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View Full Version : boat is all winterized!


blackbeauty02
11-17-2006, 06:58 PM
so as all of you know I've been having a hell of a time getting the last two plugs on the exhaust manifolds off. so i went ahead and bit the bullet and paid the $75 to have the local marine shop do it. but what i was wondering will it be okay sitting outside for the winter with just the plugs pulled? i drove around for a good 20 minutes so there shouldn't be any water in it. I didn't do the antifreeze thing b/c everyone told me it's not necessary and Oklahoma winters aren't very brutal. someone post and give me a peace of mind so i stop worrying.

Jerseydave
11-17-2006, 08:13 PM
My suggestion........put the plugs back in, take the t-stat out and pour the pink stuff into the engine block.

1. It will dilute any standing water that may still be in there.
2. Engine blocks can rust or "scale" from the inside because of condensation since the block is just filled with "air".

3. Sleep well all winter :)

Chief
11-17-2006, 08:21 PM
so as all of you know I've been having a hell of a time getting the last two plugs on the exhaust manifolds off. so i went ahead and bit the bullet and paid the $75 to have the local marine shop do it. but what i was wondering will it be okay sitting outside for the winter with just the plugs pulled? i drove around for a good 20 minutes so there shouldn't be any water in it. I didn't do the antifreeze thing b/c everyone told me it's not necessary and Oklahoma winters aren't very brutal. someone post and give me a peace of mind so i stop worrying.

I would fill with RV anti-freeze, scaling rust can be a problem and extra protection is good. I would also spray the entire engine and whatever else that is metal with a good rust preventative like the stuff they use on jet skis. I used "KawaChem Jet Ski lube" on my old prostar 205 frequently even during the summer months after every use and never saw one bit of corrosion. Yamaha also makes a good product too. An ounce of prevention is worth more than a ton of money.

butter
11-17-2006, 11:29 PM
This is probably a minority view, but I believe backfilling with anti-freeze is unnecessary. Yes, it can give additional peace of mind iwith respect to freeze damage, and perhaps some measure of rust-prevention in the cooling passages. However, in my own 15+ years experience of boat ownership, I have never used anti-freeze, nor have I seen it recommended in an owner's manual as more than an optional procedure. The owner's manual for my current '92 doesn't even mention the use of antifreeze in the winterization section. I think you will be fine just to leave the plugs open, as long as you are certain you opened ALL of them.

No offense intended to those who use antifreeze, as I can appreciate and understand your reasons for doing so. Just wanted to offer a different point of view.

Archimedes
11-18-2006, 12:30 AM
Just had my winterization done today and they only drained the block/manifolds, but they told me they put the plugs back in. Sounded odd to me, as I recall leaving them out on my ProStar, but that's what they told me. And no antifreeze.

Really depressing to winterize the boat. Don't think I'll do it next year.

EDIT: On a tangential note, is it just my dealer or do you guys have trouble getting a clear straight answer to anything when you call your dealer?

Chief
11-18-2006, 12:45 AM
Cast iron metal will rust real bad. Would you run straight water in your daily driver? The motor in your boat cost twice as much so why not head off all that you can and prevent those water passages from rusting and clogging up down the road. Have you ever seen a engine that sits up and all the passages rust up? Spend the extra five dollars and do some preventative maintenance. That's why I'm going to install the closed loop cooling on my boat to prevent the rust in the motor. Just an opinion.

erkoehler
11-18-2006, 01:50 AM
Just had my winterization done today and they only drained the block/manifolds, but they told me they put the plugs back in. Sounded odd to me, as I recall leaving them out on my ProStar, but that's what they told me. And no antifreeze.

Really depressing to winterize the boat. Don't think I'll do it next year.

EDIT: On a tangential note, is it just my dealer or do you guys have trouble getting a clear straight answer to anything when you call your dealer?


nope..........

Jesus_Freak
11-18-2006, 06:20 AM
but what i was wondering will it be okay sitting outside for the winter with just the plugs pulled?

Regardless, you have to eventually get them back in. I would suggest a modification that Jim N taught me. Instead of the plugs, you install brass knipple fittings into your manifolds. The piece going into your manifold is a normal 3/4" pipe thread, but the other side of the fitting is a jagged edge for hose clamping. Between these two manifold fittings, run a heater hose connection across the back of your block. Then each year, when it is time to drain those manifolds, just loosen either of the two new hose clamps and voila.

Foiler
11-18-2006, 07:51 AM
I'm with Butter, In fact my 93 has the LT1 with aluminum heads. RV antifreeze is a definite no no because of corrosion.
.

Doug G
11-18-2006, 09:22 AM
[/B]


nope..........

:rolleyes: Well I hope you don't . My dealer is great. No problems like that.

I live in PA so it has the pink stuff and is in my heated garage for the winter. Although I have not sprayed the exterior of the engine. Interesting thought. I may do that one.

bigmac
11-18-2006, 09:38 AM
My dealer drains the block and manifolds, then sucks in -100 propylene glycol antifreeze. That's different than the -50 RV antifreeze, which is designed for drinking water systems in RVs...the -100 stuff contains rust inhibitors.

-100 Marine antifreeze (http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/producte/10001/-1/10001/264990/0/0/propylene%20gluycol/All_2/mode+matchallpartial/0/0)

http://images.westmarine.com/full/208341.jpg

BriEOD
11-18-2006, 09:41 AM
We don't have that problem in West-Central Florida.

bigmac
11-18-2006, 09:56 AM
We don't have that problem in West-Central Florida.You mean you guys don't have to winterize your boats there in Florida?

Upper Michigan Prostar190
11-18-2006, 10:26 AM
This should have been reported in the "official my boat is winterized" thread8p 8p 8p DONTCHANO!

east tx skier
11-18-2006, 11:49 AM
Cast iron metal will rust real bad. Would you run straight water in your daily driver? The motor in your boat cost twice as much so why not head off all that you can and prevent those water passages from rusting and clogging up down the road. Have you ever seen a engine that sits up and all the passages rust up? Spend the extra five dollars and do some preventative maintenance. That's why I'm going to install the closed loop cooling on my boat to prevent the rust in the motor. Just an opinion.

There will be rust. But in a 92, there's already rust in there if I had to guess. There's some rust in mine, too. I look at using antifreeze is a matter of personal preference, especially in places where it doesn't stay frozen for long. If it provides a person additional comfort, more power to them. I've not used it in my boat for three years (since I stopped having it dealer winterized) and it has run like a top for me (knocks wood). When I mentioned antifreeze to my boat mechanic, he said that they did it because they are winterizing lots of boats and it's a CYA for them, but that I should not worry with it. I have yet to worry about problems during layup. But again, for all you guys who like to use antifreeze, more power to you.

BB02, in addition to what you've done, I would suggest that you pull the kill switch and turn the engine over to expel any water in the pump body.

east tx skier
11-18-2006, 11:50 AM
My dealer drains the block and manifolds, then sucks in -100 propylene glycol antifreeze. That's different than the -50 RV antifreeze, which is designed for drinking water systems in RVs...the -100 stuff contains rust inhibitors.

-100 Marine antifreeze (http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/producte/10001/-1/10001/264990/0/0/propylene%20gluycol/All_2/mode+matchallpartial/0/0)

http://images.westmarine.com/full/208341.jpg

I recall reading somewhere that the pink stuff didn't have rust inhibitors. Maybe it was another Big Mac post. :)

east tx skier
11-18-2006, 11:51 AM
:rolleyes: Well I hope you don't . My dealer is great. No problems like that.

I live in PA so it has the pink stuff and is in my heated garage for the winter. Although I have not sprayed the exterior of the engine. Interesting thought. I may do that one.

I've been using a silicone lubricant on my engine at layup for the past couple of years. Avoid the belts.

Chief
11-18-2006, 11:52 AM
You mean you guys don't have to winterize your boats there in Florida?

Nope, You never know when that nice tropical day will come and it comes often. Not unrealistic to take the boat out four to five times a month in the months of Dec, Jan, Feb. Not be mistaken, it does get pretty cold in those months but rarely below freezing.

I do put her in layup when I have to deploy or when I know shes going to have to sit for a month or two.

east tx skier
11-18-2006, 11:54 AM
Regardless, you have to eventually get them back in. I would suggest a modification that Jim N taught me. Instead of the plugs, you install brass knipple fittings into your manifolds. The piece going into your manifold is a normal 3/4" pipe thread, but the other side of the fitting is a jagged edge for hose clamping. Between these two manifold fittings, run a heater hose connection across the back of your block. Then each year, when it is time to drain those manifolds, just loosen either of the two new hose clamps and voila.

How much constriction is there on these nipple fittings? If the inside of your manifolds aren't rust free, I'd be a bit concerned about their getting clogged. I guess you should be able to tell by the rush of the water (and I know Indmar was using these for a while), but I'm a fan of doing away with petcocks and the like altogether in favor of brass plugs so I can be sure the drains aren't blocked in any way.

bigmac
11-18-2006, 12:06 PM
Nope, You never know when that nice tropical day will come and it comes often. Not unrealistic to take the boat out four to five times a month in the months of Dec, Jan, Feb. Not be mistaken, it does get pretty cold in those months but rarely below freezing.

I do put her in layup when I have to deploy or when I know shes going to have to sit for a month or two.

;) .............