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M-Funf
10-26-2006, 01:02 PM
Yeah, I know it's a month away, but I'm starting to think about Thanksgiving dinner...

I don't usually like to go the traditional route. I do most all of the cooking around our house, especially when it comes to holiday meals. For Thanksgivings past, I've done leg of Lamb, whole Salmon, Goose, Rabbit, and Prime Rib...

Anybody else have other alternatives to plain ol' turkey?

I'm thinking about a few this year:

Turducken (I've never done this one before)

Muscovy duck

Crab (if they don't hold up the season again)

I need some good ideas, TMC'ers!

Maristar210
10-26-2006, 01:10 PM
I have done the Standing rib roast along with a smaller turkey worked out well.

Some others I wanted to do no necessarily for Thanksgiving but you never know


Romano and peppercorn encrusted Mahi-Mahi or maybe

Crab stuffed chicken breasts with a garlic cream sauce


Mmmmmmmm lunch time yet?

Monte
10-26-2006, 01:11 PM
Ribs......... appetizer.....Pork shoulder or boston butt (slow smoked of course)

playtherapy
10-26-2006, 01:18 PM
We went to my son and daughter-in-laws last year (her first time to cook turkey). She had been so concerned about how to cook the turkey and dressing, and called everyone for tips. I assured her it would be fine. All the long, I had a great plan to put in effect. While she was setting the table and busy with other guest arriving, I told her I would check on the turkey. At that time I placed (a fully cooked) cornish hen up in the cavity of the turkey and then stuffed the big bird with her dressing. When it came time to carve, she got a big spoon and started taking the dressing out of the bird. She hit "something" hard. She kept diging and pulled out the cornish hen. I told Christy that she had cooked a pregnant bird. I thought she was gona cry. I wish you could have seen the look on her face! Priceless!

Monte
10-26-2006, 01:21 PM
We went to my son and daughter-in-laws last year (her first time to cook turkey). She had been so concerned about how to cook the turkey and dressing, and called everyone for tips. I assured her it would be fine. All the long, I had a great plan to put in effect. While she was setting the table and busy with other guest arriving, I told her I would check on the turkey. At that time I placed (a fully cooked) cornish hen up in the cavity of the turkey and then stuffed the big bird with her dressing. When it came time to carve, she got a big spoon and started taking the dressing out of the bird. She hit "something" hard. She kept diging and pulled out the cornish hen. I told Christy that she had cooked a pregnant bird. I thought she was gona cry. I wish you could have seen the look on her face! Priceless!

That's just plain mean:mad:

Danimal
10-26-2006, 01:32 PM
I have a recipe for a rabbit stuffed with sweet italian sausage and other stuff that I am making for a dinner party on the 4th on Nov. Let me see if I can dig it up for you. It's a traditional Tuscan dish.

Danimal
10-26-2006, 01:41 PM
Rabbit Cooked Like a Tuscan Pig: Coniglio in Porchetta

1 (4 1/2 pound) rabbit, head, tail and feet removed and gutted, liver reserved, have your butcher remove all of the bones from the rabbit for you.

1/2 cup lardo, or fat back
1/2 bulb fennel, cored and diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 links Italian sausage, removed from its casings
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup dry white wine
1 lemon, juiced
Coarse salt
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Season the inside and outside of the rabbit with pepper, and set aside.
In a 12 to 14-inch saute pan heat 4 tablespoons of the lardo until smoking. Add the fennel and the garlic and cook over medium heat until softened and light brown, about 5 to 6 minutes. Add the sausage and cook until just cooked, about 6 to 8 more minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
Stuff the rabbit cavity with the fennel, garlic, and the remaining lardo, cut into 1/8-inch dice. Truss the rabbit to seal the openings and place in a casserole. Baste with the wine and lemon juice, and sprinkle with the coarse salt.
Cook in the oven for 1 hour, turning once after 30 minutes of cooking, and occasionally basting with the pan juices. Remove from the oven, allow to sit 5 minutes. Serve in 1/2-inch slices with pan juices emulsified with extra virgin olive oil.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Yield: 6 servings

playtherapy
10-26-2006, 01:51 PM
Sounds yummy, what sides do you recommend?

Danimal
10-26-2006, 01:57 PM
Roasted vegtable mix (carrots, potatoes, onions, garlic cloves) are really good along with this and a nice mixed green salad with a very light raspberry vinagrette dressing.

Thank goodness it's almost lunch time! I'm hungry!

maristarman
10-26-2006, 02:24 PM
Pardon the rant....

:rant:

This is America.

We've only got a few truely "American" holidays left anymore.

Where is the sense of tradition?

Thanksgiving is all about 2 things:

1. Old Tom Turkey with all the fixins
2. Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys football games.

Pick some other day to make your stuffed rabbit high falutin meal.

CoFooter
10-26-2006, 02:27 PM
My buddy usually does a turducken every other year or so. Cooks it up in the deep fryer. Pretty good, but not that much of a difference than a Turkey.

trickskier
10-26-2006, 05:37 PM
Ribs......... appetizer.....Pork shoulder or boston butt (slow smoked of course)

That's the NC way! Ever eaten at Gary's Bar-B-Q in China Grove?

Chief
10-26-2006, 07:27 PM
Fried Turkey for the family and fire dept.

TMCNo1
10-26-2006, 09:33 PM
Pardon the rant....

:rant:

This is America.

We've only got a few truely "American" holidays left anymore.

Where is the sense of tradition?

Thanksgiving is all about 2 things:

1. Old Tom Turkey with all the fixins
2. Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys football games.

Pick some other day to make your stuffed rabbit high falutin meal.

Gene is that you?

suedv
10-26-2006, 11:21 PM
I want one of these guys. Crazy birds. I had to stop and wait for them to cross the road this morning while I was on my way to a meeting.

TX.X-30 fan
10-26-2006, 11:22 PM
Pardon the rant....

:rant:

This is America.

We've only got a few truely "American" holidays left anymore.

Where is the sense of tradition?

Thanksgiving is all about 2 things:

1. Old Tom Turkey with all the fixins
2. Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys football games.

Pick some other day to make your stuffed rabbit high falutin meal.


amen , but the rabbit sounds great

twieder
10-26-2006, 11:27 PM
Anyone inject their turkeys? I've done both (deep fried and baked) with marinades. Man what a differance! My personal favorite Cajun deep fried but I use commertal frier oil too.

maristarman
10-27-2006, 12:02 AM
Gene is that you?

Wow am I insulted. That hurt my feelings. :(

Gene complains about silly stuff.

I'm just being patriotic.

I'm kinda tired of hearing how everything traditionally "American" is wrong, or intolerant, or <fill in the blank>.

I'm just a regular guy. I go to work everyday (never been on welfare a day in my life), am an honorably discharged veteran, a regular "church goer", and I look all around and see America losing it's identity.

We've got "Presidents day" now (used to be that George Washington and Abe Lincoln each deserved their "own" holiday, now its just "Presidents Day"), Martin Luther King Day, Memorial day, 4th of July, Labor day, Veterans day, and Thanksgiving.

Most people don't even recognize veterans day anymore (most schools are open), and Columbus Day is officially "not recognized" in some states (check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbus_Day).

Don't get me wrong, I'm not the biggest turkey fan in the world, but I think we're so concerned nowadays about everyone elses "heritage" that we're losing the few truely unique things that qualify as "American" in heritage.

Chief
10-27-2006, 06:24 AM
Anyone inject their turkeys? I've done both (deep fried and baked) with marinades. Man what a differance! My personal favorite Cajun deep fried but I use commertal frier oil too.
My wife caught me injecting the turkey once. All I was trying to do is get the stuffing all the way inside...................:D

TMCNo1
10-27-2006, 08:19 AM
My wife caught me injecting the turkey once. All I was trying to do is get the stuffing all the way inside...................:D
:uglyhamme You have been talking to Skigdog!:rolleyes: :D

TMCNo1
10-27-2006, 08:23 AM
Wow am I insulted. That hurt my feelings. :(

Gene complains about silly stuff.

I'm just being patriotic.

I'm kinda tired of hearing how everything traditionally "American" is wrong, or intolerant, or <fill in the blank>.

I'm just a regular guy. I go to work everyday (never been on welfare a day in my life), am an honorably discharged veteran, a regular "church goer", and I look all around and see America losing it's identity.

We've got "Presidents day" now (used to be that George Washington and Abe Lincoln each deserved their "own" holiday, now its just "Presidents Day"), Martin Luther King Day, Memorial day, 4th of July, Labor day, Veterans day, and Thanksgiving.

Most people don't even recognize veterans day anymore (most schools are open), and Columbus Day is officially "not recognized" in some states (check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbus_Day).

Don't get me wrong, I'm not the biggest turkey fan in the world, but I think we're so concerned nowadays about everyone elses "heritage" that we're losing the few truely unique things that qualify as "American" in heritage.


Please don't be offended, it's all in jest, but the Turkey Nazi's will be cruising all the neighborhoods looking and smelling for non-conformists! We can't have anyone eating chitterlings and pigs feet for Thanksgiving!

Danimal
10-27-2006, 08:52 AM
I bet rabbit was served at the first Thanksgiving. There was plenty of wild game served at thanksgiving so I would consider that a "Traditional" dish. Now... If I was to serve Tacos or Lasagne, then we would have issues.:toast:

RexDog1
10-27-2006, 11:18 AM
Well we went through this last year for the Christmas, and it was crazy looking back!

For thanksgiving, you need a turkey!!!!!! But the big hit was the Prime Rib:D

this is what I go by when I deep fry my turkey!!!!!!!

16 ounces of Cajun InjectorŽ Marinade
12-14 pound turkey
Cajun InjectorŽ Cajun Shake seasoning
3-4 Gallons of cooking oil 1. Remove giblets and rinse turkey with warm water. Drain cavity completely.
2. Attach needle to injector by turning clockwise until snug. Do not over-tighten needle.
3. Shake marinade well. Pour needed marinade into separate container and draw into injector.
4. Inject turkey with approximately 4 ounces of marinade into breast. Inject breast at three different points on each side of breast. Insert injector at an angle completely into each breast. Push plunger down slowly while pulling injector slowly out of breast. Apply same injection technique into thigh and drumstick. Inject 2 ounces of marinade into each thigh and drumstick. Use about 16 ounces of marinade per turkey. Use about 12 ounces of marinade for a bone-in turkey breast.
5. Sprinkle outside of turkey and cavity generously with Cajun ShakeŽ (seasoned salt) -- rub in well. Caution: Make sure all water is drained from breast cavity before deep-frying. Heat 3-4 gallons of peanut oil to 350°F.
6. Place whole turkey or turkey breast, breast side down into fry basket. When oil has reached 350°F slowly (very slowly) lower basket into oil. Use of cooking mitts is highly recommended for lowering and raising fry basket out of oil.
7. Deep-fry whole turkey at 3-1/2 minutes per pound and deep fry a bone-in turkey breast at 7-8 minutes per pound at 350°F. A breast takes longer to cook because the whole turkey has a large cavity which when filled with the oil helps the bird cook from the inside as well as the outside. (In a similar manner, if you're going to deep-fry a chicken or a Cornish game hen, the cooking time is 9 minutes per pound.)
8. When desired cooking time has been achieved raise basket out of oil. Allow excess oil to drain from basket. Remove turkey or turkey breast from basket and allow to rest for at least 20 minutes. ENJOY YOUR DELICIOUS FRIED TURKEY.