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richardsoncd
12-20-2006, 05:37 PM
So I recently moved to Atlanta, took a new job, etc. etc.

Here is the problem, the new job isn't what I expected and I feel I was somewhat mislead in the interview process and also I realize it really isn't a very good fit. I am in the AE (architecture / engineering) field and have been told most firms understand issues like this. One huge problem is the new company is very disorganized and run poorly. My problem is that I don't want to look like a "flight risk" to other employers, this is my third job out of school, my first was a little less than a year and a half and my last was just under 3 years. I want to stay in Atlanta (to get married) and want to find a job I can stay at and be successful and I don't feel this one is it. Should I just suck it up and make it through a year? or more? or is it cool if I am honest with other companies in the interview process, or do I just leave this job off my resume (which I feel is unethical....now that I say that...that isn't an option for me)...

Thanks fellas.

-Richardsoncd
aka Chuck

Monte
12-20-2006, 06:43 PM
My suggestion would be to keep the job you have, get your resume ready, and start sending it out to some head hunters. I think leaving before you have another job will look worse because there will be a gap in employment to explain. Keeping this job no matter how much you dislike it at least assures a paycheck while you wait for a better opportunity!

BrianM
12-20-2006, 06:46 PM
I say you go ahead and look for a job now and just be upfront when asked why you are looking to make a move so soon. "It isn't a good fit for me" is a perfectly good explanation can put a little positive spin on it to the next prospective employer. Just don't go in saying, "it wasn't a good fit because the company was poorly organized and run by a bunch of monkeys"

Oh and as said above keep your current job while looking.

Sodar
12-20-2006, 07:04 PM
I was in the same situation a few months ago... unfortunately I had to bite the bullet a little harder than I would have liked to, but life is all about compramise!! I went to work for a residential home developer straight out of school. Company was horrible... I think my 3rd grade kickball team had more organization than them! The only benefit was that I was working close to home and near the beach. Well, I decided in October, after 4 months of working there that I could not take it anymore. So, I quit Oct. 1st, interviewed at a commercial developer on Oct. 5th and started working there on Oct. 16th... only downfall is that the new job is about a 2 hour commute from home and in Los Angeles (MY PERSONAL VERSION OF HELL). Anyways, if you can tough it out for just a few weeks, go on as many interviews as you can and have a job lined up... if that does not work out and you can not take it anymore, then sack up and quit!

Bruce
12-20-2006, 07:12 PM
I fully agree with Brian. However be ready to define "fit".A verse of "bring in the clowns" won't do it.

roddydog
12-20-2006, 07:13 PM
As far as I am concerned, honesty is always a good quality in a person. Stay there but look around, if your res. is good and a potential employer asks why, tell them but without slammin' your current employer.
I'm sure you won't have a problem.

Maristar210
12-20-2006, 07:25 PM
I would only say life is too short to work in a job you hate or for a company you do not respect. What will happen eventually is your situation will change your demeanor and it WILL affect your personal life.

Get out, respectfully and professionally, but get out.

Slinkyredfoot
12-20-2006, 07:35 PM
My suggestion would be to keep the job you have, get your resume ready, and start sending it out to some head hunters. I think leaving before you have another job will look worse because there will be a gap in employment to explain. Keeping this job no matter how much you dislike it at least assures a paycheck while you wait for a better opportunity!

Very good logic and common sense, I agree

06' X-2 R8R H8R
12-20-2006, 08:12 PM
My dad always told me never quit your job until you have another one lined up or allready hired....(food for thought)

jeverett
12-20-2006, 08:32 PM
I fully agree with Brian. However be ready to define "fit".A verse of "bring in the clowns" won't do it.


That is too funny:uglyhamme the term "fit" is usually reserved for employers who want to get rid of you and don't want to get sued, but keep in mind the term doesn't work in reverse (i.e. in a job interview). I agree with most keep the job while you look for a new one, and look at it this way at least you get to collect a pay check from the clowns anyway. The only way it really works to cut loose is a total career change, ouch.

dapicatti
12-20-2006, 11:45 PM
That is too funny:uglyhamme the term "fit" is usually reserved for employers who want to get rid of you and don't want to get sued, but keep in mind the term doesn't work in reverse (i.e. in a job interview). I agree with most keep the job while you look for a new one, and look at it this way at least you get to collect a pay check from the clowns anyway. The only way it really works to cut loose is a total career change, ouch.

Just fired an employee within their first 90 days for not being a "good cultural fit". I think I would not appreciate learning that someone thinks they aren't a good fit this early in their career with a new company.

My two cents, stick it out at least 6 months, suck it up and get that resume out there. Last thing you want to look like is a "job jumper".

Monte
12-21-2006, 12:49 AM
Forgot to mention earlier watch the head hunters wilst you do all this... They can help a TON, but remember do what's good for you. they get a percentage.....

PendO
12-21-2006, 01:18 AM
I'll put up with monkeys if they pay me enough.

Leroy
12-21-2006, 08:53 AM
Chuck;

Maybe you have already done this, but ask yourself tHe hard questions:
Were you mislead or did you mislead yourself?
Don't know the nature of the disconnect, but are your expectations in line with your experience?
THere is often adjustment for a new person at a new company. Have a discussion with your manager for what you thought you were getting from the interview and see what can be done. Often disfunctional teams are really one good person from being top notch.

If it really is a bad fit keep the job but start looking!

Sodar
12-21-2006, 09:22 AM
Often disfunctional teams are really one good person from being top notch.
That is a killer point Leroy! One of those dare to be great scenarios! I guess if you really think about it, one could become the golden boy in a disfunctional setting much more easily, than in an already great setting... Just a little food for thought! :rolleyes:

Bruce
12-21-2006, 12:52 PM
Leroy. Now you've gone and done it. You have injected common sense and logic. That should really confuse the issue! (good job).
Back in my corporate days there were times I wanted to say to the person being interviewed "The awareness of your greatness should be the key to your humility"

Leroy
12-21-2006, 01:13 PM
I normally just add half truths and confusion..... :D

richardsoncd
12-21-2006, 04:38 PM
Chuck;

Maybe you have already done this, but ask yourself tHe hard questions:
Were you mislead or did you mislead yourself?
Don't know the nature of the disconnect, but are your expectations in line with your experience?
THere is often adjustment for a new person at a new company. Have a discussion with your manager for what you thought you were getting from the interview and see what can be done. Often disfunctional teams are really one good person from being top notch.

If it really is a bad fit keep the job but start looking!

Great advice, and I did look internally..some of my issues deal with ethics, other organizational structures and cultures, I would never leave a job in a dishonest way or for that matter with out another one in the hole. Honesty is key to my work ethic. I just don't want to look (on paper) like someone who jumps from job to job. Thanks for the input, I will most definitely approach the owner at some point before any decisions are made.

Thanks again

playtherapy
12-21-2006, 05:27 PM
I would keep the current job and look for another. Then you can go to the boss and tell him that you have been offered and accepted another position that is too good to pass up.

boatwake
12-21-2006, 11:12 PM
If you plan to stay in the Atlanta market be VERY careful jumping around too much. There are obviously limited employers in any field. It is amazing how many times your path will cross with co-workers from previous employers. Hiring managers will always consult these individuals for what they remember about you. Trust me, someone that only stayed a couple months would be memorable and not in a good way! I would suggest that you stick it out at least a year. This should give you time to prove what you are capable of and hopefully leave a positive impression with everyone that might remember you should your paths cross again. Good luck.

richardsoncd
01-25-2007, 09:46 AM
So I did switch companies this month, after the "old" company didn't make payroll on time....again. The new firm was very understanding and from my resume felt that I was not a risk. This firm is going to be awesome, a lot of growth potential and good people. I have recently found out that the "old" company has had issues with the "accounting staff" as well as some pending lawsuits therefore I feel justified in my actions and timing. On a related issue, I would like everyone to know what a great guy TrickSkier is and what an asset a person like this is to this site. I would also like to thank him for his help in this process even though we have never met.

Monte
01-25-2007, 10:44 AM
There are a lot of good folks around here, that will bend over backwards to help you, even though you've never met them! Look at what Rex did for rod's 7hr away boat... Congrats on the new position!!!