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lassy
10-25-2006, 09:54 AM
New boat owner here (1999 X star w/LT1)........so bare with me.

I live in central Georgia, and last night was out first night to reach 32, not below...just 32. I opened the two block drains, but i wasn't sure where the manifold drains were. I think they are a 1/2" square socket drain, below the manifolds...but I wasn't sure. Anyways, I removed the dividers next to the engine and left 3 60W lights surrounding the engine, as well as a larger 300W work light in the back compartment too. I shut the cover and hoped that would be sufficient.

Anyways, I was just curious as to if this sounded a bit ridiculous for a 32 night?

Also, did I find the manifold drains or not? Based on the description I gave of what I thought they looked like?

Should I worry about disconnecting hoses at 32?

Any advice would be helpful.

vogelm1
10-25-2006, 10:01 AM
I would be the same way - wouldn't be able to sleep at night knowing something might freeze. But I think you were safe, especially if you put a trouble light or other type of light bulb in the engine compartment. I personally wouldn't push it much into the 20's though...it only takes 5 minutes to drain everything, so why risk an expensive engine right? Sounds like you found the manifold drain OK.

lassy
10-25-2006, 10:04 AM
well, i didn't open the manifold drain because i wasn't sure that that was the even the drain.

is the manifold the 3/8" square socket bolt?

vogelm1
10-25-2006, 10:04 AM
Do you still have the owner's manual? I know mine has some fairly good photos of where all the drains are. If you need a manual you can do a search on here, or visit Mastercraft.com - there are links to owner's manuals for many years. Good luck !

peason
10-25-2006, 10:04 AM
You should be fine with the lights - probably over kill. If you have an owners manual it should show where the drains are, otherwise look up the Indmar web site and find the manual for your engine. I have a 310 HP chevy engine - I have two drains - on either side of the engine - on the passenger side it has a brass nut - the drivers side has a anti knock sensor. Once you locate these - open them up and stick a screw driver in them to dislodge any corrosion to make sure they drain. You will also want to open up your exhaust manifolds and drain them too. See the winterization checklist in the Frequently asked question forum, and it will give you more help to make sure your protected.

ntidsl
10-25-2006, 10:14 AM
you sound as bad as me as far as worrying...better safe than sorry...I winterize my brother in laws boat because he waits so long. That being said...water isnt going to freeze unless its way below 32 for a good amount of time. The MC dealer here in Cincinnati has over 300 boats waiting to be winterized in their lot. I had a beer with the mechanic last night, he didnt seem too worried but it was supposed to be 28 last night. I drain my lines and block and manifold everytime I pul the boat out this time of year...then tow it back to the garage and put it in a heated garage. why do I drain it? because I'm a worry wort!!!

vogelm1
10-25-2006, 10:20 AM
well, i didn't open the manifold drain because i wasn't sure that that was the even the drain.

is the manifold the 3/8" square socket bolt?

I would guess that's it...on my '05 it's a hex head near the low side of the head.

flya750
10-25-2006, 10:21 AM
32..no worries...

erkoehler
10-25-2006, 10:22 AM
32 is going to take a few days to crach a block...you'll be fine :) If it gets down to mid/low 20s for 48 hours or more I'd be worried.

NeilM
10-25-2006, 10:26 AM
Let me try to answer most of your questions:
1) Is draining at 32 degrees as an overnight low overkill? Yes - it has to drop below freezing for a long time for water to freeze inside the hoses / block (but the heater core will freeze fast). But is it worth losing sleep over? nope. I drain everything when it gets close.
2) Is 420 watts of light in the compartment at 32 degrees overkill? Yes. A 100w bulb provides a lot of protection.
3) Did you find the manifold drains from the description you gave? Can't tell. Can you post a pic?

You can also download the online manuals - link from this site. That should help you figure out where the drains are.

Short answer: The lights alone were more than enough to keep you safe at 32 degrees..
But depending on the weatherman is always risky. If there's a risk of frost, drain everything and you're safe.

lassy
10-25-2006, 10:41 AM
Thanks guys!

I have checked the Indmar manual and the mastercraft manual and neither give a description of where the manifold drains are, or what they look like.

I'll post a picture later if i make it out to the marina.

Good to know about the temperature needing to be in the twenties to do anything. I figured that I would be ok, but I just wanted to check with some more knowledgable folks like yall.

east tx skier
10-25-2006, 11:29 AM
Even outside, I don't think 32 degrees for one night will crack a block. ICBW. I'd have drained it, too, just because. The transmission cooler and pump housing, etc. may be a different story. Enclosed storage will not get to 32 degrees necessarily just because it's 32 outside. Not sure what your storage situation is though.

Just in case, here are your drain locations. This is a picture of a Ford, but the drain locations are nearly identical.

P.S. Pull the kill switch and spin your engine over for 5 seconds (with hoses detached from pump) to get the water out of the pump housing. Suffice it to say, it's not as beefy as the block.

beef
10-25-2006, 11:51 AM
It's possible that your manifold drains are connected together behind the engine with a quick-disconnect hose (as in the above illustration). To drain them you can just unscrew the connection where the two hoses meet.

agua4fun
10-25-2006, 06:43 PM
My boat is floating in the water right now - same question, how cold would it have to get to worry about freezing. I am guessing that the 45degree water it is floating in, will heat up the boat enough to not allow it to freeze untill the air temp is in the 20s or less. what do you think?

erkoehler
10-25-2006, 06:52 PM
My boat is floating in the water right now - same question, how cold would it have to get to worry about freezing. I am guessing that the 45degree water it is floating in, will heat up the boat enough to not allow it to freeze untill the air temp is in the 20s or less. what do you think?


In the water, you should be ok....BUT, I AM NOT LIABLE!

j2nh
10-25-2006, 07:46 PM
BE CAREFUL WITH LIGHTBULBS!
Had a buddy melt the carpet with a trouble light while trying to "protect" his 190. A 40 watt not touching anything in the motorbox is more than enough to keep water from freezing when the temp dips to 30 or so. Better yet get a magnetic oil pan heater and forget the lightbulb.

east tx skier
10-26-2006, 10:27 AM
My boat is floating in the water right now - same question, how cold would it have to get to worry about freezing. I am guessing that the 45degree water it is floating in, will heat up the boat enough to not allow it to freeze untill the air temp is in the 20s or less. what do you think?

You may be right. If you're wrong, the upside is that you could get into Water Ski Magazine.

agua4fun
10-26-2006, 07:50 PM
yup, that would be bad!
I hope to get it out after one last ski ride this weekend.
Actually there is enough current here, that even when the water is freezing, it rarely turns to ice

lassy
10-27-2006, 07:51 AM
I had an idea:

It seems like if you draped a heating blanket over your entire engine...and around the sides, that it would keep everything nice and warm. Sound crazy?

PeteS
10-27-2006, 08:47 AM
As a disclaimer, my notes below are only items that I've "heard" over the years and not proven or factual. I cannot be held responsible for damages.

That being said, one of my ski buddies floats his SKI 190 and leaves it in the water until Thanksgiving regardless of the air or water temperatures, and has never drained the blocks.

He's had to walk across 10' or so of ice around the shore to get out to the boat many of times, and has never had an issue. In fact, once overnight it got very cold and the lake froze over completely -- he guessed maybe an 1/4" of ice. The boat started right up and he crawled to the launch. None of these practices I endorse, in fact he scares the heck out of me with that boat.

In the water, based on his experiences, you'll insulate the engine to a point where as long as the lake isn't frozen, you're block won't be either.

In addition, at some point a dealer told me that the threshhold out of the water is something like 27 degrees, for 4+ hours before freezing becomes a concern.

Hope that helps.