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View Full Version : HELP! Frozen Boat!


msauce
12-04-2006, 08:14 PM
I hadn't fully winterized my 2005 prostar 197 according to the steps in the manual (remove hoses, drain water, add antifreeze, etc.) Prior to parking it in the garage last weekend, I did run the boat out of the water for a bit to clear the majority of the water out... I just hadn't drained the hoses yet. I store it in my garage in the winter and I never thought that temps just below freezing would freeze the boat inside the garage (10 degrees is a different story, not 30ish). If you really want to know... I thought I might get a few more "indian summer days where we could go for a quick run" (Not). At any rate, I went out to check on it tonight and some of the hoses are solid with "SOME" ice in them.

Did I majorly mess up my boat? I'm putting a space heater out there tonight to thaw the lines in order to complete the winterization. Anybody have any thoughts on damage done, winterization, etc.

Thanks.

6ballsisall
12-04-2006, 08:20 PM
I'd say get that space heater in their asap! Keep it on until you can fully winterize.

Chief
12-04-2006, 08:33 PM
I'm sure you are okay. Get in there and pull those knock sensors and drain everything, the anitfreeze can wait. If there is no water in any systems to expand then you should be fine.

88 PS190
12-04-2006, 08:34 PM
Get its temp raised.. then follow all procedures.

trickskier
12-04-2006, 08:36 PM
I would think that since the hoses are thinner than the block, the water would freeze in them before freezing in the block. Check the freeze plugs on the side of the block to see if any of them show signs of popping out.

WTRSK1R
12-04-2006, 08:41 PM
At a minimum, put a light bulb under the motor box. A trouble light works well, but any light with a 60watt bulb will throw sufficient heat to keep everything just fine until you get the "full" winterization done. The sound proofing on the motor box will hold in a surprising amount of heat once you have the light in there. If it has only been one night, you probably have nothing to worry about.
Good Luck.

msauce
12-04-2006, 08:45 PM
One night... maybe two at the most. Once I get a little heat in there how do I make sure I"ve gotten all the water out? Shop vac on "blow" in the main intake hose?

Leroy
12-04-2006, 08:45 PM
I hope you are ok. I would also guess if it is only one night it should be ok, but certainly not something to chance. So many variables can determine if you have a big problem or not.

Good luck

Farmer Ted
12-04-2006, 08:51 PM
One night... maybe two at the most. Once I get a little heat in there how do I make sure I"ve gotten all the water out? Shop vac on "blow" in the main intake hose?


take the cover off the impeller remove all the hoses that are attached to the water pump

I'd skip blowing the hose thing

mash
12-04-2006, 09:03 PM
Drain the exhaust manifolds, drain the block, pull the hoses on the raw water pump, drain the trans cooler, and the mufflers. You should have ware running out of the block and manifolds. If so your probably OK.

Trouble light as suggested earlier should do the trick if it's not too cold.

msauce
12-04-2006, 09:04 PM
I have removed most of the hoses from the pump and engine... more than is recommended in the manual. I have some heat going in there to hopefully thaw it out. Honestly... I don't think there is too much water in the engine iteself. only the small hoses had some water (now ice) in them at the lowest points where they would pool. Everything on the intake side was dry but the majority of the ice is at the quick connect brass fitting at the back of the engine and a little in the two brass elbows coming out of the exhaust manifold. I thinnk that the water had places to expand to without doing any damage. Fingers crossed.

Should I run the engine once I thaw it out to get a little heat in it to make sure all of the ice and water is gone? Will that hurt it?

Chief
12-04-2006, 09:06 PM
I have removed most of the hoses from the pump and engine... more than is recommended in the manual. I have some heat going in there to hopefully thaw it out. Honestly... I don't think there is too much water in the engine iteself. only the small hoses had some water (now ice) in them at the lowest points where they would pool. Everything on the intake side was dry but the majority of the ice is at the quick connect brass fitting at the back of the engine and a little in the two brass elbows coming out of the exhaust manifold. I thinnk that the water had places to expand to without doing any damage. Fingers crossed.

Should I run the engine once I thaw it out to get a little heat in it to make sure all of the ice and water is gone? Will that hurt it?

Hey M did you get my PM?

east tx skier
12-04-2006, 09:29 PM
Take a close look at your water pump. If you didn't remove the hoses and spin the impeller over (kill switch removed) there was some water in there. Since it has a much thinner wall than the block, there's a good chance that it froze.

PendO
12-04-2006, 09:49 PM
Get its temp raised.. then follow all procedures.


Ditto ... get a good space heater, heat up your garage, and then finish winterizing

Sodar
12-04-2006, 09:55 PM
QUICK!!! GET HEATED BLANKETS, HEATERS, WARM WATER AND HUG YOUR MOTOR TO GIVE IT BODY HEAT! :D

JimN
12-04-2006, 11:05 PM
It doesn't matter if the hoses are thinner than the motor, the cast iron conducts heat a lot better and the block will probably freeze before the water in the hoses. Pull the hoses, drain the block and if it's frozen solid, warm it slowly. Water expands as it freezes and when it thaws. It's about the only thing that expands as it gets colder.

The amount of time saved by "hoping to get in some more Indian Summer days" is hardly worth ruining a motor.

erkoehler
12-05-2006, 12:25 AM
Where are you located? If I were you, I'd get it INDOOR and HEATED tomorrow AM!

edwinfuqua
12-05-2006, 12:50 AM
I have removed most of the hoses from the pump and engine... more than is recommended in the manual. I have some heat going in there to hopefully thaw it out. Honestly... I don't think there is too much water in the engine itself. only the small hoses had some water (now ice) in them at the lowest points where they would pool. Everything on the intake side was dry but the majority of the ice is at the quick connect brass fitting at the back of the engine and a little in the two brass elbows coming out of the exhaust manifold. I think that the water had places to expand to without doing any damage. Fingers crossed.

Should I run the engine once I thaw it out to get a little heat in it to make sure all of the ice and water is gone? Will that hurt it? Get it thawed out 1st.
Don't run the engine without lubrication to the impeller. I always drain the engine and exhaust then put the raw water hose in a bucket filled with antifreeze and water.. about 1/3 water and 2/3 pure antifreeze and let the impeller suck it up. Shut it off before all the water mix is gone. Now your hoses are lubricated and the impeller is too. So little water will be left in the block and exhaust that freezing should not cause any damage. Just for good luck I removed the thermostat and poured mix in the block then turned the motor over to get some ANTIFREEZE everywhere. Temps overnight of below 27F with filled areas will freeze without the MIX. You made mention of frost outside the hoses that were frozen, I think you should have some hose handy for next season. The heater is good, the light bulb is good. Don't forget your bilge pump and hoses too. Suck some MIX in them too! Good Luck, keep us posted. Edwin

John B
12-05-2006, 08:09 AM
If you have a shower or heater make sure you get all the water out of them too.

bigmac
12-05-2006, 09:15 AM
Could be worse...

.

bigmac
12-05-2006, 09:17 AM
You weren't the only one whom the weather caught off guard a little...

.

Sodar
12-05-2006, 09:24 AM
WOW Big Mac! Did you get those pictures? Who is liable for the dock overturning like that??

Sodar
12-05-2006, 09:26 AM
Looks like that offshoreboat is gunna walk away just fine because of the two boats with big superstructures next to him!

bigmac
12-05-2006, 09:29 AM
WOW Big Mac! Did you get those pictures? Who is liable for the dock overturning like that??No, I ran across them on another site. It occured in the midwest with this last big storm from a few days ago.

msauce
12-05-2006, 10:13 AM
UPDATE - I had a trouble light under the engine cover overnight. It was all thawed out this morning. I've pulled the two brass plugs on both sides of the block and all the water is now out. I have a space heater and the light going on the engine to keep it fairly warm. I think that a crisis has been overted. Here is the next question...

I'm confused: Some have suggested pumping the coolant system with antifreeze. Would you all suggest that I hook all the hoses back up (on a warmer day) and run antifreeze into the system or, now that I have drained all water from the system, should I leave it alone. I paniced about the ice and haven't added fuel stabilzer or fogging oil yet. I'm really not mentally challenged here! Just a bit caught off guard.

Chief
12-05-2006, 10:49 AM
You will get a 50/50 response on adding antifreeze, I would say yes on antifreeze (RV type). It helps prevent scaling rust in the passageways of the block but others will argue that it's okay to not use anti-freeze and just drain block and lines and tanks.

What I do is fill a five gallon buck with 50/50 antifreeze/water and hook up garden hose to flush pro and get engine to operating temp then I connect a small piece of hose to the flush pro and suck it up in the engine, just prior to the bucket being empty I start fogging the engine until the anti-freeze is gone and turn the engine off and that's it. I also coat the engine with some jet ski corrosion preventative (and anything else that can rust). Then it's all done!

Wax the boat and trailer and wait till it's warm again.

msauce
12-05-2006, 11:01 AM
JCROBSBY150 - Thanks for your help! I replied to your PM

bigmac
12-05-2006, 11:09 AM
You will get a 50/50 response on adding antifreeze, I would say yes on antifreeze (RV type). It helps prevent scaling rust in the passageways of the block but others will argue that it's okay to not use anti-freeze and just drain block and lines and tanks.

What I do is fill a five gallon buck with 50/50 antifreeze/water and hook up garden hose to flush pro and get engine to operating temp then I connect a small piece of hose to the flush pro and suck it up in the engine, just prior to the bucket being empty I start fogging the engine until the anti-freeze is gone and turn the engine off and that's it. I also coat the engine with some jet ski corrosion preventative (and anything else that can rust). Then it's all done!

Wax the boat and trailer and wait till it's warm again.RV antifreeze isn't supposed to be diluted - it's supposed to be used full-strength. Diluting it can give unpredictable freezing point suppression unless there is actually a dilution table on the bottle specific to that brand. The stuff is cheap - use it full strength.

If the engine is drained first, antifreeze can be poured into the block via the heater core intake line, or via the circulating pump intake hose (the one that comes off the raw water pump). It doesn't have to be run first, but the exhaust manifolds do have to be drained (which takes about 30 seconds).

msauce
12-05-2006, 11:19 AM
BIGMAC - In my situation, would you just reconnect all hoses and drain plugs and do exactly what you said... don't run the engine again and just pour RV Antifreeze full strength into the circulating pump intake hose... how much do you think it would take?

bigmac
12-05-2006, 11:36 AM
BIGMAC - In my situation, would you just reconnect all hoses and drain plugs and do exactly what you said... don't run the engine again and just pour RV Antifreeze full strength into the circulating pump intake hose... how much do you think it would take?

In the 25 years I've owned boats in Minnesota, I've never used antifreeze until this MasterCraft, so I'm not convinced of the absolute necessity of winterizing with antifreeze. Basically, I use it now because my dealer recommended it and for rust protection. I use -100 propylene glycol, which contains corrosion inhibitors. Last year, I sucked -50 RV antifreeze (NON-diluted) into the block via the intake pump from a bucket and also pumped it through the heater core (took about 5 gallons), then drained the whole unit and left all the hoses and plugs detached according to the winterizing procedures recommended in MasterCraft's owner's manual. This year, the block, exhaust manifiold and heater core were filled with -100 propylene glycol (NON-diluted) and none of it was drained. I'll just start it up in the spring and good to go.

Not knowing where you live, it's hard to recommend anything to you, but this is Minnesota, and extended temps of -30 are very possible so winterizing is a step that must be done meticulously. Drain the heater, drain the shower, drain the exhaust manifold, drain the block (both sides), drain the circulating hoses. That's what you NEED to do. Additional peace of mind can be obtained by subsequently pouring in 5 gallons of -50 RV antifreeze either by sucking it in through the raw water intake hose (Flush-Pro method) or by pouring it in. For storage lubrication and corrosion protection in addition to better protection against freezing of trapped water in the block/exhaust/hoses/pump/heater, use -100 propylene glycol like Sierra LowTox, Prestone LowTox, Texaco PG.

east tx skier
12-05-2006, 11:43 AM
Whether you decide to use antifreeze or not, you need to run that boat on a hose/bucket to move the stabilized fuel around the fuel system.

erkoehler
12-05-2006, 11:51 AM
Where are you located?

msauce
12-05-2006, 11:55 AM
In Indianapolis. Boat is stored in the garage that is insulated but it is not heated.

Leroy
12-05-2006, 12:08 PM
Hey Msauce; I'm in Carmel, where were you planning on one more run here in December? I put mine to sleep end of October.

msauce
12-05-2006, 12:16 PM
I actually ski'd the sunday after thanksgiving when it was in the upper 60s. Water was really cold (51) but it was great to be out. Drysuits are good. Yes... unfortunately, I was hoping for a few more 50-60 days but I think that won't happen. Why do we live here?

bigmac
12-05-2006, 12:29 PM
The amazing thing about this thread is that (so far) no one from the south, southwest, west, west coast parts of the US has posted here to tell us how they never have to winterize.

Sodar
12-05-2006, 12:31 PM
The amazing thing about this thread is that (so far) no one from the south, southwest, west, west coast parts of the US has posted here to tell us how they never have to winterize.

Hey BigMac, I have not had to winterize yet... someone came and test drove the boat last weekend!!


Sorry to ruin the streak!!! 8p :D

Sodar
12-05-2006, 06:05 PM
Was intrigued by BigMac's pictures and found this on another forum. Guy has his $780,000 offshore boat on a lift and this happened... his deductible is 10% of the value insured and the marina is completely NOT liable!!

http://di-vo.net/diozarks/images/Lodge/lodge2.jpg

Sodar
12-05-2006, 06:15 PM
One last link that is just incredible...

http://di-vo.net/diozarks/

jimmer2880
12-06-2006, 06:02 AM
One last link that is just incredible...

http://di-vo.net/diozarks/

wow.... I'm speachless.

Leroy
12-06-2006, 07:31 AM
Good TJ Sodar! ;)

I think someone did not design that dock very well. What a mess.

Sodar
12-06-2006, 08:17 AM
[QUOTE=Leroy]Good TJ Sodar! ;)QUOTE]

Hey, thread was over... he said he got heaters into it and was going to run it with antifreeze. Catastrophe averted!!! :o

phecksel
12-06-2006, 11:38 AM
didn't the same thing happen a few winters ago in Ohio?