PDA

View Full Version : Mt. Everest TV Show


Datdude
12-16-2006, 01:41 PM
Have any of you seen the TV show on the Discovery Channel about the guys climbing Mt. Everest? I saw it for the second time last night and was amazed at the stuff these guys go through to climb a mountain. I don't see the value in losing fingers, toes or worse to frostbite to say I climbed a mountain..but to each his own I guess. The guys in the show had been on the mountain for 47 days to acclimate to the altitude. They showed the climbers going past dead bodies, oxygen canisters, and other garbage:eek: . Pretty amazing stuff.

Leroy
12-16-2006, 02:00 PM
I'm an Everest junkie and saw it. They have had this on for some time, but this was the best show so far. The video from the mountain is getting better and better every year.

There are ~12 Everest videos in our library, watched them all!

Have you read Unto Thin Air?

shepherd
12-16-2006, 05:37 PM
Great book:

"Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster" is author Jon Krakauer's harrowing chronicle of "the deadliest season in the history of Everest." On assignment for Outside magazine, Krakauer traveled to Nepal in March of 1996 to join a guided climb to the summit of Mound Everest. "The Everest climb had rocked my life to its core, and it became desperately important for me to record the events in complete detail," writes Krakauer, "this book is the fruit of that compulsion."

Have you seen the IMAX film that was shot during the same time period reported in the book? Good stuff.

Haven't seen the TV show yet, but the commercials for it look interesting.

JohnnyB
12-16-2006, 05:59 PM
Great book:

"Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster" is author Jon Krakauer's harrowing chronicle of "the deadliest season in the history of Everest." On assignment for Outside magazine, Krakauer traveled to Nepal in March of 1996 to join a guided climb to the summit of Mound Everest. "The Everest climb had rocked my life to its core, and it became desperately important for me to record the events in complete detail," writes Krakauer, "this book is the fruit of that compulsion."

Have you seen the IMAX film that was shot during the same time period reported in the book? Good stuff.

Haven't seen the TV show yet, but the commercials for it look interesting.

Didn't they make a movie based on the book????

BrianM
12-16-2006, 07:39 PM
I have been watching the show. Loved the book Into Thin Air and the IMAX movie. Pretty wild what those guys do. Oh and this is an interesting site that has a completely different view of the operation that the Discovery Channel went up with. Some crazy things happen up there. http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?news=15288

3event
12-16-2006, 08:08 PM
I've seen a couple episodes and the DVR is set to tape the last 2 this week. It's an amazing look into what those people go thru. I have to ask myself why a guy with a family would do that..... I also wonder how hard it is on the camera man (or men) - being the one responsible for recording the whole expedition couldn't make it any easier.

The IMAX film is fantastic. I agree it's a must see if you like this show.

Sodar
12-16-2006, 08:16 PM
I have the DVR set to it also! It is a pretty intense show. I too have always been an Everest junky. The IMAX movie was absolutely incredible. I think that these guys are completely nuts, but their nuts clank as they walk, because I remember how I felt on the top of Mount Whitney at only 14,000 feet (not even the height of thier base camp!!). The cost of it is incredible, but then to pay that kind of money to possibly lose fingers or even worse, lose your life is amazing. All I think about when watching these guys struggle up the mountain with 2006 technology is what complete studs the guys were that did it 50 years ago!!! The shurpas are the truely bionic men though... carrying 1/2 there body weight, while us westerners are struggling up the hill with a backpack!!

shepherd
12-17-2006, 09:38 AM
I also wonder how hard it is on the camera man (or men) - being the one responsible for recording the whole expedition couldn't make it any easier.


Exactly! I remember watching those old National Geographic shows of some guys hanging onto a cliff while climbing a mountain, and thinking that if those guys have it hard, what about the dude with the camera hanging with them? :rolleyes:

TOO-TALL
12-17-2006, 01:54 PM
I have been watching the show. Loved the book Into Thin Air and the IMAX movie. Pretty wild what those guys do. Oh and this is an interesting site that has a completely different view of the operation that the Discovery Channel went up with. Some crazy things happen up there. http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?news=15288

WOW......That was a good read. Thanks

Datdude
12-18-2006, 05:49 PM
I thought the IMAX movie was great. I have another Everest movie on my Netflix list that should be here soon. I wonder how much the sherpas get paid?

atlfootr
12-20-2006, 09:19 PM
I saw it too last night, when the "Russell Team" I think it was began desending down the mountain and one of the guy's spotted a man from another team that was left to die alone at an elevation of 28,000 feet on the top portion of the mountain.

Anyone see this part?

atlfootr
12-20-2006, 09:20 PM
I wonder how much the sherpas get paid?WHATEVER it is, IT'S NOT ENOUGH!

point1234
12-20-2006, 10:27 PM
yah I seen that episode last night. It was pretty good. Also read the book Into thin Air. That mountain has got to be just littered with junk and bodies. It has got to be hard on those guys when they passed that guy on the mountain. Not much you can do for him, my question is where is the rest of that guys expedition. Why would you want to be by yourself in something like that. Ever heard of the buddy system. Worked good swimming at the local pond.

Monte
12-20-2006, 10:37 PM
yah I seen that episode last night. It was pretty good. Also read the book Into thin Air. That mountain has got to be just littered with junk and bodies. It has got to be hard on those guys when they passed that guy on the mountain. Not much you can do for him, my question is where is the rest of that guys expedition. Why would you want to be by yourself in something like that. Ever heard of the buddy system. Worked good swimming at the local pond.

No kidding on the Junk and bodies. They need to make the folks going up bring one extra bottle back, Ive seen a few pics with insane amounts of bottles lying everywhere. As for the bodies I say leave em laying... they died to get there. As for the people who are actively dying it has got to be hard, but at some point your own survival takes over and that is some extreme $#!^. I din't see last nights episode, but I'm sure they'll run it again.. What happened to the biker from CA?

BrianM
12-21-2006, 10:01 AM
yah I seen that episode last night. It was pretty good. Also read the book Into thin Air. That mountain has got to be just littered with junk and bodies. It has got to be hard on those guys when they passed that guy on the mountain. Not much you can do for him, my question is where is the rest of that guys expedition. Why would you want to be by yourself in something like that. Ever heard of the buddy system. Worked good swimming at the local pond.
I saw it too last night, when the "Russell Team" I think it was began desending down the mountain and one of the guy's spotted a man from another team that was left to die alone at an elevation of 28,000 feet on the top portion of the mountain.

Anyone see this part? Read this link for a little more info on that. Its a little long but a great read. http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?news=15288
(http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?news=15288)

mbeach
12-21-2006, 12:07 PM
i am also amazed at what people put themselves through to get to the top of a big mountain - must be the testosterone thing. anyway, i watch the series whenever it is shown on discovery and still shake my head at some of the dumb decisions that are made and the sights i see. to name a few, the "road jam" on the way to the summit strands the climbers who got a late start the final morning. this resulted in problems with frostbite and oxygen reserves. the climb boss told them to give it up, tried to convince them that they would be dead if they continued, but they continued on anyway. the guide on the mountain also tried to get them to abort. apparently, light headedness kicked in and reasoning with them was impossible. have not seen "chapter 2", but i think one or more had to be left on the mountain to suffer the consequences of incredibly bad decisions. also, they are not just jeporadizing their lives but also the lives of those around them. if we are talking about the same tv series, did anyone see the double amuputee from the knees down in the road jam? talk about jeporadizing others, wow!! we have a MD here in iowa city in his 50's that has attempted the climb twice in the last 10 years. on his last attempt, he was within 300-ft of the summit and had to give it up. heard him speak about the climb, its preparation, training, etc., only to have to bail at the last moment due to exhaustion and nasty impending conditions projected to make his descent extremely difficult and dangerous. that was an example of a good decision - a returning father, husband, and grandfather to those who love him.

BrianM
12-21-2006, 12:21 PM
One of the guys that did not tun around when told to ended up paying a very high price. He did finally turn around before the summit and made it back alive but he lost the tips of all of his fingers and toes.

Harvey
12-21-2006, 12:56 PM
I havent been watching this show and frankly I think that climbing that mountain is a waste of time and money however I was horrified by what I saw last night. My roomate has been watching the whole series and convinced me to watch last night. To watch them leave a person, who is still alive, behind to die is unspeakable. Were I in that position I would rather come home to my family and friends as the guy who didn't make the summit but saved the life of a fallen climber than the guy who summited and did nothing for a dying man. As I watched last night I tried to come up with a multitude of ways to save a life up there. It almost made me sick when Russell told Max to just keep going.

Leroy
12-21-2006, 01:12 PM
I'm with you also Harvey. But, you have to really understand a lot about the mountain to realize that when you are above a certain altitude leaving the guy there to die is about the only option. Other options normally end up with more people dead. It's part of the lure I think, what doesn't kill me or take my fingers and toes....makes me stronger!

Harvey
12-21-2006, 01:38 PM
I can see the trade off. You might lose your life if you try to save anothers. Human life, even a strangers, is worth more than my bragging rights and is worth enough for me to try.

If my expedition leader takes it upon himself to guide my climb to the top of the mountain, which is risking my life, then he should guide me in the saving of another mans life, which is risking my life. The only difference is the level to which my life is risked. I guess my point is if I die climbing down the mountain he still gets paid, if I die climbing down trying to save a man's life he still gets paid. Why would the leader not aid in the saving of another mans life especially if there are more people wanting to help? If he doesn't get paid until I make it safely to the bottom then I can understand the motivation to not help a dying stranger, I don't agree with it but I understand people motivated by money. What I can't understand is the disregard for human life based on what seems like nothing!

Monte
12-21-2006, 01:56 PM
I can see the trade off. You might lose your life if you try to save anothers. Human life, even a strangers, is worth more than my bragging rights and is worth enough for me to try.

If my expedition leader takes it upon himself to guide my climb to the top of the mountain, which is risking my life, then he should guide me in the saving of another mans life, which is risking my life. The only difference is the level to which my life is risked. I guess my point is if I die climbing down the mountain he still gets paid, if I die climbing down trying to save a man's life he still gets paid. Why would the leader not aid in the saving of another mans life especially if there are more people wanting to help? If he doesn't get paid until I make it safely to the bottom then I can understand the motivation to not help a dying stranger, I don't agree with it but I understand people motivated by money. What I can't understand is the disregard for human life based on what seems like nothing!

As selfish as it may seem, the clients that he is taking up and bringing down are his. If they die it looks bad on his resume. The climbing world is pissed about it too. Until you are in a next to death situation it is hard to judge the actions of others.

Harvey
12-21-2006, 02:54 PM
As selfish as it may seem, the clients that he is taking up and bringing down are his. If they die it looks bad on his resume. The climbing world is pissed about it too. Until you are in a next to death situation it is hard to judge the actions of others.

How bad does it look on his resume that he instructs his clients to disregard the lives of their fellow man? Not a man I would trust with my life. I think I could find a more trustworthy guide. How about you?

I suppose it depends on the reputation he wants. I can tell you I sure as heck wouldn't have wanted him in a firehouse in New York on 9/11 or in the firehouse down the street from me for that matter.

Monte
12-21-2006, 03:20 PM
How bad does it look on his resume that he instructs his clients to disregard the lives of their fellow man? Not a man I would trust with my life. I think I could find a more trustworthy guide. How about you?

I suppose it depends on the reputation he wants. I can tell you I sure as heck wouldn't have wanted him in a firehouse in New York on 9/11 or in the firehouse down the street from me for that matter.

I'm not trying to justify his actions, as a matter of fact the more I read about him the more of a POS I think he is. The simple fact of the matter is he is running a business, and wants his climbers to come home alive so he can advertise 100% survival. He can always omit being a selfish *****.. On the other side of the coin at least two of the "climbers" he was helping to summit commited mutiny, they could have commited mutiny one more time.... I really think it is just a bad situation gone really bad... I do have to state though.. Every person who decides to climb everest knows that novices and experts alike have died en route to the summit and on the desent... They know the risk they are taking... and the ultimate price of that risk.. They accept it when they start up the mountan.. Unlike you and I who eliminate the risk by not going... Yes they should have helped him, but once up there the thought process is affected and reasoning skills are greatly diminished.

mastercraft1995
12-21-2006, 03:50 PM
I was not a fan of Russell from the get go and the more I read about him the less I like him. The guy that died was not in a group like the one Russell was leading from his a$$ 4000 feet below. I think Russell is getting burned at the stake and I don't think it's fair. The first guy that came upon him what could he of done? I guess he could have waited for Tim and Gerard and the 2 Chirpa's with them but then what would have happened? The 2 Chirpas where busy enough trying to get those 2 knuckleheads down the Mt. If Tim and Gerard would have turned around in the beginning maybe they could have helped. Or maybe they should have waited for another team to come off the Mt to help. But then they risk frost bite. Why aren't the other teams that past him getting burned at the stake? I just don't see why Russell is getting torn up like he is.

Why aren't the guys that where with the guy that died being torn up? They are the one's that left him to die and not Russell. That is who I would want to talk to not Russell the a$$hole.

Would I let him lead me on a trip to the top of Everest not a chance? When you climb that Mt you take a chance that you might not come back. Is the reward worth the risk is the question you have to ask. When it's all said and done I think he made the decision. I don't like it but I think he did the right thing. Russell can't be responsible of everyone on the Mt.

Monte
12-21-2006, 04:18 PM
I just don't see why Russell is getting torn up like he is.



Russell was recorded... And is obviously a great scapegoat..

Jwhitsett1129
12-21-2006, 04:58 PM
I think the real issue here is greed. Do the people in this expedition really have any business climbing Everest? The answer is no. And if Mr. Brice is as experienced and professional as he claims then he wouldn't have allowed a 60+ man who had just (two weeks prior) had a kidney removed, an ignorant, cocky biker with a back full of metal, and a double amputee to be a part of the expedition. His goal seems to simply be money and he thus allows individuals with little or no real climbing experience to go up the hill. While (from what I have read) Everest is not an overly technical climb, it is nonetheless and extraordinary physical and mental endeavor...one that should only be attempted by those in peak physical condition. It is my opinion that it is the responsibility of the guide who is making a large profit off of these trips to ultimately decide who is able bodied enough to embark on such a feat.

As far as leaving David Sharp on the mountain to die...I was not there so I guess it is not my place to judge what was deemed right and necessary at the time. That being said, I have been around water enough to know that when a boat or its crew is in trouble all vessels near enough to provide assistance make it an immediate priority to do so.

mastercraft1995
12-21-2006, 06:38 PM
Russell was recorded... And is obviously a great scapegoat..


Your right and I don't think we can just blame it on him. If he takes all the blame you're trying to tell me that he makes all the decisions on the mountain for all the teams and that's not the case at all. Everyone that was on the Mt that day is fare more guilty than Russell. Russell couldn't of done anything to help even if he wanted to. Each one of those climers that could of helped but chose to walk by Dave needs to look in the mirror and ask themselves what if that was me?

It's all about the mighty dollar.

atlfootr
12-21-2006, 08:01 PM
It would really blow to leave anyone on Everest, and knowing that they can't ever be recovered hurts even more.

Leroy
12-21-2006, 10:27 PM
You have to remember at this point on the mountain everyone can barely pick up one foot and move it in front of the other, they have probably only had 2-3 hours of sleep a night for a week or longer, their throat hurts and often have broken/sore ribs from coughing so hard, they got up at 11PM to start the summit, the mountain is mostly a knife edge with drop offs of 1000's of feet each side, you are dressed in clothing about 2 inches thick, you have only a little reserve of oxygen....I'm not sure what can be done to save someone in the death zone. If you sit around trying to help you are likely to get frost bite, you will not be able to carry someone, it really goes with the climb when you get ill up there and cannot move you are likely to die. Sometimes a dex shot or an extra boost of oxygen will get them moving again, but if they have been sitting there long they are so frozen they can't walk again. It isn't even possible to recover dead bodies from that high.

Another story:
http://www.mounteverest.net/news.php?id=10134