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DrNautica
11-27-2006, 10:57 PM
AFROTC?? Any Advice??

My 17 year old high school senior is very serious about joining the Air Force ROTC program at The Ohio State University. His intent is to go into the College of Engineering and to major in Aviation. His long term goals are to become a pilot and fly commercially/corporately (if he doesn't make a career of the military.)

We have a meeting with the AFROTC Captain next Tuesday (5 Dec.) Can any of you with experience give me some pros/cons and any ideas of what to ask/discuss with the good Captain?

LakePirate
11-27-2006, 11:05 PM
How is his vision?

I know that with mine I would have been scraping bird schit off of runways.

Footin
11-27-2006, 11:20 PM
Before you sign anything, have your son take the tests to confirm he can be a pilot.

GO BUCKS!

DrNautica
11-27-2006, 11:51 PM
What tests? Vision may be an issue but we don't know for sure.

I've also been told (by an Air Force Recruiter) that they now provide Lasik (or equivelent) which is approved for flight status. Can anyone confirm whether this is true. I don't necessarily believe everything a recruiter tells me.

6ballsisall
11-27-2006, 11:53 PM
I don't necessarily believe everything a recruiter tells me.


Thats smart thinkin' right there........;)

stumbledog
11-27-2006, 11:54 PM
Cant be color blind for one.

shepherd
11-28-2006, 12:01 AM
Cant be color blind for one.

Yep, that's what kept me out. I told them if no flight school, they can't have me. Learned to fly on my own dime.

Make sure he can pick the numbers out of those stupid dots!

DrNautica
11-28-2006, 12:02 AM
He's not color blind. So at least he has that going for him.

Hoosier Bob
11-28-2006, 12:08 AM
Why can't they put all into writing? This is very serious and noble. Not having been in military but military school for ever I would say anything that is said should be said in writing. Other than that there are a lot of people here who should know. Have someone read (lawyer?)what he is signing and if his intentions and expectations can and will be met. Great that he has the interest!:D
HB

Hrkdrivr
11-28-2006, 12:18 AM
If someone can teach me how to PM w/him I can give him some pointers. I'm a USAFA grad, former USAF pilot training instructor, current C-130 instructor pilot, and future airline pilot hopeful (will retire as a Lt Col in about a year)!! :D Be VERY careful w/recruiters...ROTC is a safe way to figure out if he's really interested in the AF life.

shepherd
11-28-2006, 12:18 AM
He's not color blind. So at least he has that going for him.

That's good. Back when they (Navy/Marines) were trying to recruit me they said pilot candidates needed 20/20 uncorrected, but you could be a backseat aviator (e.g, "Goose") if your vision could be corrected to 20/20. Even then, I believe the competition to get in was probably fierce among those who were medically qualified. I'm not sure the AF would be willing, or able, to guarantee anything.

rodltg2
11-28-2006, 12:29 AM
would a quicker route to fly for an airline, be to go to one of those flight academy schools instead of the air force?

Hoosier Bob
11-28-2006, 12:30 AM
What do you know Rod you have flat feet?8p

Farmer Ted
11-28-2006, 12:52 AM
What tests? Vision may be an issue but we don't know for sure.

I've also been told (by an Air Force Recruiter) that they now provide Lasik (or equivelent) which is approved for flight status. Can anyone confirm whether this is true. I don't necessarily believe everything a recruiter tells me.


I asked to be put on the "stand-by" list for PRK awhile back. Flyers and Spooks have priority, then it's Cops and everyone else.

I'm getting a flight physical tomorrow and I'll verify that info is still correct.

Farmer Ted
11-28-2006, 12:56 AM
If someone can teach me how to PM w/him I can give him some pointers. I'm a USAFA grad, former USAF pilot training instructor, current C-130 instructor pilot, and future airline pilot hopeful (will retire as a Lt Col in about a year)!! :D Be VERY careful w/recruiters...ROTC is a safe way to figure out if he's really interested in the AF life.


all that and he's still lost without his crew chief.....:D

Mikey
11-28-2006, 09:08 AM
all that and he's still lost without his crew chief.....:D

:uglyhamme :uglyhamme Now thats funny!

DrNautica
11-28-2006, 10:05 AM
Hrkdrivr,

You should have a PM waiting on you. Anyone who wants to communicate directly via email can do so at WaterMakerMan@EagleMarineInc.com. I appreciate the help.

Dave

dog paw
11-28-2006, 10:28 AM
How is his vision?

I know that with mine I would have been scraping bird schit off of runways.


It hurt my stepson when tryed to get in. His eyes were pretty bad. If memory serves at the time if he had PRK I still dont think it would fly

puck_11
11-28-2006, 11:51 AM
AFROTC?? Any Advice??

My 17 year old high school senior is very serious about joining the Air Force ROTC program at The Ohio State University. His intent is to go into the College of Engineering and to major in Aviation. His long term goals are to become a pilot and fly commercially/corporately (if he doesn't make a career of the military.)

We have a meeting with the AFROTC Captain next Tuesday (5 Dec.) Can any of you with experience give me some pros/cons and any ideas of what to ask/discuss with the good Captain?


Good luck to your son! I'm in flight training with the Navy and I'll offer my advice. If his long term goal is to fly with the airlines, make sure that he wants to serve his country first, as that initial commitment is 11 years. If he just wants to fly for the airlines, he can pick up his certificates and be in with the regionals in 4 to 5 years. Also, I would recommend skipping the aviation degree (I have one). While it is great for flying, if you want to do something else, or need to do something else, it's worthless. Get an engineering degree and take flight classes on the side. That way you get the best of both worlds. Plus if he ever wants to become a test pilot, an aviation degree won't get him in.

M-Funf
11-28-2006, 12:42 PM
I went to the recruiting office when I was a Sr. in High School. I wanted to fly.

My eyesight wasn't the problem (20/15), but my hearing was...I'm mostly deaf in one ear. That would have kept me from flying, so I opted not to go...

DrNautica
11-28-2006, 12:50 PM
Good luck to your son! I'm in flight training with the Navy and I'll offer my advice. If his long term goal is to fly with the airlines, make sure that he wants to serve his country first, as that initial commitment is 11 years. If he just wants to fly for the airlines, he can pick up his certificates and be in with the regionals in 4 to 5 years. Also, I would recommend skipping the aviation degree (I have one). While it is great for flying, if you want to do something else, or need to do something else, it's worthless. Get an engineering degree and take flight classes on the side. That way you get the best of both worlds. Plus if he ever wants to become a test pilot, an aviation degree won't get him in.


He has been accepted into the College of Engineering so he will come out with engineering degree with a major in Aviation (I hope.) I've talked with him about possibly persuing metalurgy so as to have a backup possiblility in working for the NTSB if the flying thing doesn't work out for whatever reason. Thanks for your input!

michael freeman
11-28-2006, 01:13 PM
He has been accepted into the College of Engineering so he will come out with engineering degree with a major in Aviation (I hope.) I've talked with him about possibly persuing metalurgy so as to have a backup possiblility in working for the NTSB if the flying thing doesn't work out for whatever reason. Thanks for your input!

I think he is saying look into a degree in Aerospace Engineering (i.e. BSAE) not a degree in Aviation. People with an Aerospace degree are getting harder to find these days, thus supply and demand issues (advantage to your son) come into play. (opps missed the metallurgy part, that is fine to if that is what sounds fun to him)

I had the same plan out of high school but ended up going with my Aerospace Engineering degree instead of going into the upper class ROTC that required service. I now work for a defense contractor designing simulators for the Air Force. In the early to mid 90's they were down sizing the pilots positions and I was having more fun with the engineering classes.

DrNautica
11-28-2006, 06:18 PM
michael freeman,

Thank you for your comments. Designing the sims sounds like a great gig. Do you fly?

slalomskifreak
11-28-2006, 09:21 PM
DrNautica,

I sent you an email.

Curt

DrNautica
11-28-2006, 10:03 PM
DrNautica,

I sent you an email.

Curt


SSF,

One back at ya.

Thanks.

jakethebt
11-28-2006, 11:06 PM
Flying for the Air Force is a great goal. It sounds like you have some good contacts here to give you some advice about what to believe and how hard it is to get there.

As far as college goes, he can not go to wrong with Ohio State. He should select his degree carefully depending on what he wants to do. I would recomend being as generic as possible with his degree and as specific as he can be with his electives or majors. I would suggest Mechanical Engineer with classes in Aerospace if he wants to work on airframes or engines. I would suggest Electrical Engineer if he wants to work on anything else on the air craft. Either of these would give him something to fall back on if flying did not work out.

One thing to consider is what jobs are out there and will be out there. Civil pilots are having a real hard time finding/keeping jobs with all the airline chapter 11 and 13s. If he wantsto stay in the aviation industry in some form, then the Air Force is a great start, even if he does not fly. It will give him veterans preference for any government civilian jobs and give him an advantage in the aerospace industry.

PM me if you want more info.

djhuff
11-29-2006, 09:25 AM
I have a good friend who was in AFROTC. He didn't do as well as he could have in school and thus only got a Nav slot, but has since worked his butt off, applied for a pilot slot and got one. Now he is in fighter school and has been assigned to an F-16.

BTW, his degree is in Economics. From my understanding, it is not about how well you do on tests now, but more about how you do once you are in the program. If his physical attributes don't hold him back and he is willing to work for it, then go for it.

vtbuehler
11-29-2006, 06:26 PM
Fly in the Air Force and then use the Aerospace Engineering degree, right now the airline industry is not the place to be. I have been a Airline pilot for a Major for 17 years and if I could replace the money, I would walk away tomorrow. I have lost my retirement and have lost money and many other benifits. Most people getting into it now will never get to a major with the number of people on the street.
When he get out of the AFA the only jobs available to him will be the express jobs with starting money in teens to low twenties, and the way they are going I wouldn't be surprised to see that go even lower. My son wants to be a pilot and there is no way in this world he is going to that for a living. Just food for thought.

TourneyChef
11-29-2006, 06:34 PM
all that and he's still lost without his crew chief.....:D


Funny how it takes a college education to break 'em, and a high school education to fix 'em!

Maintainers (even booger hookers), keep 'em flyin!

DrNautica
11-29-2006, 07:06 PM
Fly in the Air Force and then use the Aerospace Engineering degree, right now the airline industry is not the place to be. I have been a Airline pilot for a Major for 17 years and if I could replace the money, I would walk away tomorrow. I have lost my retirement and have lost money and many other benifits. Most people getting into it now will never get to a major with the number of people on the street.
When he get out of the AFA the only jobs available to him will be the express jobs with starting money in teens to low twenties, and the way they are going I wouldn't be surprised to see that go even lower. My son wants to be a pilot and there is no way in this world he is going to that for a living. Just food for thought.



Buehler??? Buehler... (sorry, I had to go there.)

I'm sorry you feel that way about your chosen profession. I know there have been many, many (way too many) negative changes in the airline and professional pilot world. I can certainly understand why the more experienced pilots would be bitter about that change mostly due to loss of income and, perhaps more importantly, security. But I can assure you that your's is not the only industry to feel the pinch of difficult economic times. I know quite a few professional pilots, a couple who are in the top 5 seniority positions with major carriers, and none of them are happy with some of the change. But, neither do I see them leaving their jobs for greener pastures.

These guys have spoken with my son about how tough the industry is, yet he still wants to do it. In his words, "I'm not looking to get rich, just make an honest living at something I would love to do." Quite honestly, I hope that I'm not subconsiously pushing him in a direction I wish I'd taken way back when. I appreciate your comments and I will certainly pass them along to my son with all of the others. This is his decision to make.

Farmer Ted
11-29-2006, 07:38 PM
Funny how it takes a college education to break 'em, and a high school education to fix 'em!

Maintainers (even booger hookers), keep 'em flyin!


booger hookers is no longer the politically correct term


Nasal Engineer better is much more acceptable....:D

Leroy
11-29-2006, 07:52 PM
I would be surprised if Lasik is acceptable unless it is improved. If he lost pressure at 35,000 he likely would not be able to see very well. The radial cuts in the eye to make the vision right allows the eye to change even more at lower pressure at altitude.

This is a problem for Mt Everest climbers.

Good luck to your son!

BriEOD
11-30-2006, 10:59 PM
would a quicker route to fly for an airline, be to go to one of those flight academy schools instead of the air force?
Also a much more expensive one, with far inferior training.

DrNautica
12-01-2006, 10:37 AM
BriEOD,

Thank you. Your PM's are full. You may want to clean out your closet.

jakethebt
12-01-2006, 08:21 PM
LASIC is not on the approved list for AF pilots, only PRK.

michael freeman
12-04-2006, 08:46 AM
michael freeman,

Thank you for your comments. Designing the sims sounds like a great gig. Do you fly?

Sorry I was out of town on business, just got back.

Nope, no pilotís license. Donít know how I would do in a civilian aircraft, but I would have no problem walking onto any military base and taking off in a modern fighter. I probably have thousands of hours in fighter simulators.

michael freeman
12-04-2006, 08:46 AM
(double post)

michael freeman
12-04-2006, 09:05 AM
Flying for the Air Force is a great goal. It sounds like you have some good contacts here to give you some advice about what to believe and how hard it is to get there.

As far as college goes, he can not go to wrong with Ohio State. He should select his degree carefully depending on what he wants to do. I would recomend being as generic as possible with his degree and as specific as he can be with his electives or majors. I would suggest Mechanical Engineer with classes in Aerospace if he wants to work on airframes or engines. I would suggest Electrical Engineer if he wants to work on anything else on the air craft. Either of these would give him something to fall back on if flying did not work out.

One thing to consider is what jobs are out there and will be out there. Civil pilots are having a real hard time finding/keeping jobs with all the airline chapter 11 and 13s. If he wantsto stay in the aviation industry in some form, then the Air Force is a great start, even if he does not fly. It will give him veterans preference for any government civilian jobs and give him an advantage in the aerospace industry.

PM me if you want more info.

Aerospace engineering is the perfect degree to give him a taste of several engineering disciplines. The degree actually covers All the other engineering disciplines to some small degree. This cannot be said about the other engineering degrees. I had a friend in college that preached the same thing about Mechanical engineering and it did not work out so well for him. If you want to design aircraft get a AE degree. If you want to design how to fold a box using the least amount of cardboard, get a ME degree. (Sorry, this is what I saw here).

Main thing is to get a degree doing something he likes.

DrNautica
12-05-2006, 08:29 PM
Gentlemen,

Thank you all every one for your advice, private messages, etc. We just completed the meeting with the AFROTC and all went very well. Suffice it to say, my son has a LOT of things to think about now. From the Air Force to choice of major or even whether to go the engineering route. These are his decisions to make. Fortunately he has a good head on his shoulders.

I will let you know more when he has made his decisions.

Thank you.

BTW, the AFROTC Admissions Officer was extremely informative, knowledgeble and forthright. Himself an AFROTC grad with a business degree, he has been in the AF for 7 years and has just decided to leave for civilian life. All in all a very positive meeting. More to follow.

Thank you all again.:)