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View Full Version : Hints for pulling out boat lift?


3event
09-30-2006, 11:55 PM
We have a ShoreStation lift, and it use to be no big deal to assemble a good gang for cleanup day - when you have 7-8 guys you don't have to be too creative in lifting. It's getting harder to schedule fall weekend afternoons so we are trying to figure out ways to lift smart and not depend on a big crew.

We have to drag the thing about 30' in to the shoreline, then over the rip rock onto the front lawn. We have considered using the truck for the pull, but most years it's too wet and we risk leaving ruts in the lawn.

Looking for any methods used to make the job easier - any suggestions would be welcome !!

phecksel
10-01-2006, 12:01 AM
Long piece of pipe welded to two old wheels and tires, and rolled on to long 2x10. Two people should be able to do it.

Another suggestion, use pipes (4) perpindicular to shore, tie a come a long to a tree or something solid and winch it in.

Am a bit surprised it takes 7-8 people, we've lifted them out with just 4. Are there several neighbors that maybe need to do the same thing?

nuckinfutz
10-01-2006, 12:02 AM
any pics to see what were up against?

bigmac
10-01-2006, 12:10 AM
We have a ShoreStation lift, and it use to be no big deal to assemble a good gang for cleanup day - when you have 7-8 guys you don't have to be too creative in lifting. It's getting harder to schedule fall weekend afternoons so we are trying to figure out ways to lift smart and not depend on a big crew.

We have to drag the thing about 30' in to the shoreline, then over the rip rock onto the front lawn. We have considered using the truck for the pull, but most years it's too wet and we risk leaving ruts in the lawn.

Looking for any methods used to make the job easier - any suggestions would be welcome !!

The way I used to do it was jack the lift up, slip on the wheels, attach a cable bridle to each vertical post and a long, long cable to my truck and pull the lift in using 2x12 planks to get it over the shoreline. It was a one-man job Now I just pay someone to do it.

If you can't get enough guys to carry it in, and if you don't want to pay someone to do it, and you can't get a truck down to the shoreline, it seems to me you're pretty much screwed.

Only thing I can think of is a wheel kit and a come-along or some other kind of winch if you can find someplace to anchor it.

RickDV
10-01-2006, 12:12 AM
To get the lift to the shoreline use 2 tubes, one in the middle in the front and the other in the middle in the back. Should be able to float easily to the shore.

3event
10-01-2006, 12:12 AM
That was quick, thanks guys.... heres a pic....

Hoosier Bob
10-01-2006, 12:14 AM
I thought, "finally a thread I can relate to!" Sorry guys I was way off!:o

bigmac
10-01-2006, 12:36 AM
That was quick, thanks guys.... heres a pic....

Nice setup. Looks like a classic candidate for the BigMac technique. Those wheel kits sure to make it simple to winch those things out. Those tire ruts in the lawn even out by spring :D .

mess33
10-01-2006, 12:43 AM
Invest in a set of wheels and brackets. We use a winch on the front of a pickup. My neighbor has a guy that does it by himself with a chainsaw. Stihl makes an attachement meant for skidding logs. You hook the saw to firm anchor like a tree and the saw does all the work. My neighbor does not even put wheels on but I do not recommend just dragging it in as he does. Especially an aluminum lift.

Mess

Blair
10-01-2006, 03:32 AM
this is what we did to ours....


http://img293.imageshack.us/img293/5900/may24004sc4.jpg

4 tires on 2 axles bolted to the feet of the lift, we can push it in by hand, and to pull it out we just need a little pull with the quad to get it out of the holes it sinks into

cost us about $50 in scrap metal to build the axles

88 PS190
10-01-2006, 06:01 AM
i agree on wheels, for pulling it out, there are a few good methods, one i like was posted by floe lifts i believe, they have a pulley attached to a steel post. then a hole in the ground has a reciever in it so you slip the post into it (could be covered up w/ dirt or a paver most of the year then a cable/rope runs from your boat through the reciever and then to the lift, so you pull the lift up, drive away to your trailer and kill two birds w/ one stone.

we have an old school 1940's farmall cub tractor that makes pretty short work of pulling a lift up, wheels or not, but make sure you collapse the legs so they get less strain.

Other thoughts, if you need to go over big rocks get some boards to use as ramps, if you need to pull w/ a cable make a V to pull on, don't attach to the middle of a bar or you'll wreck your lift *aluminum*
and if your lift wheel has a hole in it for draining water tie th e wheel w/ the drain hole to the bottom or it will fill w/ condensation and moisture and crack when it freezes, then the first time you get it moving too fast and try to stop it you will get cut (experience)

bigmac
10-01-2006, 08:51 AM
Shore Station makes a wheel kit for their lifts. It uses actual trailer hubs and road-worthy tires, with a bracket and trailer hitch at the front. It's designed to be able to pull the thing out and haul it on the road. It's very slick, but expensive. I had one of these on my previous lift, a steel Shore Station.

http://www.shorestation.com/images/l_h_b_access_ssaa.jpg

For short hauls, like out of the lake and across the lawn, a cheaper choice is a plastic wheel and simple steel spindles with brackets that bolt on. I have this setup on my current aluminum lift. Look HERE (http://dhdocks.com/shop.cfm?groupid=Boat%20Lift%20Accessories&catid=Wheel%20Kits%20and%20Parts)...

http://dhdocks.com/products/thmb_984%2Ejpg

Some plastic-coated cable from the hardware store to form a V-bridle at the front then a single cable back to a truck, winch, 4-wheeler, tractor etc with some 2x12 planks and the thing comes right out. As I said, I used to do it by myself, but of course it's easier with one other person to help guide the lift.

The wheels are easy to put on even in the deep water by jacking the thing up high enough to slip the wheels on. I (my dock guy) use a lift jack to do that. It really simplifies getting the wheels on and off, and adjusting the legs on install and retracting them for removal.

http://www.pierpleasure.com/images/Accessories/Lift_Jack_1.jpghttp://www.pierpleasure.com/images/Accessories/Lift_Jack_2.jpg

I've spent 25 years living on a lake trying to find the simplest way to get docks and lifts in and out. I've tried many, many different systems. Especially after my kids and their buddies went away to college, I have come to the distinct conclusion that by far the easiest way is to pay a guy to do it.

mess33
10-01-2006, 12:05 PM
I use the wheel kit and winch shown in Big Macs photos. Pier Pleasure shows them as acc. on their web site. One set of wheels right in the middle works fine. A 4 wheeler would do fine job of pulling it out also. Hiring someone is good also. Buy the time you buy beer for 7 or 8 guys feed them etc. You could hire a guy.

Mess

3event
10-01-2006, 09:00 PM
Thanks for all the ideas and pointers, pictures and links. Now I have some ideas, I like the bolt on wheel kits. We pulled it today.....sans wheels, we hooked up to the truck and dragged the thing, worked OK. Wheels would have been helpful , and they would be even more useful for putting the thing IN the water. That jack assembly looks like another nice trick.....

BigMac, you're right about the simplest solution - backup plan was to call the guys used by some neighbors.

Mag_Red
10-01-2006, 10:48 PM
Bolt some old ski to the botton pads. Should make it easier to drag:twocents:

barefoot
10-02-2006, 12:39 PM
We just pulled ours out this weekend...we had the benefit of having a tree close by that we rigged a pully system to. Tied one end of a rope to the shore station and the other to the ski pylon of the boat. We then used the boat to pull it right up the shore.

Workin' 4 Toys
10-02-2006, 01:17 PM
All these options look like really good reasons to have a Quad around.

bigmac
10-02-2006, 01:20 PM
All these options look like really good reasons to have a Quad around.

Shoot, an anchored post with a winch of any kind would be a heckuva lot cheaper. For me, a pickup truck works better than a quad would.

VTJC
10-02-2006, 02:25 PM
We use a boat http://www.jamiecarroll.com/waterski/lift_move_04/Boat_lift.pdf or dock to move our lifts. Then pick them up with a buddies Skid Steer with long forks.

http://www.tmcowners.com/photopost/uploads/126/IMG_1897www.jpg

Notice we use the CC for pulling lifts and installing the course, but MC’s for skiers!

http://www.tmcowners.com/photopost/uploads/126/IMG_1890www.jpg

bigmac
10-02-2006, 07:06 PM
They just pulled my lifts and dock this afternoon. Took 'em 1/2 hour. Three lifts, nine 10-foot dock sections. They charged me $240 total. Each full-size boat lift is $60. A bargain, IMHO.

Naturally, it's 75 degrees and sunny. All the more poignant.

http://mccollister.info/boatliftout1.jpg

http://mccollister.info/boatliftout2.jpg

Workin' 4 Toys
10-03-2006, 08:40 AM
In about 3 weeks, we will be pulling the pier and lifts. We shall see if we end up with your approach BM, when the time comes.....:o

llaker
04-05-2011, 10:02 PM
4 plastic wheels from Northern Tool or anywhere else who sell them now and some (about 40 feet) of 1.5" pipe, 4 elbows and 4 - 2" tees and some hefty U bolts. Once you've got it on wheels you can use a truck or a winch or a few people to move it. I move it from dry land to just into the water by hand then use some tow straps and the boat to pull it into place through about a foot of mud in the spring. In fall the wheels/"pipe levers" pop it out of the mud, connect the straps to the truck and pull it out. Total distance it travels is about 200 feet in then 200 feet out.