PDA

View Full Version : Change oil before the season or after?


blk83mc
10-10-2006, 04:05 PM
Do you guys change the oil at the beginning or the end of the season and why? I change mine every 50 hours, but the last few years I haven't been putting 50 hours on it. Do you let the old oil stay in the block all winter or the new oil? What weight oil do you use? Thanks Keith

thijs
10-10-2006, 04:14 PM
Keith,

I think most people will agree that you should have an oil change at the end of the season. Not sure why, but it seems what most people do. We run 15w40 on our PS205. It is the same engine block as a normal chev 350, but the marine engines tend to run much harder and sustain high RPMs longer than an engine in a car. Hope this helps, also if you search the forums for key words within your question you will find that most questions have been asked and answered time and time again.

east tx skier
10-10-2006, 04:15 PM
I do mine in the Fall when I winterize.

prostar205
10-10-2006, 04:23 PM
I know alot of people say they change the oil at the end of each season, but I change it in the spring - especially if I am not at the next 50 hour interval by the end of the season. For instance, I started the season this year with 165 hours on the clock, I changed the oil at 200 (my next oil change interval) and now I have 235 hours on her. I will wait until the spring to change again unless I reach the 250 hour mark during the winter. My boat sits on a lift in a covered marina during the winter. I do winterize the boat but have been known to re-commission her during the winter and go for a pull or two.

My L-18 uses staright 40W Marine Grade Penzoil.

jbfootin
10-10-2006, 04:33 PM
I do the spring. Instead of putting new oil in and leaving it sit for 4-5 months. I leave the old in and after the first time (or 2 if I'm lazy) out I change it with the engine still warm. This way I have new oil in at the start of the season. The old is not hurting anything with the boat just sitting in the garage.

beef
10-10-2006, 04:42 PM
I change at the end of the season during winterization. I have heard that the best thing to do is remove the used oil along with any contaminants and moisture that have accumulated, instead of letting it sit in the engine all winter. Plus, one less thing to do in the spring when you're ready to go!

Tom023
10-10-2006, 04:48 PM
End of the season for me. I like to get everything insided coated with clean oil before it sits for a couple of months.

bigmac
10-10-2006, 05:18 PM
End of season for me...my rationale is that I don't want any moisture or corrosive byproducts sitting in my engine all winter. There's always water in oil, from condensation if nothing else.

etakk7
10-10-2006, 05:20 PM
another reason people may do it in the fall is if (god forbid) you have water in the oil which could seperate from the oil over time and freeze?

My father-in-law just pulled the plug on the lower unit drive oil on his I/O as part of winterization procedures and the first couple of seconds of draining was water, which could have been a major problem as his boat is left outside in Northern Wisconsin.

BIGBADBLUE
10-10-2006, 05:41 PM
I do mine during winterization to get the contaminates out and then after about 5 hours in the spring. I do this when I change my plugs after the first time out.

bdecker
10-10-2006, 05:44 PM
I've always done it in the fall as well, and then typically again after the boat starts getting some regular use in the spring. I'm probably wasting $15-20, but I've always heard that it should be changed every three months anyway.

I've never noticed any water in the oil (I would think this would a reason to be alarmed...), but if it occurs is it necessary to have the oil change done with winterization (ie- motor not run again until spring)? I've always changed it and then brought it to the dealer to winterize.

Bert
10-10-2006, 07:25 PM
End of season for me...my rationale is that I don't want any moisture or corrosive byproducts sitting in my engine all winter. There's always water in oil, from condensation if nothing else.
That's the correct thing to do.

JimN
10-10-2006, 08:26 PM
Old oil is acidic and contaminated. If highly acidic oil is left on machined surfaces, it begins to corrode and pit the metal. It's not as bad if it happens to non-machined surfaces but you don't want bearing or machined surfaces going bad. Also, from personal experience with a customer's motor, if a motor sits for too long, parts like cam and distributor gears can break down to the point that the teeth crumble where they're in contact for too long.

prostar205
10-10-2006, 08:29 PM
So, the general consensus seems to be to change it in the fall during winterization and again in the spring when you start using the boat on a regular basis?

thijs
10-10-2006, 08:34 PM
Seems to be a easy and relatively way to avoid a REALLY big and expensive situation later on.

Tom023
10-10-2006, 09:02 PM
So, the general consensus seems to be to change it in the fall during winterization and again in the spring when you start using the boat on a regular basis?

I don't change it a second time in the spring before using it. I haven't heard of that, what is the logic behind doing so?

Leroy
10-10-2006, 09:34 PM
End of season only, regardless of hours, but I tend to be 40-55 hours every year.

pilot02
10-10-2006, 09:39 PM
Fall and Spring!
My boat only lays up For Dec and Jan though.

Footin
10-10-2006, 09:55 PM
I change the Mobil1 in the fall.

roddydog
10-10-2006, 10:19 PM
Old oil is acidic and contaminated.



What JimN sed!!!!!

Unless you only have a few hours on your oil and you just changed it, don't worry.

If you only have a few hours on your oil but you changed it in the spring?

CHANGE IT !!!

It's only a few bucks and it can save hunny's down the road.:twocents:

erkoehler
10-10-2006, 11:33 PM
Change it in the fall....then you can hook up the battery and go in the spring!

H20skeefreek
10-11-2006, 08:57 AM
Both......