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Kevin 89MC
12-19-2006, 06:04 PM
Our club has a private lake (it's really an old quarry) that we use. It is great from many perspectives (like no other boats), but one it suffers in is bounce-back. The best shoreline for the course with respect to the wind is essentially a cliff wall for about half the length. Predictibly, there is major wake bounceback. We go down & back, then have to wait awhile to go again. We have done some experimenting, mainly draintile (4" perforated flexible pipe), filled with insulation, secured a few feet from the wall. It worked a little bit, but not really enough to do too much. We've thought of using plastic construction fence, the stuff with holes in it. I've thought about somehow placing some sheets of something a few feet from the wall, half in the water & half out, at an angle to mimic a gradual shoreline, but that might be quite expensive & time consuming.
Just wondering if anyone has some experience or thoughts in minimizing (or eliminating) the wake bounce-back.

Still thinking of waterskiing up here in the frozen tundra . . . no snow yet to play in :(

Thanks,
Kevin

Rich_G
12-19-2006, 06:13 PM
What about the lane dividers in an olympic swimming pool? The good ones are designed with baffles to kill waves. Check with the local college or YMCA. They change them out every other year or so and could make you a deal on the old ones.

rodltg2
12-19-2006, 06:46 PM
you could also try logs , but 900 ft of them would be tough! let mw know if i can ski wiht you next time im in st.cloud. i'll be out that way again in the spring..

beef
12-19-2006, 07:20 PM
I remember reading about a new floating abatement system used in a slalom tournament in Europe this past summer. Found info on it HERE (http://www.womensportreport.com/WATERSKI%20WORLD%20CUP%20STOP%20IN%20NORTHERN%20IR ELAND.htm).

The wavbarrier.com website doesn't seem functional, but maybe you can track them down.

André
12-19-2006, 08:01 PM
I remember reading about a new floating abatement system used in a slalom tournament in Europe this past summer. Found info on it HERE (http://www.womensportreport.com/WATERSKI%20WORLD%20CUP%20STOP%20IN%20NORTHERN%20IR ELAND.htm).

The wavbarrier.com website doesn't seem functional, but maybe you can track them down.
Anyone noticed the cash prizes at that World Cup stop of Ireland???
780 000$ US...

TMCNo1
12-19-2006, 09:32 PM
Our club has a private lake (it's really an old quarry) that we use. It is great from many perspectives (like no other boats), but one it suffers in is bounce-back. The best shoreline for the course with respect to the wind is essentially a cliff wall for about half the length. Predictibly, there is major wake bounceback. We go down & back, then have to wait awhile to go again. We have done some experimenting, mainly draintile (4" perforated flexible pipe), filled with insulation, secured a few feet from the wall. It worked a little bit, but not really enough to do too much. We've thought of using plastic construction fence, the stuff with holes in it. I've thought about somehow placing some sheets of something a few feet from the wall, half in the water & half out, at an angle to mimic a gradual shoreline, but that might be quite expensive & time consuming.
Just wondering if anyone has some experience or thoughts in minimizing (or eliminating) the wake bounce-back.

Still thinking of waterskiing up here in the frozen tundra . . . no snow yet to play in :(

Thanks,
Kevin


A couple private ski lakes (non-manmade) that held tournaments here in the SE used old oak wooden pallets anchored on the shore or floating just off the troublesome shoreline, then they pulled them out during the offseason to dry out. There are many companies who give these pallets away just to get them out of their sight. They worked great!

slalomskifreak
12-19-2006, 09:44 PM
Wish I had a picture of them, but a quarry lake around here used floating "used tires" chained together. The tires were standing up, not laying down. It was used as turn islands since the quarry was so deep. It worked really well and was super cheap. Not the prettiest thing I have ever seen, but who cares. The only other way that I am aware of is either grade the bank to flat or put alot of rip-rap down.

Peace out,

Curt

Kevin 89MC
12-20-2006, 10:17 AM
Thanks guys. The pipes that were tried were just like the pool lane dividers. It didn't really do much with the big waves. We've thought about pallets, we may try that next year. Rigging those (or anything) is going to be tough. The "shore" is literally a vertical rock wall from 10' above the water to 50' below. I doubt the DNR police would allow tires, they're tough up here, and even have jurisdiction to come on to our completely private, man made lake. I'll definitely keep checking wavebarrier.com.
Rod, I'd love to ski with you, if you're a member of USA waterski and want to pay $30 for a "temporary" membership. The privelege of skiing on our quarry is not cheap. :( It is south of the cities, so about 1-1/2 hours from St. Cloud.
Kevin

JohnnyB
12-20-2006, 10:31 AM
I'd be leary of pallets or other things that would leave debris in the water :eek:

What if you strung two steel cables, one at the surface and one about 15" below the surface and filled them with old tires??? Kinda like pool lane dividers on steroids.

Rigging pallets, logs or whatever could probably be done best with a large hammer drill, concrete anchors, aircraft cable and crimpers...probably not cheap. Install would be fun for about the 1st 1/2 hour and then a PITA after that.....

Let us know what you come up with.

My brother lives in the cities....I should look ya up when I'm out that way....couple times/year

chudson
12-22-2006, 11:38 AM
The place they had the Nationals at in the late 70's down in DuQuoin IL. had that problem the first year and I think they come in and cut back the banks edge so wakes would come into a more shallow shoreline and mostly die out rather than hit the banks of the shore and role back out into the water. This site was an old strip mine area the made into a beautiful park adjoining the DuQuoin State Fair grounds. Know anybody with a Hi-ho and a dump truck and a jack-hammer?

DanC
12-22-2006, 12:46 PM
Kevin,
Just my long winded babble here.
I can see why the pipes/floating logs didn't work. Old fashion swimming lane dividers were just ropes or cable with floats. They did nothing to dissipate the waves because they just bobbed with the wave. Modern lane dividers are high tension cables with plastic donuts and paddle wheels. They are strung axially like a necklace so that they spin freely. The paddle wheel's spinning is what absorbs the energy from the wave and attenuates its propagation.

Maybe you can come up with the same type of thing on a larger scale. cut up 55 gallon plastic drums?... The challenge with this is that you need a high tension cable or anchor it to the bottom at numerous points so that the "paddle mechanism" doesn't just bob with the waves (which absorbs very little energy), they need to spin.

I kinda like Johny's idea. Instead of pallets maybe you can rig a vertical fence, like a chain link fence with slats. Neutral buoyancy with floats so that half is above water and half is below the water. Temporary installation, install it by pulling it out like an airplane tows a message banner. Waves will hit it and get cut in half as they pass through. Those waves will then reflect off the rock wall and get cut in half again as they pass through fence heading back into the course. Experiment with the spacing of the slats in the fence, probably every other slot.
Good luck.