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LakePirate
10-11-2006, 03:09 PM
Ok here is the question

Off the top of your head give me the answers

The port that each of the following protocols travel through?

https
telnet
snmp


What character in a cisco command line indicates that you are in enable mode?

In a poorly asked question, name the circuit packs in an Avaya G650 and how they interact with and Avaya S8710

What port setting allows traffic to flow both ways? (the simplicity can throw you off)

If you had several branches and only wanted to have one circuit to each one how would you set it up so that there is a meshed network?
(oh yeah, no data center)

No lie got asked these and other out there questions on a phone interview 30 minutes ago. Talk about random. Steam is literally coming out of my ears on this. The dam recruiter could have given me a heads up on this.


Sorry had to vent somewhere and you are the lucky recipients.

P-Rod
10-11-2006, 03:32 PM
I failed your quiz!! This is all a foreign language to me. I think I will stick to building buildings for a living.

bcampbe7
10-11-2006, 03:34 PM
Ok here is the question

Off the top of your head give me the answers

The port that each of the following protocols travel through?

https
telnet
snmp


What character in a cisco command line indicates that you are in enable mode?

In a poorly asked question, name the circuit packs in an Avaya G650 and how they interact with and Avaya S8710

What port setting allows traffic to flow both ways? (the simplicity can throw you off)

If you had several branches and only wanted to have one circuit to each one how would you set it up so that there is a meshed network?
(oh yeah, no data center)

No lie got asked these and other out there questions on a phone interview 30 minutes ago. Talk about random. Steam is literally coming out of my ears on this. The dam recruiter could have given me a heads up on this.


Sorry had to vent somewhere and you are the lucky recipients.


443

23

161

#

Don't know anything about Avaya...

full-duplex

Not really a meshed network if you only have one circuit to each branch. What if that single circuit was taken out by Joe digging with his back-hoe?


That sucks man... I doubt I got any of them correct, but it would be even harder when put on the spot in a phone interview.
I had the same thing happen to me in a face-to-face interview. I knew the answers but I went blank and looked like a complete idiot.

LakePirate
10-11-2006, 03:47 PM
Good call on the ports. I only knew that 23 was telnet. Did you know them off the top of your head?

And my favorite was how much bandwidth is in a data t1

- um, what do you mean by T1? DS0, DS1 24 channels of DS1. Do you want to get into CIR how frequently are you willing to let it burst, and how long. What type of traffic?

Oh 1536K.

I am really pissed at the recruiter for not giving me a heads up. I looked at the job description and went and brushed up on my windowsNT and WINS knowledge.

If I had known that this was an aptitude test I would have been prepared. I could have pulled an Avaya config up and read off what is there. Grrrrr..

bcampbe7
10-11-2006, 03:55 PM
Good call on the ports. I only knew that 23 was telnet. Did you know them off the top of your head?

And my favorite was how much bandwidth is in a data t1

- um, what do you mean by T1? DS0, DS1 24 channels of DS1. Do you want to get into CIR how frequently are you willing to let it burst, and how long. What type of traffic?

Oh 1536K.

I am really pissed at the recruiter for not giving me a heads up. I looked at the job description and went and brushed up on my windowsNT and WINS knowledge.

If I had known that this was an aptitude test I would have been prepared. I could have pulled an Avaya config up and read off what is there. Grrrrr..


Yeah, but I deal with them frequently...

It almost sounds like the person asking the questions did not know what they was asking. They were a little too vague IMHO.

I would be interested to hear where they were going with the single circuit meshed question. Do they use wave division multiplexing or something?

LakePirate
10-11-2006, 03:57 PM
Yeah, but I deal with them frequently...

It almost sounds like the person asking the questions did not know what they was asking. They were a little too vague IMHO.


I thought so as well.

You should see the job description.


I should have known better, it was for a software company. They are used to people writing code all day.

JimN
10-11-2006, 04:26 PM
Couldn't a meshed network be set up with each client connected through a hub or router, with the mesh connecting the routers? That way, it would be easier to add clients later. The idjit on the back-hoe is one of the main reasons for a true mesh network as long as there are multiple entry/exit points on the building. Was it a parallel mesh or single mesh?

I thought Cisco used 1 for enable.

Broadband doesn't work in full duplex mode. A 10/100BaseTX would, though.

Not that I'm an expert with networking but I am in the middle of a Network + course.

The person may have been trying to see if you recognize questions that cover things that aren't real or can't happen, too. I had a mid-term last week and realized that I studied for one test and she gave us a different one. Not all of it but some parts.

Lake- go to www.ieee.org/web/web/search/index.html. They have a ton of info (probably more than you or anyone else needs, unless they're an EE).

Re: T1 bandwidth, I found this, too. "Why is the throughput for a T1 line often listed at 1.544 Mbps? A T1 always has a bandwidth of 1.544 Mbps, but 8 Kbps of that bandwidth is never available. It is lost to housekeeping tasks, such as tracking which packets belong to which channel. Therefore, the effective usable bandwidth of a T1 circuit is 1.536 Mbps."

Monte
10-11-2006, 04:31 PM
This thread is making me go BLIND!!!!!!!!!!! Lake I feel for ya!! Oh yeah...... I failed the quiz too!!

slink976
10-11-2006, 04:38 PM
https 443
telnet 23
snmp 161

# enable mode

Need more info to answer this "Avaya G650 and how they interact with and Avaya S8710"

If you had several branches and only wanted to have one circuit to each one how would you set it up so that there is a meshed network?
meshed network = N-1(*N)

slink976
10-11-2006, 04:40 PM
And my favorite was how much bandwidth is in a data t1

1.544 Mbs

slink976
10-11-2006, 04:41 PM
sorry N-1(n) divided by 2

slink976
10-11-2006, 04:44 PM
Lake,
I am currently hiring 3 network engineers, if you are interested Pm me and I tell you the job descriptions and what I am really looking for.

Lee

LakePirate
10-11-2006, 04:49 PM
Very good work there Jim.

The last time I took any sort of class was 3 years ago and it was a Server 2k3, Active Directory and Exchange classes.

I took Cisco Bootcamp about 6 years ago.

To enable a cisco router you simply type
Router>enable
Router#


You have been paying attention in class.

The real point I was trying to make with a meshed network is that without more details I couldn't provide an answer. A meshed network is basically a sonnet ring, but that cannot be achieved with only one circuit going to the branch. Meshed is such a Buzzword that it could have a hundred meanings. Think Daisy Chained workstations, they have 2 lines 1 in and 1 out.

What you are talking about Jim is redundancy. But the only way to get complete redundancy in circuits is to use 2 Central Offices and the real kicker is 2 different "last mile" pipes. That way when Joe Backhoe cuts one, he won't cut both.

Just got word from the recruiter that I did fine on the network part but didn't know enough Avaya. Um....That is pretty much all I have worked on the past year.


The 25th trunk on a T1 is the one you are referring. And yes it is bandwidth you are paying for but not using.

Doug G
10-11-2006, 05:06 PM
Ok here is the question

Off the top of your head give me the answers

The port that each of the following protocols travel through?

https - 443
telnet - 23
snmp - trap or query tcp or udp ? 161, 162


What character in a cisco command line indicates that you are in enable mode? #

In a poorly asked question, name the circuit packs in an Avaya G650 and how they interact with and Avaya S8710 - "need to replace me packs" buy Cisco Unified Comms. ;)

What port setting allows traffic to flow both ways? (the simplicity can throw you off) ummm .. how bout on :) ... switch port? router port? voice port ? Bad question but they are probably looking for full duplex in a LAN environment.

If you had several branches and only wanted to have one circuit to each one how would you set it up so that there is a meshed network?
(oh yeah, no data center) Old school answer Frame Relay.... new school :cool: $$$

No lie got asked these and other out there questions on a phone interview 30 minutes ago. Talk about random. Steam is literally coming out of my ears on this. The dam recruiter could have given me a heads up on this.

Switch recruiters ... and if the questions where that bad you probably didn't want to be there anyway

Sorry had to vent somewhere and you are the lucky recipients.
----------

Doug G
10-11-2006, 05:13 PM
Couldn't a meshed network be set up with each client connected through a hub or router, with the mesh connecting the routers? That way, it would be easier to add clients later. The idjit on the back-hoe is one of the main reasons for a true mesh network as long as there are multiple entry/exit points on the building. Was it a parallel mesh or single mesh?

I thought Cisco used 1 for enable.

Broadband doesn't work in full duplex mode. A 10/100BaseTX would, though.

Not that I'm an expert with networking but I am in the middle of a Network + course.

The person may have been trying to see if you recognize questions that cover things that aren't real or can't happen, too. I had a mid-term last week and realized that I studied for one test and she gave us a different one. Not all of it but some parts.

Lake- go to www.ieee.org/web/web/search/index.html. They have a ton of info (probably more than you or anyone else needs, unless they're an EE).

Re: T1 bandwidth, I found this, too. "Why is the throughput for a T1 line often listed at 1.544 Mbps? A T1 always has a bandwidth of 1.544 Mbps, but 8 Kbps of that bandwidth is never available. It is lost to housekeeping tasks, such as tracking which packets belong to which channel. Therefore, the effective usable bandwidth of a T1 circuit is 1.536 Mbps."

That actually depends on the protocol and encapsulation. I.E. F/R vs. clear T1 etc...

Doug G
10-11-2006, 05:25 PM
Very good work there Jim.

The last time I took any sort of class was 3 years ago and it was a Server 2k3, Active Directory and Exchange classes.

I took Cisco Bootcamp about 6 years ago.

To enable a cisco router you simply type
Router>enable
Router#


You have been paying attention in class.

The real point I was trying to make with a meshed network is that without more details I couldn't provide an answer. A meshed network is basically a sonnet ring, but that cannot be achieved with only one circuit going to the branch. Meshed is such a Buzzword that it could have a hundred meanings. Think Daisy Chained workstations, they have 2 lines 1 in and 1 out.

What you are talking about Jim is redundancy. But the only way to get complete redundancy in circuits is to use 2 Central Offices and the real kicker is 2 different "last mile" pipes. That way when Joe Backhoe cuts one, he won't cut both.

Just got word from the recruiter that I did fine on the network part but didn't know enough Avaya. Um....That is pretty much all I have worked on the past year.


The 25th trunk on a T1 is the one you are referring. And yes it is bandwidth you are paying for but not using.

There are only 24 DS0's on a T1 each DSO has 64k Therefore the 1.536. The 8k is on the FDL but not a DSO, you couldn't use it if you wanted to. (assuming ESF on the T1) If you use the T1 for a PRI then you only use 23 of the 24 and the 24th is the signalling and control.

High availability / redundancy is not really an issue of eliminating failure points because there will always be a single point of failure somewhere. It is actually an exercise of moving your failure points to a place of acceptable risk and having good remediation plans to minimize the impact if it happens. My:twocents: FWIW.

LakePirate
10-11-2006, 05:41 PM
Damn we have a Carrier convention going on in here.

To clarify my comment earlier (I know what a T1 is and how many channels/trunks for voice and data, as well as DS0 and DS1) when someone says that they have a T1, what does that mean to them. Lots of people think that they have a T1 but they really only have a DS0 or a DS1.

Sure there is always a single point of failure somewhere, but if you can order your circuit properly with a competent account manager, and it is provisioned correctly you can eliminate multiple single points of failure.

Doug G
10-11-2006, 05:51 PM
Agreed. The comments were more for the others studying ... It's all good, nothing personal ...

BTW... I am a network dude... not a carrier dude. ( I run a 24 hr NOC remediating carrier stuff , along with a team of guys designing and implementing networks) Without a doubt the #1 challenge, after the customer, that is an issue is the carrier.They rank among my least favorite organizations to deal with. If you are a carrier dude. nothing personal, my condolences and good luck getting out

LakePirate
10-11-2006, 05:54 PM
Agreed. The comments were more for the others studying ... It's all good, nothing personal ...

BTW... I am a network dude... not a carrier dude. ( I run a 24 hr NOC remediating carrier stuff , along with a team of guys designing and implementing networks) Without a doubt the #1 challenge, after the customer, that is an issue is the carrier.They rank among my least favorite organizations to deal with. If you are a carrier dude. nothing personal, my condolences and good luck getting out


Oh no I am a former NOC dude. Sometimes known as a data dork. Who do you use? We had MCI and BellSouth. The trick I found was to find someone in Cary, NC (MCI) and be real nice to them and things will get done and updates will be given.

Who do you provide service/work for?

stevo137
10-11-2006, 05:56 PM
OK, now please tell me the best way to wipe my laptop before turning it in. :rolleyes: They sent me a new one and want the old one back.

Doug G
10-11-2006, 06:00 PM
OK, now please tell me the best way to wipe my laptop before turning it in. :rolleyes: They sent me a new one and want the old one back.

How much of a wipe? Like a doorstop or just your personal stuff?

slink976
10-11-2006, 06:00 PM
OK, now please tell me the best way to wipe my laptop before turning it in. :rolleyes: They sent me a new one and want the old one back.

We are network peeps not laptop tech's lol

Doug G
10-11-2006, 06:01 PM
Oh no I am a former NOC dude. Sometimes known as a data dork. Who do you use? We had MCI and BellSouth. The trick I found was to find someone in Cary, NC (MCI) and be real nice to them and things will get done and updates will be given.

Who do you provide service/work for?

We have hundreds of customers at various levels of service entitlements with carrier accounts that cover all of the major carriers and some smaller ILEC's. They all blow ...

LakePirate
10-11-2006, 06:12 PM
OK, now please tell me the best way to wipe my laptop before turning it in. :rolleyes: They sent me a new one and want the old one back.


Really big magnet.

LakePirate
10-11-2006, 06:13 PM
We have hundreds of customers at various levels of service entitlements with carrier accounts that cover all of the major carriers and some smaller ILEC's. They all blow ...


Very Cool

Frontier is the worst.

stevo137
10-11-2006, 07:16 PM
How much of a wipe? Like a doorstop or just your personal stuff?
Clean slate....

JimN
10-11-2006, 07:42 PM
Wouldn't removing the OS take care of it? I thought installing an OS without partitioning would make the old data unreadable/unuseable. Doesn't reformatting a drive also kill everything?

I'm not a programming guy, either. Hell, I'm not even a network guy. Certainly not a Data Dork. Maybe a Boat Bozo.

H20skeefreek
10-11-2006, 07:43 PM
anyone wanna play chess?

get your a$$ outside and ski or something.

LakePirate
10-11-2006, 10:33 PM
Wouldn't removing the OS take care of it? I thought installing an OS without partitioning would make the old data unreadable/unuseable. Doesn't reformatting a drive also kill everything?

I'm not a programming guy, either. Hell, I'm not even a network guy. Certainly not a Data Dork. Maybe a Boat Bozo.


StevO if you have the software to reload the OS you can get most of it off of there. Just make sure like Jim says repartition the drive. It would be best to repartion it to something crazy like in half, then partion it again properly. Kinda jumbles everything up good.

If you need me to I can walk you through it.

PendO
10-11-2006, 11:18 PM
If you want to do it for free go to google and search "autoclave hard drive" or you can buy software like "wipedrive" and it will essentially reformat the drive to various degrees "never to be found again" ... a few years ago I accidently forgot to back up a years worth of biz taxes/acct. info ... then I reformatted and used the newly formatted computer for a few months and ... then I realized my mistake ... I search the internet for some data recovery software (paid a pretty good chunk of dough) and was able to retrive the file from my hard drive that contained a backup of that particular year ... the information was still there as it had not been written over yet ... formatting essentially just makes space, but until everything is written over (ones and zeros) it is still in a "recycle bin" (essentially) that you can retrieve data from (if you have the correct software ... good software will reformat and then write data to every part of the hard drive multiple times, then erase ... so, your old crap/email/personal stuff, will essentially be buied under 25+ layers of ones and zeros ... second only to tearing apart the drive and cutting it up with a cutting torch:)

If you don't have access to the orinal OS who cares, wipe it and turn it in blank ...

JEREMY79
10-11-2006, 11:20 PM
F R E E B I R D

Upper Michigan Prostar190
10-12-2006, 09:29 AM
F R E E B I R D
I'm witchoo Jeremy!:toast: FREEBIRD!!!!
This computer stuff is all greek to me!

COMPUTER NERDS!!!8p

http://www.suzannemcdonough.com/Images/070805/carradine_robert.jpg

LakePirate
10-12-2006, 10:08 AM
I'm witchoo Jeremy!:toast: FREEBIRD!!!!
This computer stuff is all greek to me!

COMPUTER NERDS!!!8p

http://www.suzannemcdonough.com/Images/070805/carradine_robert.jpg


If you remember the last Nerds movie, I believe that our hero wound up with the hottie, oh wait, he had the hottie in the first one.

jimmer2880
10-16-2006, 06:20 AM
If you want to do it for free go to google and search "autoclave hard drive" or you can buy software like "wipedrive" and it will essentially reformat the drive to various degrees "never to be found again" ... a few years ago I accidently forgot to back up a years worth of biz taxes/acct. info ... then I reformatted and used the newly formatted computer for a few months and ... then I realized my mistake ... I search the internet for some data recovery software (paid a pretty good chunk of dough) and was able to retrive the file from my hard drive that contained a backup of that particular year ... the information was still there as it had not been written over yet ... formatting essentially just makes space, but until everything is written over (ones and zeros) it is still in a "recycle bin" (essentially) that you can retrieve data from (if you have the correct software ... good software will reformat and then write data to every part of the hard drive multiple times, then erase ... so, your old crap/email/personal stuff, will essentially be buied under 25+ layers of ones and zeros ... second only to tearing apart the drive and cutting it up with a cutting torch:)

If you don't have access to the orinal OS who cares, wipe it and turn it in blank ...

I second that. You'd be surprised how many times the disk needs to be over-written - sector by sector before all the info is gone. Some of the highter level wipers will over-write 256 times. The killer is, that your file isn't on just 1 part of the physical drive, but could be on parts of other physical sectors. So, in order to get all of it gone, it all parts need to be wiped.

Now - to do what you are trying to do (clean up your p0rn before turning it back in :) ) - just re-format. I doubt your company's techies have enough time to look harder than that anyway.

Leroy
10-16-2006, 07:20 AM
I'm lost! Good thing I did not have to answer those questions!

dmayer84
10-16-2006, 09:09 AM
As Im reading all of this Im here studying for my CCNA with my MCSE stuck working at a help desk.

Upper Michigan Prostar190
10-16-2006, 09:18 AM
If you remember the last Nerds movie, I believe that our hero wound up with the hottie, oh wait, he had the hottie in the first one.
I think he got the hottie in BOTH movies.....:o

JimN
10-16-2006, 10:05 AM
Data is almost always fragmented when it goes onto a disc and this is one reason it's hard to overwrite. If 'defragmentation' is performed on a regular basis (can be set up in the Task Manager), it's more likely that it'll be A) easier to access and B) easier to overwrite.

Worst case, buy another hard drive and keep the one with questionable data. They're cheap enough now.

Tryin-again
10-16-2006, 10:09 AM
I assume your talking PC - But if it was a Mac - the newer system disc has the tools to "over-write existing data" 8 times - It takes a little time but might be worth it - :D

dmayer84
10-16-2006, 10:15 AM
A sledge to the drive is always a good way of destrying data, especially when the disc controller fails.

jimmer2880
10-17-2006, 06:02 AM
A sledge to the drive is always a good way of destrying data, especially when the disc controller fails.

Unless, of course, someone really really wanted what was on the disk. Then, the only good way of making it un-read'able, is to burn it. Amazing what an incinerator will handle.