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roddydog
11-13-2006, 08:28 PM
Finally got my ACL done on the 3rd of Nov. Should be rid of the crutches within a couple of weeks and I'll be ready for ski season in the spring.

Darn it's puffy and achy right now, but I know it won't last.

Things are a little slower right now, which is good.......right?:)

Leroy
11-14-2006, 12:16 AM
Best wishes on a speedy and complete recovery.

If you have to have it done now is a good time.

tex
11-14-2006, 12:21 AM
Good luck Roddy!

tommcat
11-14-2006, 09:14 AM
rod, did they tell you to keep it moving as much as possible or are you in a locked brace?

#47of100TeamMC
11-14-2006, 09:24 AM
Rod, I'm having mine done on Nov.20th 6days away. Which procedure did you choose? Patellar graft, Hamstring Graft, allograft(cadaver)? I'm also looking forward to my surgery and being able to get back on 2 feet for next spring. are they telling you 6 months recovery? Seems like an eternity...

vogelm1
11-14-2006, 01:11 PM
Roddy - had mine done Sept 22nd (patellar tendon graft), so in the same boat as you. Yeah, those first two weeks kinda suck - crutches, can't get around much. But you will be surprised at the progress you'll make around the 4 week mark. I'm at 7 weeks, and my PT has me jogging on the treadmill, doing single leg hops, and leg presses on the weight machine. Everyone heals/progresses at different rates, but if you follow advice of your PT and do exactly what they say, you'll be fine. My knee is still plenty puffy, but goes down a little each day. Did you have a Continuous Passive Motion Machine after surgery? My doc elected not to and it took me just a bit longer to get range of motion, but assured me I wouldn't get behind if I did my exercises and worked hard in PT. So far he is right. How is your range of motion? I'm stuck at 130 degrees and having a heck of a time increasing (good leg is 140 degrees as reference). I'm on the plateau and think the last few degrees will eventually come (hopefully).

#47 - you'll be really glad you had the surgery. I was very anxious about it and all went well. You may have some knee pain the day after. My femoral block wore off and mistake I made was not staying ahead of the pain with meds. Didn't think I'd need them because everything was feeling good when leg was numb. Eventually, I got ahead of it again, and that was short-lived. Take the pills as prescribed, whether you think you need them or not. The 6 month rehab is full return to sport. Takes some time for bone grafts to heal. You'll be pretty active a few weeks after surgery. Just hang in there the first two weeks or so. You won't be getting around much and focus is to keep swelling and pain to a minimum. But after that, things will progress - probably faster than you think they should. Hard to be patient. Good luck on your recovery guys!:toast:

tommcat
11-14-2006, 01:39 PM
patellar graft is the strongest but also the longest recovery time. i had it done that way and was back for my first hockey practice exactly 3 months after surgery. just work hard with PT and you can cut recovery time in half

barefoot
11-14-2006, 02:12 PM
I've gone through both the Patellar and Hamstring grafts on the right knee. Patellar first and proceeded to tare it out 6 months later. The Ham went in next and it has held solid for almost 10 years.

One thing that hurts like h ll, but will benefit you greatly is doing straight leg hangs. That’s the one where you lay on your belly and hang your knee off a table, bed, ect. to extend the muscles in the back of your leg. I spent a lot of time with my knee bend, icing it and the like, and the muscles back there get really tight if you don't use them.

roddydog
11-14-2006, 02:55 PM
Thanks all,. 47, Tomcat and Vogel. Mine was also a patellar graft and for the first week I had a removable splint on it (the block basically renders your quads useless). I started doing stuff at home on the sat. and sun., hamstring stretch, pulling your heel to your butt while on your back and doing the same sitting up but pulling your heel with a strap, then went straight into Physio on the Monday after surgery on Friday, so you get it moving as fast as you can. I didn't have the CPM machine either but it seems to be progressing well.
I'm at about 120 degrees and I can walk up the stairs at home, I don't use the splint anymore but I still wrap it in a tensor.
It's pretty amazing, I have a 2" scar below my knee cap (where they got the graft) and 2 little scars on either side of the cap where the scope went.
Off to ice it.

roddydog
11-14-2006, 02:59 PM
Oh and yes, six months for FULL knitting of the graft into the bone, good luck with it 47:toast:

vogelm1
11-14-2006, 03:19 PM
Sounds like you're doing great! You must be working hard and doing everything they say. Keep up the good work. We'll all be ready to hit it next season.

tommcat
11-14-2006, 07:13 PM
One thing that hurts like h ll, but will benefit you greatly is doing straight leg hangs. Thatís the one where you lay on your belly and hang your knee off a table, bed, ect. to extend the muscles in the back of your leg.my physical terrorist took it one step further. while lying on my belly he supported my upper leg with pads and pushed down on my heel to bend my knee backwards. some of the worst pain i've felt yet:mad:

tex
11-14-2006, 09:29 PM
Rod, I'm having mine done on Nov.20th 6days away. Which procedure did you choose? Patellar graft, Hamstring Graft, allograft(cadaver)? I'm also looking forward to my surgery and being able to get back on 2 feet for next spring. are they telling you 6 months recovery? Seems like an eternity...

My PT would almost make me cry multiple times a session. For the record(Sorry Gene)-I had patellar graft, hamstring graft, and 2 dead dudes shoved into my knee. I guess that's why the doc says next summer may be a wash too! Good luck to everyone!

#47of100TeamMC
11-15-2006, 10:28 AM
Did the Surgeon give you a choice as to what you preferred for a course of procedure? I went to one surgeon who was going to do the patellar graft. She(not a typ-o) insisted on the Patellar graft. Taking the center 60% of the patellar tendon. stitching the outer pieces back together. She claims very good success with this procedure. So I asked her, What about using a cadaver? She explained "I have done that in the past but only on someone who really doesn't want a ~2" scar on the front of their knee cap, and who is into activity where you need precise stability in your knee such as a balarina for instance." I said, "why wouldn't everybody want that sort of stability post-op?" her rebuttle was, "I've done the patellar graft on professional soccer players and they are very happy with the results after playing again".
So it got me thinking... and searching for answers. The patellar tendon is the tendon which straightens your leg. (for example, your sitting in a chair legs bent at 90deg. feet on the floor. and you flex your quad to get your leg parallel to the floor, that's the patellar tendon) and I thought to myself, Why would one want to weaken that movement to replace the ACL?
I went to another surgeon for a 2nd opinion. (this is the guy who put pins in my broken finger, also put a plate and screws in my clavicle) his thoughts were along the same lines as mine. Why weaken a part of the knee to strengthen another. His preference was the cadaver or the hamstring. He told me the biggest reason why most surgeons don't do the cadaver more often is because of the "your gonna put a piece of a dead guy in my knee" factor the patients get from hearing "CADAVER". When in actuality the risk factor of having a tendon from a cadaver put in to your knee as an ACL is slight no non-existent. reason being, When a soft tissue is used in a transplant there is no time to test for disease, AIDS, HEP-C, because soft tissue dies once out of the body so it must be transplanted IMMEDIATELY. where as the tendon they take from a cadaver, is not a soft tissue, therefore, they have time to harvest the tendon and quarentine it while they test the cadaver for things such as AIDS and HEP-C.

Anyway, having said all that. It seems that any route you take has had very good success. This surgery has come a long way in the last 5yrs or so. and given ample recovery and PT time we all should be hunting buoys again come april... I'll probably be soo bored next week and the following that I'll be able to give a daily report with pictures hopefully on my recovery. I'm sure that knee will be HUGE.

2 for 1:
I'm also having my plate and screws taken out of my clavicle at the same time. It's being really bothersome lately, and the old lady has hit her chin on it a few times when she gives me a hug and what not. Not to mention the fact that my arm goes numb if I work over my head. and also a seatbelt that rubs on it funny is a little painful because of the sharp corners. of the plate. (this deserves pics doesn't it... I'll make a point to take before and after pics)

vogelm1
11-15-2006, 12:56 PM
#47 - you did the right thing in getting a 2nd opinion. I did same and both were doing patellars regularly. One works exclusively in sports medicine at UW Hospital. My ortho here in town was 'most comfortable' doing the patellar graft, and I really didn't get a choice. He has done many and observed the outcomes - he also helped author papers in the research of this. He told me the patellar was the "Gold Standard" in grafts and the strongest of the bunch, and his answers pretty much paralleled the guy's at UW. I was comfortable with that. The patellar tendon will regenerate, and in some cases a second graft can be harvested, if needed, down the road (according to some research I read). For me, they took the 10mm section from the middle - it ended up being more like 1/3 of the tendon. I do a lot of running and was worried about future tendonitis, or weakness. He assured me if I followed the PT protocol and did what I was told everything would be fine. So far after 7 weeks he's right on the money. There are olympic athletes that go through all this and return to compete at the same level - if I end up half as good, I'd call that a success.

Regarding the dead guy parts...one thing I read is that the tissue breaks down and can end up being a weaker ligament in the end, compared to your own tissue. There were also issues of donor part rejections along with the sterility. I suppose to eliminate any of that, most surgeons will use the patellar autograft method. All the methods work, but everything points to patellar as having the edge in strength.

Good luck with the surgery and keep us posted. It's nice to be on this side of it now, but I can honestly say the pre-op and surgery itself was no big deal at all (and I'm a needle and pain wuss - haven't even had a blood draw in my 40 years!). Your knee shouldn't get that huge, but all the little dimples in it will definitely be filled in. You'll do great. Any of us active types I think should EXPECT a good outcome.

sand2snow22
11-15-2006, 01:18 PM
"Regarding the dead guy parts...one thing I read is that the tissue breaks down and can end up being a weaker ligament in the end, compared to your own tissue."

This is what my surgeon said. I had my right ACL repaired 13 years ago and my left 9 years ago. Got an infection on the first one and almost died!! My brother had his ACL repaired about 8 years ago and just had 50% of his medial meniscus cut out. Doc also cleaned up his reconstructed ACL patella tendon graft while he was in there, I guess they shred a little over time. Thus, the dead guy concerns.

#47of100TeamMC
11-15-2006, 03:45 PM
I haven't heard of anything whre the Dead guy parts end up being weaker in the end... I do hear however that the Tendon they take from the cadaver is about 2-2.5times bigger than the hamstring graft and almost 3 times bigger than the patellar graft. So it's supposed to be better than new post-op.

Also, With the patellar graft, I was told by the surgeon that after surgery I would be in a hip-to-ankle brace for 10days-2weeks. Compared to the cadaver where that surgeon told me, "i've seen people walk out of the building to their cars" being it's outpatient surgery. "But you should probably use crutches for a day or 2 just to be safe" AND i go see the Physical Terrorist the next day. 30hrs after I start the surgery. All these factors brought me to my decisioin.

Like everything these days. There probably isn't a wrong decision in this case. Many methods have produced very acceptable results. Thanks for the best wishes, and I'll hope for the best and pray for the better.

bigmac
11-15-2006, 04:13 PM
Indeed, the patellar graft is the gold standard, but hamstring and cadaver-donor grafts have their strong points too.

IMHO, the job of the surgeon is to detail ALL of the options and list for the patient the pros and cons, risks, and potential complications of any particular surgical approach, allowing the patient to make the appropriate choice, with guidance from the surgeon based on the particular patient. Unfortunately, that doesn't always happen. Surgeons can get entrenched in a particular approach, or in some cases even biased by the free windbreaker that a particular device company has just given them. This is less of a problem than it used to be, but can still be a factor.

Most surgeons these days (not all) like it when patients come in having researched their particular condition, but there are still a LOT of people who just say "whatever you think is best, Doc...". That research can be a two-edged sword, however, as most of it tends to come from the internet and there is a LOT of whacko medical stuff out there. The other problem is that patients also can get entrenched in a particular approach based on anecdotes from the internet, friends, or family members and will see their surgeon demanding the same operation that their wife's sister's friend's brother-in-law had because it worked well for them, or an operative experience they read about on a inboard boating forum.

Education by the patients is the key, but there are indeed surgeons that will just arrogantly dismiss a patient's questions. Second opinions are always a good idea if the patient is uncomfortable, or isn't getting the education, discussion or options they want to hear.

#47of100TeamMC
11-15-2006, 04:20 PM
well said bigmac.

I've talked to more than just the 2 surgeons I spoke about, and 2 of them said flat out... "this is the procedure I do" not asking if I had a preference or anything. When asking about taking out my plate and screws from the clavicle at the same time. I even had one dr. say... "I won't do it at the same time." So I asked why? and was shocked to hear the response of..."because the insurance company gives themselves a discount for doing 2 surgeries at once. I'll do them both, but we'll seperate them by a week or so" That I couldn't believe. needless to say... I didn't call them back. Only in it for the money. and to get as much as they can from whom ever they can.

bigmac
11-15-2006, 04:52 PM
When asking about taking out my plate and screws from the clavicle at the same time. I even had one dr. say... "I won't do it at the same time." So I asked why? and was shocked to hear the response of..."because the insurance company gives themselves a discount for doing 2 surgeries at once. I'll do them both, but we'll seperate them by a week or so" That I couldn't believe. needless to say... I didn't call them back. Only in it for the money. and to get as much as they can from whom ever they can.

This will be an unpopular opinion I suspect, but here's a different take on that.

That was unusually candid of that surgeon to tell you that even though it's a pretty commonly held policy by most surgeons in varying degrees and in some cases. The "discount" he was referring to was, at a minimum, 50%. In many cases, the insurance company won't pay anything for that second concurrent operation, even though it takes extra time (time is money) and extra liability risk. They will label it as being a "necessary part of the primary procedure", which is ridiculous. The surgeon can appeal that, but have you ever tried to deal with your insurance company? That surgeon doesn't gain any increased efficiency from the fact that you're already on the table. That hardware removal is a completely different operation. It takes the same amount of time it would take 2 weeks later, costs him the same amount, yet he gets paid half or less. To be sure, there are cases where the surgeon has no ethical option but to go ahead do both, such as taking out a diseased gallbladder discovered at the same as taking out a colon cancer, for example, but an elective harware removal done concomitantly only for your convenience...well, I'm glad you found someone who would do it at the same time. That was generous of him.

(...donning Nomex coveralls...)

#47of100TeamMC
11-15-2006, 04:58 PM
I completely see that side of it as well. and me in his shoes, I would be thinking the same thing. But probably wouldn't have expressed it. All that aside, we chose to go elsewhere not solely because of that incident but because this particular surgeon wasn't open to any other modes of operation and wanted to do the hamstring graft or nothing as well. So we opted to keep looking elsewhere and get different opinions.

atlfootr
11-15-2006, 05:09 PM
Finally got my ACL done on the 3rd of Nov. :)Been there, done that :(
Had 2 Arthoscopic ALC's repairs performed @ the same time, each injury were a year apart :rolleyes:
Now both knees = Better than new! :)

bigmac
11-15-2006, 05:19 PM
Been there, done that :(
Had 2 ALC's repairs performed @ the same time, each injury were a year apart :rolleyes: Now both knees = Better than new! :)I have three partners who are orthopedists. The local hospital here is a major joint replacement center in this area and they do a lot of total knee replacements. Knees tend to wear out at the same time, but most orthopedists will only fix one knee at a time. My partners buck the trend in that they are very willing to replace both knees at the same time (when necessary:) ). I can tell you, that costs them a lot of money, but they happen to be believers that a bilateral knee replacement patient will do better than doing each knee 6 months apart because the patient who has both replaced has no option but to get up and get moving. No limping around for them. Those patients recover more quickly and have less total downtime by several months. I've always admired that about those guys.

vogelm1
11-15-2006, 05:37 PM
Indeed, the patellar graft is the gold standard, but hamstring and cadaver-donor grafts have their strong points too.

IMHO, the job of the surgeon is to detail ALL of the options and list for the patient the pros and cons, risks, and potential complications of any particular surgical approach, allowing the patient to make the appropriate choice, with guidance from the surgeon based on the particular patient. Unfortunately, that doesn't always happen. Surgeons can get entrenched in a particular approach, or in some cases even biased by the free windbreaker that a particular device company has just given them. This is less of a problem than it used to be, but can still be a factor.

Most surgeons these days (not all) like it when patients come in having researched their particular condition, but there are still a LOT of people who just say "whatever you think is best, Doc...". That research can be a two-edged sword, however, as most of it tends to come from the internet and there is a LOT of whacko medical stuff out there. The other problem is that patients also can get entrenched in a particular approach based on anecdotes from the internet, friends, or family members and will see their surgeon demanding the same operation that their wife's sister's friend's brother-in-law had because it worked well for them, or an operative experience they read about on a inboard boating forum.

Education by the patients is the key, but there are indeed surgeons that will just arrogantly dismiss a patient's questions. Second opinions are always a good idea if the patient is uncomfortable, or isn't getting the education, discussion or options they want to hear.

Yep, that should be the way it goes and one shouldn't get the impression you're 'bothering' them with your questions. I know that happens a lot. Each individual has to make the decision for themselves, but I think it does help (and even comfort) one to hear what other's have had done and how the surgery turned out. I guess the best thing is to avoid getting injured in the first place, but stuff happens. Regardless, we'll all hopefully get repaired right and be hitting the water next season.

bigmac
11-15-2006, 06:00 PM
Been there, done that :(
Had 2 Arthoscopic ALC's repairs performed @ the same time, each injury were a year apart
Now both knees = Better than new! :)My...those are attractive knees. Thanks for posting them, but especially thanks for not posting the whole picture that this one was cropped from...:D :D

tommcat
11-15-2006, 06:36 PM
after talking to a number of surgeons, physical therapists and pro hockey trainers before i did mine i found the main reason for not using dead guy parts is tissue breakdown while waiting to be implanted into you and they also tend to stretch and need to be tightened up if worked hard. the patellar tendon most closely replicates a ligament in stretch and strength.

they all seemed to be of the opinion that the patellar graft is strongest for people involved in impact sports like hockey. the only real downside anyone brought up in regards to it is that once you take out the tendon you cant do it again if you tear it again. plus the scar and extended recovery time.

atlfootr
11-15-2006, 10:11 PM
My...those are attractive knees. Thanks for posting them, but especially thanks for not posting the whole picture that this one was cropped from...:D :DI thought, we were comparing scars and sharing stories.
The wifey :love: my knees.
And bigmac, FYI I only took a knee shot nothing else :rolleyes:

BGcraft
11-16-2006, 01:13 AM
Patellar graft ACL repair back in March of this year...

The insights, thoughts, advice above are spot on. Of course, debating the merits of which repair method is better will keep you up nights.

One last tip I would pass along to the "knee crowd" is to resist the urge, say 3-4 months post-op, to get real aggressive with your repaired knee...up-ing your PT, heavy reps, workouts, cardio etc. Can tell you your mind/knee will trick you into being ready to soon. Suffered through some needless soreness by pushing it too much...which probably even set me back several days.

I found the most frustrating part of "getting back" was being patient.

6-7 months later- I can honestly say my repaired knee does feel as good as new and is something I am no longer mindful of.

And damn where was this post & honeypot of info. 6 months ago! Would have been nice to research skis and knees at the same time.

All the best to you guys.

sand2snow22
11-16-2006, 02:03 AM
[QUOTE=BGcraft]say 3-4 months post-op, to get real aggressive with your repaired knee...up-ing your PT, heavy reps, workouts, cardio etc. Can tell you your mind/knee will trick you into being ready to soon. Suffered through some needless soreness by pushing it too much...which probably even set me back several days. I found the most frustrating part of "getting back" was being patient.
QUOTE]


Yes, mine seemed to swell up on me if I pushed too hard early....

tommcat
11-16-2006, 08:30 AM
So playing hockey 3 months after surgery was probably not a great idea?;)

roddydog
11-22-2006, 06:03 PM
Not gonna push it. I want to ski next summer and Board next winter without any problems.

Great responses from all, very informative,
Thanks

vogelm1
05-23-2007, 12:03 AM
So how are you ACL repair guys doing?? I'm coming up on 9 months post-surgery and it feels like I have a ways to go yet, strength-wise. I've wakeboarded a few times now and I sure wouldn't be able to do a wake jump or anything like that...lucky to ollie up the board a little. Is this pretty typical for those of you who've been through it? My PT says it could take up to a full year+ to have things feel "normal". Being 41 probably doesn't help much either? I just want to hear that I'll be able to slalom and foot yet this season. If not, I guess it's not the end of the world, but it would be nice.:D

tex
05-23-2007, 12:07 AM
I'm 42 and tore my acl, pcl, and mcl last year. Bad deal is I broke my condyle part of the femur where it attaches to the knee this weekend. My advice is to put a personal trainer together with your physical therapist. When I did this my recovery speeded up a ton! Good luck!

atlfootr
05-23-2007, 12:22 AM
I had 2 :(, one on each knee and each one tore a year apart.:mad:
Ironically, had surgery performed on both - same day :)

Man, the morifin was GREAT :D

onewheat
05-23-2007, 12:55 AM
I had my ACL done last March (Patellar graft) and a bit of meniscus removed. I am now 41 and 14 months post-op, feel nowhere near the way I did pre-injury. I have a lot of popping in my knee (noisy, but usually no pain) and was told it is ligaments over scar tissue. I am very tentative with it. I will wake surf, ride my quad or mountain bike and other easy things (no lateral knee stress). I have been up on a wake board once, but did not feel comfortable doing much but crossing wakes easily. I occasionally get a swollen knee for some reason. I have not jogged, run around with my dogs or anything I feel would stress my knee unduly. It just freaks me out now. Tearing my knee up was probably the most painful thing I have done to myself. Breaking bones is nothing like a torn ligament and I have broken more than a couple of them.

tommcat
05-23-2007, 11:28 AM
i was back to hockey practice 3 months after surgery(against doc orders) and it felt good.

vogelm1
05-23-2007, 11:34 AM
I'm 42 and tore my acl, pcl, and mcl last year. Bad deal is I broke my condyle part of the femur where it attaches to the knee this weekend. My advice is to put a personal trainer together with your physical therapist. When I did this my recovery speeded up a ton! Good luck!

Yikes, same knee? Were you on the skis again since your reconstruction and have another crash? Hope all goes well. In my case, it sure feels nice to be on the water again, but I'm no where near pre-accident condition. I was just reviving this thread to see where folks were at, and if my rehab was similar in progress with others.

Roonie's
05-23-2007, 11:49 AM
Tore my ACL in 89. Had the hamstring graft done. One year after surgery I received my brown belt in Tae Kwon-Do which is a martial art that is a lot of kicking with your legs. Two years after surgery, I was doing competition freestyle downhill skiing and doing extreme cliff jumping. Also starting mtn bike racing which only hurt it after long races. Then starting college crew which was the only sport that continually put pressure on it and it started to hurt alot. I think it was due to the tendons rubbing over the implanted screws with each pull. My knee will hurt now if I do a full day of bump downhill skiing or long ski days. I have never really run on it since they took out a lot of cushioning and I don't want arthritis when I am older. My wife has done marathons but I refuse to run on it. I have done the eliptical machines as they are low impact and I will bike. I would say my knee is stronger than before but I am also much more cautious with it. Knee injuries are no fun.

#47of100TeamMC
05-23-2007, 11:58 AM
6 months for my ACL repair was 3 days ago. had the 6mo. checkup with the Surgeon. he said "your good to go" I said, "what does that mean" he said. "Your as good as new, it'll take a severe situation just like the first time to tear it again at this point" So... I can tell you how it feels... It feels really good, Although mentally I'm still aware after babying it for all last summer and this winter. I ran and jogged for the first time in 6 months this week. Did some Jumping exercises and I can honestly say, my timidness is COMPLETELY mental. The knee has perfect stability and I feel great!
Best thing I've ever done was get it taken care of. Anybody want a reference for a really great surgeon!?

tex
05-23-2007, 12:17 PM
Yikes, same knee? Were you on the skis again since your reconstruction and have another crash? Hope all goes well. In my case, it sure feels nice to be on the water again, but I'm no where near pre-accident condition. I was just reviving this thread to see where folks were at, and if my rehab was similar in progress with others.
Same knee. Doctor had given me the ok to sky ski and foot in a straight line(no tricks). It was just a freak accident.

vogelm1
05-23-2007, 12:34 PM
Tore my ACL in 89. Had the hamstring graft done. One year after surgery I received my brown belt in Tae Kwon-Do which is a martial art that is a lot of kicking with your legs. Two years after surgery, I was doing competition freestyle downhill skiing and doing extreme cliff jumping. Also starting mtn bike racing which only hurt it after long races. Then starting college crew which was the only sport that continually put pressure on it and it started to hurt alot. I think it was due to the tendons rubbing over the implanted screws with each pull. My knee will hurt now if I do a full day of bump downhill skiing or long ski days. I have never really run on it since they took out a lot of cushioning and I don't want arthritis when I am older. My wife has done marathons but I refuse to run on it. I have done the eliptical machines as they are low impact and I will bike. I would say my knee is stronger than before but I am also much more cautious with it. Knee injuries are no fun.

Sounds like you did well with yours...that is the kind of luck I hope to have with mine. I didn't have any meniscus damage so should be OK, with the cushioning part. Running on it does feel good and stable, but was surprised how tentative I felt with it on the wakeboard. Different muscles that haven't been used since the injury maybe.

chico
09-18-2009, 04:38 PM
Anyone had knee surgery,like a meniscus tear?

jdl xstar
09-18-2009, 05:00 PM
Blown the ACL in both knees. Repaired both. Luckily no meniscus damage.

captain planet
09-18-2009, 05:06 PM
I tore my meniscus about 5 years ago playing soccer. I didn't have surgery and rehabbed it.

Tanski
09-18-2009, 07:06 PM
I had the cartilage from my knee rip off from my femur. Had surgery to screw it back into place. They also repaired cartilage damage. Back on my feet in a couple weeks, playing hockey in two months. Took about 4 months to completely recover.

woftam
09-18-2009, 07:45 PM
Yes, what do you want to know?

mattsn
09-18-2009, 08:05 PM
ACL in both knees, one at age 16 and the other at age 45. One knee has been totally replaced. Now age 66 and doing well in that department although no skiing.

My advice:

Work out and strengthen as much as possible BEFORE surgery. Rehab like mad after, don't let the Dr tell you to do it on your own. Go to a PT and have a program.

Best advice. Strengthen and avoid as long as possible.

Good luck.

brucemac
09-18-2009, 09:11 PM
+1 what mattsn said.

ROB
09-18-2009, 09:16 PM
My wife is currently rehabbing from a meniscus surgery (3 small tears). She is on her 9th physical therapy visit. She is getting better all the time. My wife feels that the surgery was worth the pain and rehab.

chico
09-18-2009, 11:16 PM
I had a meniscus tear 36 years ago playing hockey,every once in a while my knee would lock,last week something tore while skiing now it is locking up a lot,going to see the doc on monday.Might be time for some surgery.

nitro5238
09-19-2009, 12:49 AM
Tore my meniscus in left knee last year. Pretty good amount of pain initially but I had surgery and was back to 100% in only 4 1/2 to 5 weeks. Just be sure to follow up with all of your prescribed re-hab visits and you will be fine.

chico
09-19-2009, 09:08 AM
Thanks for the replys,I guess an mri is in order.

bigmac
09-19-2009, 09:23 AM
Most cartilage tears in the knee will only get worse - rehab is less likely than ACL damage to be helpful if a meniscus is damaged mainly because cartilage has poor blood supply, so there isn't much healing. Sometimes, a torn cartilage can be attached back down to the top of the tibia and it may heal to some extent, but it's not a particularly durable repair and in most cases will require an arthroscopy later in order to finally remove the torn piece. This is useful mostly for small tears in younger patients who are not overweight and who have good quadricep function.

An MRI can be helpful in determining the extent of the cartilage damage, but ultimately the type of repair can only be ascertained at arthroscopy. If the MRI does show cartilage damage, the next step is very likely to be arthoscopy with either repair of the tear, a cadaver allograft, or removal of the torn piece.

tex
09-19-2009, 12:40 PM
Torn mcl/pcl/acl on right knee. A year later broke the medial condyle bone off the femur where it goes into the same knee. Not fun. Go to PT!

jdl xstar
09-19-2009, 03:22 PM
Right knee allograft a year ago almost to the day (off balance double up landing). Good as new now. Recover is much easier than the patella graft I had done on my left knee in '96. (bad backside roll landing).

51936

bigmac
09-19-2009, 11:54 PM
Cartilage, not ligaments. Whole different ballgame.

tex
09-20-2009, 08:17 AM
1st one! ACL/PCL/MCL

tex
09-20-2009, 08:19 AM
2nd-Medial condyle