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View Full Version : Got my Eyes done 2 days ago anyone else??


pram
12-29-2006, 10:25 PM
I finally got something done that I have wanted to get done for a long time Laser Eye Sugery. I have worn glasses for as long as I can remember (5 or 6 years old) then moved onto contacts when I was about 16. I had a strong prescription (-6.75) so without glasses or contacts I couldn't do anything. Now at 36 I went and had it done. So far I am seeing about 95%. It is better in the morning and gets progessively worse as the day goes on. I am really looking forward to being able to swim underwater with my eyes open. Anyone esle had this done or thinking about having it done?

betsy&david Harrison
12-29-2006, 10:38 PM
I finally got something done that I have wanted to get done for a long time Laser Eye Sugery. I have worn glasses for as long as I can remember (5 or 6 years old) then moved onto contacts when I was about 16. I had a strong prescription (-6.75) so without glasses or contacts I couldn't do anything. Now at 36 I went and had it done. So far I am seeing about 95%. It is better in the morning and gets progessively worse as the day goes on. I am really looking forward to being able to swim underwater with my eyes open. Anyone esle had this done or thinking about having it done?
Sheee ooot, I thought you were talking about having eyeliner tatooted on you lids...

milkmania
12-29-2006, 10:51 PM
I finally got something done that I have wanted to get done for a long time Laser Eye Sugery. I have worn glasses for as long as I can remember (5 or 6 years old) then moved onto contacts when I was about 16. I had a strong prescription (-6.75) so without glasses or contacts I couldn't do anything. Now at 36 I went and had it done. So far I am seeing about 95%. It is better in the morning and gets progessively worse as the day goes on. I am really looking forward to being able to swim underwater with my eyes open. Anyone esle had this done or thinking about having it done?

congratulations

I hope it gets better, since it's only been two days.

myself, I've been very fortunate with my eyes....
when we were in the examining room for my daughter'sknee injury, the doctor was amazed that I could read the report on his computer screen from 15 feet away.

was sitting there, and he said come here, and read this.
I said I could read it from here, he said No Way!

read it word for word:D

Leroy
12-29-2006, 11:05 PM
Love you Betsy!

I want to have it done. Remember at 40 your eyes will change. My prescription was constant from 18 until ~40 and then bang it changed and now has been constant again. I use 5.5 but should use 6.25. However at 6.25 I need reading glasses so I compromise a bit of distance to be able to read.

Sheee ooot, I thought you were talking about having eyeliner tatooted on you lids...

TMCNo1
12-29-2006, 11:26 PM
Somewhat related, but I got my prescription computer glasses this evening from W-M EyeCare Center, only took 3 days and they put them lens in a perfect pair of frames I had. I have worn glasses for only 8 years and have bifocals. These new computer glasses are amazing. I don't have to use only the bifocal (bottom) lens to read the screen as I have done for the last year. I now can see everything within 5' of the screen and the screen with no transition and sit in the chair as I am suppose to, but you can't walk around with them on.

prambold, I'm glad to hear you are doing well with the surgery!

pram
12-30-2006, 12:09 AM
Remember at 40 your eyes will change.

The place that I had it done at gives a life time guarantee that if you ever need to have them recorrected they will do it free of charge. I figure that even if I am starting over and one day have to wear glasses again that they will be of a minimum strength. I had th PRK surgery done and I shouldn't be this far along with vision recovery so I am ahead of the game.

Leroy
12-30-2006, 12:13 AM
I'm probably past this, but that's great to know! I'm ready to do this. Really hate worrying about water washing out contacts, etc.


The place that I had it done at gives a life time guarantee that if you ever need to have them recorrected they will do it free of charge. I figure that even if I am starting over and one day have to wear glasses again that they will be of a minimum strength. I had th PRK surgery done and I shouldn't be this far along with vision recovery so I am ahead of the game.

pram
12-30-2006, 02:03 AM
Sheee ooot, I thought you were talking about having eyeliner tatooted on you lids...

No no no but I have heard of such things LOL

mitch
12-30-2006, 08:34 AM
Glad it worked for you. Have been thinking about it for years,. Have been steady at -2.00 for many years, but will be needing bi-focals soone enough, so decided to not do it, as I'd be trading one pair of glasses for another.....

JohnnyB
12-30-2006, 09:25 AM
Contemplating having it done. My eyesight and age are very similar to yours.

I've been wearing contacts since i was 18 and have become very proficient at skiing and footing without losing them. However, on the slalom, the spray tends to wash them around in my eyes.....as I'm typing this, I'm remembering how bad i wanted this done last August....maybe its time to make an appointment.

peason
12-30-2006, 09:28 AM
As a gift from me, my wife had laser done 3+ years ago. She wore a strong prescription ever since 3rd grade. She thanks me every day! She has had zero problems and loves being able to swim, waterski and wear sunglasses with out having to think about having contacts. Congrats you are going to love it. I would reccomend this surgery to anyone after the great success my wife has had.

SkiDog
12-30-2006, 10:06 AM
I had mine done 6,7,8 years ago, I can't remember, but all I gotta say is, Thats the BEST $4500.00 that I EVER spent in my life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I hated wearing glasses ands was not about to take on the everyday crap of putting contacts in. Fortunitly, I was a good candidate. The long part of htis story in a short version, is I had had R.K surgury done in one eye, and before I could get back to get the other one done, my doctor was killed! So I went with one good eye and one not so good eye for about two years before I had the Lasik done. Actually, I was surprised that they would even do it, but I guess I got lucky. To this day, my vision is still 20-20. I have to wear reading glasses when reading a newspaper or a reaturant menu if there's not much light in the room. But I'll take that any day over wearing glasses all the time!:) :) :)

bigmac
12-30-2006, 10:19 AM
I had radial keratoplasty done about 10 years ago. To this day my distance vision is about 20/15, although as I age I note that I do need progressively stronger reading glasses. That's a consequence of aging that would have happened even without the refractive surgery, except that I would have needed expensive bifocals instead of just generic reading glasses that I can buy at Sam's Club at 4 for $15.

Refractive surgery is a life-changing event, especially for someone who wears goggles, helmets, scuba masks. Paintball masks were particularly problematic due to fogging. The best part for me was that my ophthalmologist is a good friend and didn't charge me (he bartered for a free colonoscopy;)

SkiDog
12-30-2006, 10:22 AM
I had radial keratoplasty done about 10 years ago. To this day my distance vision is about 20/15, although as I age I note that I do need progressively stronger reading glasses. That's a consequence of aging that would have happened even without the refractive surgery, except that I would have needed expensive bifocals instead of just generic reading glasses that I can buy at Sam's Club at 4 for $15.

Refractive surgery is a life-changing event, especially for someone who wears goggles, helmets, scuba masks. Paintball masks were particularly problematic due to fogging. The best part for me was that my ophthalmologist is a good friend and didn't charge me (he bartered for a free colonoscopy;)

Damn BIGMAC, I'm impressed! Oh I forgot, there's spellcheck! Just kidding man, Have a great day!:D :D :D

trickskier
12-30-2006, 10:26 AM
The best part for me was that my ophthalmologist is a good friend and didn't charge me (he bartered for a free colonoscopy;)

Sounds like you got the better end of the deal! :D

bigmac
12-30-2006, 10:47 AM
Sounds like you got the better end of the deal! :D

In general, there's no question which end of the colonoscope I prefer.

Ron Grover
12-31-2006, 01:24 PM
Bigmac,

I know the feeling. It has been great.

Had RK surgery done in 1982. I was one of the first 500 in the nation to have it done. It was still very much in test phase at that time. At that time they would only do one eye because they had no idea of the long term effects and as the doctor said if something unknown happens you always have one eye to correct. Had to keep going back to doc for a long time probably 5 years, because they were studying the effects.

At the time I have 20/400 eyesight. Wore "coke bottle" glasses. The day after surgery I was at 20/30 and at my one week check it was 20/20 in my left eye. Right eye was still 20/400. It took about one month for brain to compensate for sight in one eye but I still have never had to have the right eye corrected.

About 1 year ago age started catching up to me in corrected eye and I started using a very slight contact in that eye. Still have no trouble reading because if left eye can't read it due to naturally shortened arms, (as you guys 50 and 0ver know) I just hold it closer and read it with my right eye. Wife is always searching for her reading glasses, she is 2 years younger than me. I tease her about hoping I never get as old as her.

As far as skiing, it was wonderful. Before the surgery without glasses I couldn't even see the ball. Slalom was all about rythym. Couldn't see the next ball until I crossed the wake. I tried skiing with glasses. Taped floats to them and everything. As far as I know there are still prescriptions at the bottom of lake.

With only one eye that has vision depth perception can be an issue, mainly playing the outfield. Can't tell if it's in front of me or over my head. But everything else it is pretty easy to adjust.

André
12-31-2006, 02:04 PM
Ron
Why don't you have the other eye done now?

bigmac
12-31-2006, 02:09 PM
When I had my RK, they had just started doing both eyes at the same time so I went for that. I was only about -3.00 diopters (maybe about 20/60 - 20/80) before surgery, but I still needed glasses for driving. It's been great.

Ron Grover
01-01-2007, 11:57 AM
so use to having only one eye good why go through the pain and expense. plus the idea of never needing reading glasses is appealing.

bigmac
01-01-2007, 12:27 PM
Aging eyesight (presbyopia) and its decreasing ability for the lens to accomodate at closer focal distances is obviously a problem and monovision techniques with contacts and now refractive surgery have been commonly used. The solution has been to leave one eye slightly undercorrected during refractive surgery. Today, during LASIK on a 40 year-old, they might leave the non-dominant eye at -1.00 or -2.00 diopters or thereabouts. It's unlikely they'd leave it at 20/400 because many people's brains just can't process that disparity, but it works for you and I certainly wouldn't mess around with it if you're satisfied.

It won't be long that surgery to relieve presbyopia will be commonplace. It's the Next Big Thing in ophthalmology.

André
01-01-2007, 12:28 PM
so use to having only one eye good why go through the pain and expense. plus the idea of never needing reading glasses is appealing.
Is there still pain when having that operation in 2007?

bigmac
01-01-2007, 01:08 PM
Is there still pain when having that operation in 2007?

2007 is only about 12 hours old - it's too early to tell :D

Speaking to 2006 and earlier, it feels like a small grain of sand in each eye for about 36 hours. No big deal IMHO. When I had mine done, I left the hospital and my wife and I went shopping for my first pair of non-prescription sunglasses ever, then to a movie. It was absolutely no big deal for me.

I had radial keratoplasty where they make several radial incisions in the cornea with a knife in order to reshape it. Generally that hurts a lot more than LASIK. PRK is yet another excimer laser ablative technique - it tends to be used mostly in patients with corneas that are too thin for LASIK. That hurts a little more than radial keratoplasty.

In order to stir up a little controversy, let me observe that there have been at least a few studies that indicate that there is a link between near-sightedness and intelligence. Near-sighted people score, on average, 7 points higher on virtually all of the accepted intelligence tests and have higher educational levels (statistically significant). I'm therefore embarrassed that I was only a little near-sighted...:D

New York Times article (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?sec=health&res=940DE5DB1439F933A15751C1A96E948260)
Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myopia)
Human Genetics journal article (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3417304&dopt=Abstract)
Bunch of other stuff via Google
(http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=myopia+intelligence&btnG=Search)

bigmac
01-01-2007, 01:37 PM
..............dup

phecksel
01-01-2007, 01:59 PM
I had radial K done a lot of years ago...thinking 86ish? First eye healed a bit faster then expected and ended up 20-40(?). Second eye was 20-25. Had it done, not only for the advantage of eliminating glasses, but tired of the continuously worsening vision. I was at the RK limit, and for the most part, successful. Biggest problem I notice, is the change from morning to night. I still wear glasses, partially because the 20-40 slipped a bit more, and mostly for reading.

DrNautica
01-01-2007, 02:21 PM
Big Mac,

I am 43 and have worn glasses due to myopia since jr. high school (probably needed them earlier.) I began wearing hard contacts at about 16 and transitioned to gas permeable lenses a few years later. One year ago, I changed to soft disposable contacts but have been seriously underwhelmed with the vision results compared to the old gas perms. (The doc had me out of contacts altogether for about 60 days before writing a scrip for the soft lenses to give my eyes a chance to return to their normal shape due to the gas perm imprinting.) My current soft lens prescription is: Left - -2.25 -2.75 x 170 right - -2.25 -1.75 x020 and has been redone twice in the past year.

Recently, due to not being totally satisfied with the soft lens acuity, I have seriously contemplated corrective surgery. I am in the Columbus, Ohio area and would like your opinion on how to go about selecting a good surgeon. I am quite skepical of the "$300 an eye" guys so those are definitely out of the equation but how should I narrow the field of what's left since there seem to be so many options?

I do know several people who have had good reults but am still skeptical of choosing a doctor based on what someone else's opinion. Do you know if there is a national registry or something similar that tracks results and, perhaps more importantly, complaints?

Thanks,
Dr. N

bigmac
01-01-2007, 03:19 PM
I do know several people who have had good reults but am still skeptical of choosing a doctor based on what someone else's opinion. Do you know if there is a national registry or something similar that tracks results and, perhaps more importantly, complaints?


Unfortunately, such registries tracking results for various doctors doesn't exist. Outcome tracking for almost everything in medicine is coming, but is still likely a long way off.

I'd recommend asking your optometrist, preferably an independant optometrist in your area - they are most likely to have the best handle on relative skills of various ophthalmologists. Next would be finding an OR nurse somewhere and asking about the ophthalmologists they work with - a skillful ophthalmic surgeon is likely to also be skilled at LASIK. Next would be checking with various ophthalmologist offices that do LASIK and finding out how many refractive operations they've done - generally, they more they've done the better they are likely to be. If and when you do find an ophthalmologist, look him up on your state's Board of Medical Practice and review any board discliplinary actions he or she may have on their record. That doesn't necessarily assure quality or lack thereof, but it's always useful information.

LASIK, like any non-insurance covered procedure is a highly competitive market, so relative costs aren't necessarily a good indicator of quality. If the surgeon has a good reputation, has done a lot, and has state-of-the-art equipment, he's likely to be pretty good. The technical skills aren't that demanding since modern LASIK equipment is highly automated, but like any such thing it does demand a thorough understanding of the procedure, the equipment, and the computations necessary for optimal results.

If I run into my ophthalmologist buddy anytime soon, I'll ask him about refractive surgeons in the Lexington-Louisville-Cincinnatti area. He's pretty well-connected nationally and may know someone.

Blair
01-01-2007, 08:53 PM
2007 is only about 12 hours old - it's too early to tell :D

Speaking to 2006 and earlier, it feels like a small grain of sand in each eye for about 36 hours. No big deal IMHO. When I had mine done, I left the hospital and my wife and I went shopping for my first pair of non-prescription sunglasses ever, then to a movie. It was absolutely no big deal for me.

I had radial keratoplasty where they make several radial incisions in the cornea with a knife in order to reshape it. Generally that hurts a lot more than LASIK. PRK is yet another excimer laser ablative technique - it tends to be used mostly in patients with corneas that are too thin for LASIK. That hurts a little more than radial keratoplasty.

In order to stir up a little controversy, let me observe that there have been at least a few studies that indicate that there is a link between near-sightedness and intelligence. Near-sighted people score, on average, 7 points higher on virtually all of the accepted intelligence tests and have higher educational levels (statistically significant). I'm therefore embarrassed that I was only a little near-sighted...:D

New York Times article (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?sec=health&res=940DE5DB1439F933A15751C1A96E948260)
Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myopia)
Human Genetics journal article (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3417304&dopt=Abstract)
Bunch of other stuff via Google
(http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=myopia+intelligence&btnG=Search)

thanks big mac... thats good to hear... im near sighted (about -4.5)

and i am interested in possably getting this sort of a procedure done once i have graduated from school

Workin' 4 Toys
01-02-2007, 09:49 AM
In general, there's no question which end of the colonoscope I prefer.
In general, I'd prefer to be no where near either end......:D

Workin' 4 Toys
01-02-2007, 09:56 AM
My wife had hers done.
The first time was maybe 10-12 years ago. They only did one eye at a time 6 months a part, And required an eye patch be worn for (I think) 2 days and apply drops every few hours. 6 months later she had the other one done. If I recall it was about $5000.00 to have them done at the time. 5 years later she had them done again. Another $2000.00 this time but did both in one trip and no longer required the eye patch.

The thing I recall the most of her comments was she said she could "taste" the eye drops they gave her and it was the worst part. Other than the smell of her eyes burning during the procedure the first time...:eek:

bigmac
01-02-2007, 10:31 AM
My wife had hers done.
The first time was maybe 10-12 years ago. They only did one eye at a time 6 months a part, And required an eye patch be worn for (I think) 2 days and apply drops every few hours. 6 months later she had the other one done. If I recall it was about $5000.00 to have them done at the time. 5 years later she had them done again. Another $2000.00 this time but did both in one trip and no longer required the eye patch.

The thing I recall the most of her comments was she said she could "taste" the eye drops they gave her and it was the worst part. Other than the smell of her eyes burning during the procedure the first time...:eek:Boy, that's a lot of money. My ophthalmologist charged $2500 10-12 years ago.

The vast majority of refractive surgeons include subsequent reoperations ("enhancements") in the original price, as many as it takes to get the optimal result. Overcorrection is a serious problem because if they overcorrect to hyperopia (far-sighted) there is no good way of getting back. As a result, most surgeons will be conservative if there's a question, preferring to do a second operation to get to 20/20 rather than risk overcorrecting.

She could taste the drops because they were draining back to the pharynx via the tear ducts.

Workin' 4 Toys
01-02-2007, 10:39 AM
Boy, that's a lot of money. My ophthalmologist charged $2500 10-12 years ago.

The vast majority of refractive surgeons include subsequent reoperations ("enhancements") in the original price, as many as it takes to get the optimal result. Overcorrection is a serious problem because if they overcorrect to hyperopia (far-sighted) there is no good way of getting back. As a result, most surgeons will be conservative if there's a question, preferring to do a second operation to get to 20/20 rather than risk overcorrecting.

She could taste the drops because they were draining back to the pharynx via the tear ducts.
I knew why she had the "taste", I was pointing out she thought that was the worst part. So all in all not too bad I guess.
I do believe it was $2500 per eye the first time....

Harvey
01-02-2007, 11:27 AM
I had Lasik done almost 5 years ago and it was the best thing I ever did. I still have 20/20 vision although my night vision has decreased from what it once was. When I had it done I had the sand in my ears feeling for about 6 or 8 hours and light sensitivity for about 12-15 hours but otherwise it was great. I was up watching TV and playing playstation after 6 hours. Trying to convince the fiance to have it done in the future.

jbfootin
01-02-2007, 11:58 AM
I had Lasik done over 5 years ago and I still have better than 20-20. I was very blind and wore contacts or glasses since I was 6 yrs old. I would have the surgery again in a heartbeat.

Much like a MasterCraft..expensive, but worth it!:)

André
01-02-2007, 12:58 PM
When I had it done I had the sand in my ears feeling ...
;) :D ;) .....

pram
01-02-2007, 01:47 PM
Well it's been almost 6 days since I had it done and I couldn't be happier. I had the PRK surgery as opposed to Lasic done and although the results aren't as fast, there are way less restrictions sooner with the PRK. I felt absolutely no discomfort at all (not even the sand in my ears ;) sorry Harvey I couldn't resist and André started it :D ).

The clinic provided me with pain relief drops, sleeping aids and really dark sunglasses, I never needed any of it. I get the temporary contacts out today after work (they were put in to protect the eye where the epithelium was removed). I am hoping that by removing the contacts it will be the final step for my eyes to be more or less complete.

Like W4T said the taste of the drops is probably one of the worst parts of the entire episode. And it doesn't seem to matter what you do to rinse your mouth out it doesn't help, well whiskey helped a bit with the taste and surprisingly it seemed to get easier to deal with after each drink.