349,995
Cruise Speed: 185 KTAS
Maximum Payload: 1,150 pounds
Maximum range cruise: over 1,000 nm

SR22-GTS Base Price: $449,995
Cruise Speed: 185 KTAS
Maximum Payload: 1,150 pounds
Maximum range cruise: over 1,000 nm


* Cruise speed [8,000 feet] at 75% power

pq2
01-22-2007, 12:26 PM
Mike, you should start looking for the cancun airport and make some flight hours coming here, we are still waiting for you guys.

Maristar210
01-22-2007, 12:28 PM
http://www.cirrusdesign.com/turbogenius/pdf/se22_turbo_insert.pdf

MYMC
01-22-2007, 12:38 PM
You guys are killing me!
The pricing is right on...the reason this one was so expensive was because it was a signature edition (1 of 50) number 48. I should have taken picutres!

MYMC
01-22-2007, 12:40 PM
not that I've looked before
Have you flown one yet? If not...you should.;)

shepherd
01-22-2007, 12:45 PM
Mike, you lucky bustard.

What, you didn't try any spins or loop-de-loops? :cool:

shepherd
01-22-2007, 12:50 PM
The CIRRUS SRV-G2 - Think flying is a bit too complicated for you to learn, or a little too expensive for your lifestyle? Think again.
...
The CIRRUS SR20-G2 - Interested in a substantial airplane that remains practical and affordable?
...
The CIRRUS SR20-GTS - Go ahead — indulge yourself. The SR20-GTS provides entrylevel luxury into the world of CIRRUS, yet at a price that makes indulgence affordable.



Why can't I stop laughing? 8p :confused: 8p

I guess "affordable" and "expensive" are relative terms... :cool:

MYMC
01-22-2007, 12:53 PM
Mike, you lucky bustard.

What, you didn't try any spins or loop-de-loops? :cool:
She isn't rated for that stuff, and come to think about it neither am I! A to B transportation thats what I'm good at and it would appear that this airplane is way better at it than I am.

MYMC
01-22-2007, 12:56 PM
Why can't I stop laughing? 8p :confused: 8p

I guess "affordable" and "expensive" are relative terms... :cool:
Almost like they took a page from the MC marketing play book

shepherd
01-22-2007, 01:08 PM
Almost like they took a page from the MC marketing play book

I was thinking about that too, but one of those planes costs 4 to 5 times as much as a brand new MC. (and the plane has a smaller engine and I bet it doesn't have a cooler in the floor! ;) )

I still don't understand the airplane pricing game. It's why I gave up plane ownership for boat ownership. I'm not poor by any means, but the only way I'll be able to afford a plane that cruises more than 150 mph will probably be to build my own -- or inherit my father's RV6.

Maristar210
01-22-2007, 01:26 PM
You guys are killing me!
The pricing is right on...the reason this one was so expensive was because it was a signature edition (1 of 50) number 48. I should have taken picutres!


Mike,

I was not questioning the price. I was just throwing out some info. Most who fly probably already know this stuff but I enjoy reading it, especially the cruise ratings:D

I have seen the pic's of that silver one and you are correct sir...

It's bad ***

MYMC
01-22-2007, 01:46 PM
Mike,

I was not questioning the price. I was just throwing out some info. Most who fly probably already know this stuff but I enjoy reading it, especially the cruise ratings:D

I have seen the pic's of that silver one and you are correct sir...

It's bad ***
I wasnt questioning your post, I was making clear for the folks reading why the one I flew was so expensive.

Go fly one...even if you dont buy it...its nice to have it written in the log book!

Maristar210
01-22-2007, 02:32 PM
I wasnt questioning your post, I was making clear for the folks reading why the one I flew was so expensive.

Go fly one...even if you dont buy it...its nice to have it written in the log book!


I am afraid at this point I am an aspiring right seat passenger who has two friends who are instrument rated. Someday?

Steve

Danimal
01-22-2007, 02:44 PM
Here is a pic of the Silver Signature Edition -

flyingskibiker
01-22-2007, 02:46 PM
nice! funny, the Columbia website sounds the same... gotta love them new birds! i almost got a ride in the new Mooney. they were booked. *sniff*

Sodar
01-22-2007, 03:05 PM
Here is a pic of the Silver Signature Edition -

I know nothing about planes, but that thing is sweet!

WakePowell
01-22-2007, 03:07 PM
They had the Silver Signature Edition on display at Barrett-Jackson last week. Beautiful airplane I just wished the gear would retract….

Mag_Red
01-22-2007, 03:11 PM
Here is a pic of the Silver Signature Edition -Luv the Lambo doors! That plane is Pimp!:D

MYMC
01-22-2007, 03:14 PM
They had the Silver Signature Edition on display at Barrett-Jackson last week. Beautiful airplane I just wished the gear would retract….
I hear ya...but insurance is high enough!

Workin' 4 Toys
01-22-2007, 03:15 PM
half a million dollars is just a tad out of range for a boat salesman….
WHAT...You're a boat salesman too.....And all this time I just thought you were Maeghan's husband....8p

MYMC
01-22-2007, 03:15 PM
Here is a pic of the Silver Signature Edition -
That is her...funny but that black prop is way cool:cool:

phecksel
01-23-2007, 11:37 AM
I was thinking about that too, but one of those planes costs 4 to 5 times as much as a brand new MC. (and the plane has a smaller engine and I bet it doesn't have a cooler in the floor! ;) )

I still don't understand the airplane pricing game. It's why I gave up plane ownership for boat ownership. I'm not poor by any means, but the only way I'll be able to afford a plane that cruises more than 150 mph will probably be to build my own -- or inherit my father's RV6.

I don't know about brand spanking new planes, but used planes will tend to appreciate. In nine years my Mooney's value doubled. If you count all the associated expenses, it was still very expensive. Friend of mine challenged me one time with being rich, because I owned a plane. We sat down, and did a total cost comparison between the Mooney and his 30' cruiser. we assumed five year ownership, and while my initial costs were higher, the final total estimated costs were nearly identical. My true love was the water, and my house from he!! was eating me alive, at the same time the plane became a maintenance nightmare. It was a tough decision, and to a certain respect still regret the decision, but sold the plane, and bought the 197.

MYMC
01-24-2007, 11:05 AM
Sad to hear about a Mooney being sold.

phecksel
01-24-2007, 11:38 AM
Sad to hear about a Mooney being sold.

It gets worse...
The plane had been in the family since 1969, when I finally had to sell it in 2002. They guy I sold it to, crashed it, in a light cross wind. My read on the NTSB report, was he landed too hot, attempted to force it down, and didn't deal with the x-wind. One thing dad BEAT into my head, was never ever attempt to land the Mooney hot. She will decide when to land, and not one second sooner. I have 950+ hours, out of my 1,000 hours in that one airplane. We had a thing going, she always did what I was thinking, and if I did something really stupid, would always bail me out. Unfortunately, just before I sold, and what led to my decision to sell, had a rash of very expensive parts breaking. Final straw was a in cabin gasoline leak, right next to the radio stack. We had just taken off, my g/f (now wife) said, something dripping on my foot, I reached over, smelled that it was the source of the gas fumes, declared the emergency, while banking and lowering the gear to land downwind on the runway I just took off from. Came so close to not deliver it to the buyer. Literally almost turned around mid flight to find a way to make it work. To this day, still regret the sale. But also not willing to give up my lake house.

MYMC
01-24-2007, 11:49 AM
It gets worse...
The plane had been in the family since 1969, when I finally had to sell it in 2002. They guy I sold it to, crashed it, in a light cross wind. My read on the NTSB report, was he landed too hot, attempted to force it down, and didn't deal with the x-wind. One thing dad BEAT into my head, was never ever attempt to land the Mooney hot. She will decide when to land, and not one second sooner. I have 950+ hours, out of my 1,000 hours in that one airplane. We had a thing going, she always did what I was thinking, and if I did something really stupid, would always bail me out. Unfortunately, just before I sold, and what led to my decision to sell, had a rash of very expensive parts breaking. Final straw was a in cabin gasoline leak, right next to the radio stack. We had just taken off, my g/f (now wife) said, something dripping on my foot, I reached over, smelled that it was the source of the gas fumes, declared the emergency, while banking and lowering the gear to land downwind on the runway I just took off from. Came so close to not deliver it to the buyer. Literally almost turned around mid flight to find a way to make it work. To this day, still regret the sale. But also not willing to give up my lake house.
You're killing me...I've been down this path with cars but I don't think it is the same. Cars can touch you but they don't have the ability to hurt you as easily both physically and financially as an airplane...so when you find one that seems to be taking care of you she is tough to part with.

Never have flown a Mooney but like most low wing planes either you do it their way, go around or...well lets not talk about that one.:confused:

shepherd
01-24-2007, 02:23 PM
I don't know about brand spanking new planes, but used planes will tend to appreciate. In nine years my Mooney's value doubled.

Good point. Old planes do hold their value and the price of new airplanes is certainly a big reason for that. Bought my 1970 C172 for $14,500 back in '88. Sold it for the same price 3 years later -- with higher hours on the engine. New owner ended up needing an overhaul shortly afterwards.

If and when I buy another plane, it will mainly be for travelling purposes and not for just flying around the local area. I've had my share of "$100 hamburgers." IMO, for transportation, you need something that will cruise at least 150 mph to make it worthwhile. Otherwise, you might as well just drive or fly commercially. Unfortunately, those fast planes -- even the old ones -- are pretty expensive.

MYMC
01-24-2007, 02:48 PM
Shep,

I think a used SR20 would fit your mission...and if you don't need a glass panel there are some pretty decent deals to be had (good lord I'm turning into a Cirrus salesman :eek: )

phecksel
01-25-2007, 11:48 AM
Good point. Old planes do hold their value and the price of new airplanes is certainly a big reason for that. Bought my 1970 C172 for $14,500 back in '88. Sold it for the same price 3 years later -- with higher hours on the engine. New owner ended up needing an overhaul shortly afterwards.

If and when I buy another plane, it will mainly be for travelling purposes and not for just flying around the local area. I've had my share of "$100 hamburgers." IMO, for transportation, you need something that will cruise at least 150 mph to make it worthwhile. Otherwise, you might as well just drive or fly commercially. Unfortunately, those fast planes -- even the old ones -- are pretty expensive.
I was doing a lot of travel for business. Literally flying one significant round trip every week. Only had weather stop me once, and slow me down a handful of times. Currency was such that I probably could have passed the ATP flight exam. As my flying slowed due to not flying for work, and financial constraints due to divorce, it was scary to me how far the skills deteriorated. Went from doing low ifr "doughnut" approaches to, crap...this is a narrow course, LOL. What made selling the Mooney even harder, it was exceptionally fast. That particular model was typically a 140 kt plane. I would typically see 152-3 kts. I used to tease dad all the time about the fact we picked up 5 kts when I finally sprung for a new paint job. If he's known how much speed would have been added, he'd had it painted years before. But, because I paid for it, got to design the scheme. Although ex and mom talked me out of colors I wanted :( It was nothing for me to fly to NY for lunch, or chicago to shop, or even OSH for the day. SW FL was typically an 8 hr flight, although did it in as fast as 6 hours (should have made it non stop), to as long as 12 hours. I wouldn't want a plane unless it was at least 150+ kts. The 100 hamburgers, were usually nothing more then an opportunity to spend some time with friends. Loved to go on low IFR days, just for the fun of it. If it was a nice day, I'd be on the boat! Took a friend out one day who also had a mooney and was having trouble with approaches. It was 200-1/2 and I showed him how nicely the plane did, hands off. Don't think he ever got that through his thick skull, the airplane did a better job then he could. Think the only time I touched the yolk was immediately after putting the gear down, as the short fuselage mooney I had, tended to oscillate and required a slight amount of pressure to stop. Broke out at 200', perfectly lined up and only then did I actually grab the yoke.

If I were to buy a plane today, I would look at the Mooney 201, 252, or Rocket modified Mooney. Cirrus would be a close consideration. For the right price would consider {shudder} a bo. But, it's all a dream...

MYMC
01-25-2007, 12:21 PM
I was doing a lot of travel for business. Literally flying one significant round trip every week. Only had weather stop me once, and slow me down a handful of times. Currency was such that I probably could have passed the ATP flight exam. As my flying slowed due to not flying for work, and financial constraints due to divorce, it was scary to me how far the skills deteriorated. Went from doing low ifr "doughnut" approaches to, crap...this is a narrow course, LOL. What made selling the Mooney even harder, it was exceptionally fast. That particular model was typically a 140 kt plane. I would typically see 152-3 kts. I used to tease dad all the time about the fact we picked up 5 kts when I finally sprung for a new paint job. If he's known how much speed would have been added, he'd had it painted years before. But, because I paid for it, got to design the scheme. Although ex and mom talked me out of colors I wanted :( It was nothing for me to fly to NY for lunch, or chicago to shop, or even OSH for the day. SW FL was typically an 8 hr flight, although did it in as fast as 6 hours (should have made it non stop), to as long as 12 hours. I wouldn't want a plane unless it was at least 150+ kts. The 100 hamburgers, were usually nothing more then an opportunity to spend some time with friends. Loved to go on low IFR days, just for the fun of it. If it was a nice day, I'd be on the boat! Took a friend out one day who also had a mooney and was having trouble with approaches. It was 200-1/2 and I showed him how nicely the plane did, hands off. Don't think he ever got that through his thick skull, the airplane did a better job then he could. Think the only time I touched the yolk was immediately after putting the gear down, as the short fuselage mooney I had, tended to oscillate and required a slight amount of pressure to stop. Broke out at 200', perfectly lined up and only then did I actually grab the yoke.

If I were to buy a plane today, I would look at the Mooney 201, 252, or Rocket modified Mooney. Cirrus would be a close consideration. For the right price would consider {shudder} a bo. But, it's all a dream...

Cool stuff to read...working on low IRF stuff now.

rodltg2
01-25-2007, 12:36 PM
sold my cessna 172 for more than a paid for it. too bad i had to put in a new motor in :mad: . i dont think i'll ever buy a plane again unless i somehow become filthy rich. way too time consuming and expensive. if and when, the next one will be personal jet, and i definalty wont be the flying it.i'll be the one in the back drinkin beers.:D

Upper Michigan Prostar190
01-25-2007, 01:05 PM
sold my cessna 172 for more than a paid for it. too bad i had to put in a new motor in i dont think i'll ever buy a plane again unless i somehow become filthy rich. way too time consuming and expensive. if and when, the next one will be personal jet, and i definalty wont be the flying it.i'll be the one in the back drinkin beers.:D
Rod, you silly boy! if your in a jet like that, you dont drink beer, you drink fine champanya!:rolleyes: Geez gosh, dont you have any class? or are you just as bad as Hoosier?8p ;)

shepherd
01-25-2007, 01:29 PM
UMP, he probably meant he'd be drinking the expensive beers, like Heineken!

phecksel
01-26-2007, 12:39 PM
Cool stuff to read...working on low IRF stuff now.
Two tricks to low ifr...
Always be prepared to go to the alternate
Practice, practice, practice.

think I only had to do a second approach once, and it was only because I had forgotten to update the altimeter, and it was off enough to make me miss. Controller caught my alt and again gave me the current setting.

One flight was wild, the controller had created a tough situation, because I had gotten held up too high too long, was screaming down the initial approach course. He started to turn another plane on course in front of me, and realized the speed differential wasn't going to work. Had the other plane fly through the final course, while I'm still bleeding excess altitude and speed. When I had initially gotten the atis it was 400-3/4. 15 minutes later, tower advised me it had deteriorated to 250-1/2. I reported 200-1/2. Plane behind me made it. Nobody else got in that day. Strangest thing I had ever seen.

Here's a question for you... When are you allowed to fly down to 100-1/2 as a part 91 operator?

MYMC
01-26-2007, 12:49 PM
If you can see the rabbit but not the runway.

rodltg2
01-26-2007, 01:09 PM
Rod, you silly boy! if your in a jet like that, you dont drink beer, you drink fine champanya!:rolleyes: Geez gosh, dont you have any class? or are you just as bad as Hoosier?8p ;)


i dont like champagne, gives me headache..

MYMC
01-26-2007, 03:32 PM
Am I right? Oh and the VASI or PAPI in sight.

Carbon Dreams
01-26-2007, 03:46 PM
Two tricks to low ifr...
Always be prepared to go to the alternate
Practice, practice, practice.

think I only had to do a second approach once, and it was only because I had forgotten to update the altimeter, and it was off enough to make me miss. Controller caught my alt and again gave me the current setting.

One flight was wild, the controller had created a tough situation, because I had gotten held up too high too long, was screaming down the initial approach course. He started to turn another plane on course in front of me, and realized the speed differential wasn't going to work. Had the other plane fly through the final course, while I'm still bleeding excess altitude and speed. When I had initially gotten the atis it was 400-3/4. 15 minutes later, tower advised me it had deteriorated to 250-1/2. I reported 200-1/2. Plane behind me made it. Nobody else got in that day. Strangest thing I had ever seen.

Here's a question for you... When are you allowed to fly down to 100-1/2 as a part 91 operator?

Any time. You are Part 91.

Carbon Dreams
01-26-2007, 03:56 PM
Read the Reg.

14CFR91.175 Takeoff and landing under IFR.
(a) Instrument approaches to civil airports. Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator, when an instrument letdown to a civil airport is necessary, each person operating an aircraft, except a military aircraft of the United States, shall use a standard instrument approach procedure prescribed for the airport in part 97 of this chapter.

(b) Authorized DH or MDA. For the purpose of this section, when the approach procedure being used provides for and requires the use of a DH or MDA, the authorized DH or MDA is the highest of the following:

(1) The DH or MDA prescribed by the approach procedure.

(2) The DH or MDA prescribed for the pilot in command.

(3) The DH or MDA for which the aircraft is equipped.

(c) Operation below DH or MDA. Except as provided in paragraph (l) of this section, where a DH or MDA is applicable, no pilot may operate an aircraft, except a military aircraft of the United States, at any airport below the authorized MDA or continue an approach below the authorized DH unless—

(1) The aircraft is continuously in a position from which a descent to a landing on the intended runway can be made at a normal rate of descent using normal maneuvers, and for operations conducted under part 121 or part 135 unless that descent rate will allow touchdown to occur within the touchdown zone of the runway of intended landing;

(2) The flight visibility is not less than the visibility prescribed in the standard instrument approach being used; and

(3) Except for a Category II or Category III approach where any necessary visual reference requirements are specified by the Administrator, at least one of the following visual references for the intended runway is distinctly visible and identifiable to the pilot:

(i) The approach light system, except that the pilot may not descend below 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation using the approach lights as a reference unless the red terminating bars or the red side row bars are also distinctly visible and identifiable.

(ii) The threshold.

(iii) The threshold markings.

(iv) The threshold lights.

(v) The runway end identifier lights.

(vi) The visual approach slope indicator.

(vii) The touchdown zone or touchdown zone markings.

(viii) The touchdown zone lights.

(ix) The runway or runway markings.

(x) The runway lights.

MYMC
01-26-2007, 06:14 PM
Anyone can answer with a copy of the FAR/AIM or by copy pasting it...I think the purpose of the quiz was to test if I knew it off the top of my head...since I didn't sight the entire FAR/AIM 2007 I assume I failed.:( Feels alot like an FAA exam, only without the option of mutiple choices.

phecksel
01-26-2007, 07:07 PM
Am I right? Oh and the VASI or PAPI in sight.
The answer I was looking for was the approach lights. If you see the VASI or PAPI, etc, you can land. You would be surprised at how many people get that question wrong. I've never landed (or even shot an approach) with less then 200', but took off one day with 50' ceiling. Watched a freighter pilot come out of the clag in a pretty steep bank.

Carbon Dreams
01-26-2007, 09:01 PM
Anyone can answer with a copy of the FAR/AIM or by copy pasting it...I think the purpose of the quiz was to test if I knew it off the top of my head...since I didn't sight the entire FAR/AIM 2007 I assume I failed.:( Feels alot like an FAA exam, only without the option of mutiple choices.

Certainly not a fail. Just remember that we are governed by the regs. Proper reading of these will serve you well throughout your flying career. It's not just knowing the multiple choice answer, but understanding where the answer came from.

MYMC
01-27-2007, 08:36 AM
Certainly not a fail. Just remember that we are governed by the regs. Proper reading of these will serve you well throughout your flying career. It's not just knowing the multiple choice answer, but understanding where the answer came from.
copy that, wilco