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h2oskirs
10-31-2006, 12:16 PM
I am in the process of looking for land to purchase and dig a lake. One question I have never seen answered, how do you fill the lake? When you dig, are you hoping to hit a natural spring, do you dig a well and pump? How do most do it?

Any body out there who has gone through this process? Any trouble keeping the water level up during summer droughts?

Thanks

trickskier
10-31-2006, 12:20 PM
I am in the process of looking for land to purchase and dig a lake. One question I have never seen answered, how do you fill the lake? When you dig, are you hoping to hit a natural spring, do you dig a well and pump? How do most do it?

Any body out there who has gone through this process? Any trouble keeping the water level up during summer droughts?

Thanks

If you're in Florida you will not have to dig very deep to hit water. Depends on where you are and how deep the water table is. I think you biggest issue may be environmentally. That's a lot of earth to move. Good Luck on you venture.

shepherd
10-31-2006, 12:21 PM
Interesting question. Hopefully somebody in the know will reply. In my uninformed opinion, I would think that the best way to do it would be to buy some property with a creek running through it. Dig your hole, divert the creek to your lake, and when your lake fills up, open the other end. A side benefit would be the water would constantly refresh itself. Now, you may run into some legal issues regarding riparian rights of the property owners downstream of you, as well as expected environmental issues/permits.

east tx skier
10-31-2006, 12:25 PM
I am in the process of looking for land to purchase and dig a lake. One question I have never seen answered, how do you fill the lake? When you dig, are you hoping to hit a natural spring, do you dig a well and pump? How do most do it?

Any body out there who has gone through this process? Any trouble keeping the water level up during summer droughts?

Thanks

Some have wells ($$$). Some are spring fed (lucky). Some are run-off reliant. The run off lakes are subject to drought and tend to be dug pretty deep. The lake we go to for ski school is a run off lake. It is 12' out to the balls and they have never missed a ski day. But it was really low this year.

milkmania
10-31-2006, 12:27 PM
Now, you may run into some legal issues regarding riparian rights of the property owners downstream of you, as well as expected environmental issues/permits.

danged big words:rant:

gonna have to google that one:o



edit:
well, I'll be danged....
Under the riparian principle, all landowners whose property is adjacent to a body of water have the right to make reasonable use of it. If there is not enough water to satisfy all users, allotments are generally fixed in proportion to frontage on the water source. These rights cannot be sold or transferred other than with the adjoining land, and water cannot be transferred out of the watershed.

Danimal
10-31-2006, 12:35 PM
Here's a pretty good article in WaterSki Mag

http://www.waterskimag.com/article.jsp?ID=4710

#47of100TeamMC
10-31-2006, 12:37 PM
Interesting question. Hopefully somebody in the know will reply. In my uninformed opinion, I would think that the best way to do it would be to buy some property with a creek running through it. Dig your hole, divert the creek to your lake, and when your lake fills up, open the other end. A side benefit would be the water would constantly refresh itself. Now, you may run into some legal issues regarding riparian rights of the property owners downstream of you, as well as expected environmental issues/permits.

I've heard issues with allowing your lake to be in-line with a river. the main issue being sediment depositing itself on your lake bottom and over time your lake could be too shallow to be usable until you had it dredged.

a better idea is to create a damn that simply diverts water into your lake like a holding pond. that way you can open/close it as necessary, and you don't have a constant current and sediment deposits.

We've all thought about a private lake and building it... where are you located? I've got a file cabinet full of research and plans and names of people from Property attorney's to excavators to you name it. maybe we could hook up and make it a joint effort... I have yet to get my ideas off the ground... still looking for the right spot. (i'm kinda picky)

Danimal
10-31-2006, 12:49 PM
This is an intersting article also. It contains some things to think about when planning your lake.

http://www.utoronto.ca/ski/water/faq/stmanmade.html

http://waterski.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=waterski&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.laku.com%2Fskilake.htm

Maristar210
10-31-2006, 01:08 PM
Anyone have an idea on total cost?

Would be interesting to see....

Steve

rodltg2
10-31-2006, 01:10 PM
most lakes here in nor cal are well fed. getting a well put in around here thats suitbale for filling the lake will be around $60K. try and find a property that already has one..

richardsoncd
10-31-2006, 03:10 PM
It all depends on what your local and state codes allow for. Here in Georgia there is a 50' state waters buffer that can not be disturbed except to put in a road. Generally all lakes have to be fed by a well or from stormwater runoff. Most municipalities I have worked for (mostly in the southeast) have the same requirements. Also, many areas are adopting water quality ordinances that requires water quality ponds to be installed as a pre-filter for runoff before it reaches a detention pond that will detain the water before reaching state waters. If you PM me where you are looking I can get you very detailed information....heck I'll even design it for you if I can come ski:D