PDA

View Full Version : Powerloading tips?


kpgotgame
09-29-2006, 07:21 AM
I now have a season of inboard boating under my belt and loved every minute of it. It took me about a month to build up the nerve to powerload my boat. It is not my nature to be cautious however this was probably brought on by my buddies first attempt with my old boat. He mis-judged the strength of the current and the back end swung out and hit a pole.
anyway...I am very happy that I gave in and started powerloading. No more constant in and out on the ramp to get my boat perfectly straight on the trailer. I am by no means an expert but the convenience of powerloading is great. I sometimes question how deep to put my trailer in, this is more troublesome when someone else backs the trailer in for me. My worry is that if I have it in to deep that the nose of my boat will jam under the slide on the trailer instead of sliding on top. A buddy suggested marking the appropriate water line on my trailer - Good Idea or any tips??

Ben
09-29-2006, 07:29 AM
Rather than marking it, I think a common method is to look at the trailer tire fenders relative to the waterline. For example, you may want them about an inch under the waterline.

This is assuming you use the same ramp. Different ramp could mean different req'd depth, as it will depend on the slope of the ramp.

kpgotgame
09-29-2006, 08:34 AM
Thanks Ben, that is exactly what I have been doing. I do however use a couple different ramps. So I guess the answer will come from repetition. I am sure that once I do it enough I will learn how to judge how deep it needs to be depending on the pitch of the ramp. Any horror stories in regards to this out there?

#47of100TeamMC
09-29-2006, 08:46 AM
Make sure the bunks are wet when you are powerloading. back the trailer in all the way first to soak the bunks, then pull it out until your fenders are just about to come out of the water. Powerloading with dry bunks will get you some sweet scratches in your hull.

I can't powerload at the lake I usually go to. The concrete pad doesn't go far enough, and it creates a BIG hole which in turn creates a BIG pile of rocks after that. So that's fun to drag the running gear through. The best is when Bass Boats powerload with a trimmed up motor, That pile of rocks almost reaches the surface of the water. :rant:

H20skeefreek
09-29-2006, 08:47 AM
in my experience, "powerloading" is rarely beneficial, damaging to the ramp, and just un-necessary (could be unsafe too, you could end up with a boat in your tailgate). You always have someone with you right? Why not have the other person just attach the winch strap while you pull on, allowing you to gradually get off the gas? I just don't see the point. If you have to "powerload" to keep the boat at the winch stand, then I'd say you are too far in the water, and If you have to "powerload" to get it there, you aren't deep enough.

kpgotgame
09-29-2006, 09:06 AM
Maybe I am ignorant to the terminology.
Drive on might better describe what I am doing.
This is what I am doing
- Line things up and drive the boat on part way
- The other person attaches the chain and strap
- He winches as I throttle it on all the way. This generally does not take to much throttle.

When I was winching it all the way I had to have the trailer really deep in the water which caused the boat to float around when I pulled it out which in turn caused me to have to go in and out several times to get it straight. Am I making sense to anybody?

Maybe my non-factory trailer is a contributing factor aswell.

...we seem to have it down to a science on our primary ramp now.

Upper Michigan Prostar190
09-29-2006, 09:08 AM
I find the ramp angle makes a big difference of how far the trailer goes in the lake. if the ramp angle is too much, it makes it a bit tricky. I find its best to get the bunks wet too. I like powerloading. its very easy, and simple. set boat buddy, back in trailer, drive boat on, CLICK!, pull boat out! SIMPLE and EASY! Bless the man who invented the boat buddy! :D

OhioProstar
09-29-2006, 09:10 AM
I am going to have to disagree with H20 on this. IMHO powerloading is the simplest method to load a boat...period. If you have the trailer fenders just under the water line and come in slow all you need to do is let the boat adjust itself on the bunks. Once you have stopped forward progress you simply give the boat a little gas and let your partner, if you have a boat buddy, set the pin, then crank the strap tight. On and off the ramp in less than two minutes. I have loaded inboards for more than 10 years and never came close to pushing into the tailgate.

6ballsisall
09-29-2006, 09:11 AM
^^^^ As professor UMP said. It's all about ramp angle. The lake our course is on is a very low angle ramp, I really don't have to powerload at all. On the lake we live on, it's pretty steep, I give it a little juice. On my trialer I find being a little deeper in the water helps. I put about 3" of water between the fenders and the water line.

NeilM
09-29-2006, 10:44 AM
Bless the man who invented the boat buddy! :D

Agreed. Cheers for "Boat Buddy".:toast: My wife and I have it down to a science. I back the trailer down the ramp and into the water to soak the bunks as she lines up for it; a few seconds after the trailer stops moving; she drives up, and CLICK; then up the ramp we go. Total time on the ramp is under 3 minutes, and when you compare that to Weekend Wally who ties up the ramp for 20 minutes or more with his multiple attempts to get cranked on [then drags the skeg on the concrete], it leaves the spectators standing there with their mouths open. It's a self-serving ego booster for us, but what the heck, we'll take it where we can get it:cool:

cwright
09-29-2006, 11:10 AM
http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/chriswright04/winchjack.jpgMaybe I'm confused here. I have a 88PS190, and my the trailer has one of the infamous straps, and the bow rests in a small v. My winch strap does not pull my boat into the v, it only pulls the bow down. If I go too deep with my trailer, my stern is floating and pulling out over stresses my bow eye and strap. If I go shallow, (top of fender), I HAVE to power on to get my bow eye up to the bloody strap. I have thought of redesigning the whole set up so that I, (or my wife) can simply winch it on and not have to power on. I don't mind driving onto my bunks, but the amount of throttle I have to give it to align my bow eye with my metal strap is troubling. Has anybody found the perfect solution to this?

Upper Michigan Prostar190
09-29-2006, 11:11 AM
Agreed. Cheers for "Boat Buddy".:toast: My wife and I have it down to a science. I back the trailer down the ramp and into the water to soak the bunks as she lines up for it; a few seconds after the trailer stops moving; she drives up, and CLICK; then up the ramp we go. Total time on the ramp is under 3 minutes, and when you compare that to Weekend Wally who ties up the ramp for 20 minutes or more with his multiple attempts to get cranked on [then drags the skeg on the concrete], it leaves the spectators standing there with their mouths open. It's a self-serving ego booster for us, but what the heck, we'll take it where we can get it:cool:
Neil, I also love the look on Wally's face(s) when I load my MC and drive it right on, click, pull out boat. They just are amazed at it! I love it!:D

Ric
09-29-2006, 11:19 AM
I now have a season of inboard boating under my belt and loved every minute of it. It took me about a month to build up the nerve to powerload my boat. It is not my nature to be cautious however this was probably brought on by my buddies first attempt with my old boat. He mis-judged the strength of the current and the back end swung out and hit a pole.
anyway...I am very happy that I gave in and started powerloading. No more constant in and out on the ramp to get my boat perfectly straight on the trailer. I am by no means an expert but the convenience of powerloading is great. I sometimes question how deep to put my trailer in, this is more troublesome when someone else backs the trailer in for me. My worry is that if I have it in to deep that the nose of my boat will jam under the slide on the trailer instead of sliding on top. A buddy suggested marking the appropriate water line on my trailer - Good Idea or any tips?? You don't need to powerload at all if you getcha some of deese.

chudson
09-29-2006, 11:22 AM
Sorry to bust the flow here but does "Boat Buddy" work on an older trailer say an "81"? And where can you get it if so?

Whoops dumb question, found it!!!

nuckinfutz
09-29-2006, 11:38 AM
I feel the boat buddy is a great idea sometimes! Great to click in and go, but dont forget to crank the winch down while you have the boat in the water. If you dont relieve some of the pressure on the pin, 2 things happen. 1) the pin bends if it slides back a little bit. 2) Difficult to get the boat back off of the trailer when you arrive at the next ramp. If the boat is resting on the pin and the tension is prohibiting you pulling the pin back you have to launch the boat (floating) then crank the winch foward to relieve the pressure so you can pull. This is an extreme circumstance and doesnt always happen. I Unloaded on a rather shallow launch before with my pin stuck (bent back too). I had already pulled the trailer as far back as I possible could due to the end of the concrete on the ramp, and my winch did not have enough power to pull the boat foward. The winch handle wound up stripping. Long story short, out came the knife, and I cut the strap. I was not about sit on shore for the weekend. Im sure there probably was a better way to deal with the situation, but I was under pressure! The line for launching was long and I needed to get out there.

I do love the boat buddy when it comes time for loading, but unloading sometimes is a pain.

cwright
09-29-2006, 11:46 AM
I've had a similar thing happen when my boat had come to rest on the back of the groove of my strap. I couldn't pry the strap down, and I couldn't winch it forward. Finally had to start the boat up, and give if enough throttle to take the weight off of the strap while applying down pressure, and it worked (the strap feel off of the bow eye). Of couse the boats on the ramp really appreciated the stirring of the waters, but what else could I do?

rick s.
09-29-2006, 11:51 AM
we always powerload. It's just not possible to winch up an x45...

hacker
09-29-2006, 11:51 AM
...it leaves the spectators standing there with their mouths open.

This truly is one of the perks of a boat buddy equipped trailer.

TMCNo1
09-29-2006, 02:07 PM
Boat loadings Last Great Act of Defiance!!!!!!! Arm Boat Buddy, I back trailer into the water to proper depth [in our case, fenders 1" above the water], wife drives boat straight into trailer at a reasonable slow speed, boat settles into the bunks, light power up to Boat Buddy, boweye trips Boat Buddy, Click, attach winch hook, safety cable and proceed to tiedown area, all of 3 minutes consumed. Snug up winch strap, wipe down. IT AIN'T ROCKET SCIENCE!

Ric
09-29-2006, 02:31 PM
Boat loadings Last Great Act of Defiance!!!!!!! Arm Boat Buddy, I back trailer into the water to proper depth [in our case, fenders 1" above the water], wife drives boat straight into trailer at a reasonable slow speed, boat settles into the bunks, light power up to Boat Buddy, boweye trips Boat Buddy, Click, attach winch hook, safety cable and proceed to tiedown area, all of 3 minutes consumed. Snug up winch strap, wipe down. IT AIN'T ROCKET SCIENCE! Cmon down to Texas, I'll let you trailer my 197:rolleyes:

Upper Michigan Prostar190
09-29-2006, 02:36 PM
You don't need to powerload at all if you getcha some of deese.
Ric what are those??:confused:

peason
09-29-2006, 03:18 PM
http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/chriswright04/winchjack.jpgMaybe I'm confused here. I have a 88PS190, and my the trailer has one of the infamous straps, and the bow rests in a small v. My winch strap does not pull my boat into the v, it only pulls the bow down. If I go too deep with my trailer, my stern is floating and pulling out over stresses my bow eye and strap. If I go shallow, (top of fender), I HAVE to power on to get my bow eye up to the bloody strap. I have thought of redesigning the whole set up so that I, (or my wife) can simply winch it on and not have to power on. I don't mind driving onto my bunks, but the amount of throttle I have to give it to align my bow eye with my metal strap is troubling. Has anybody found the perfect solution to this?

Do a search on this forum - someone on here has re-done his trailer to be able to mount a boat buddy on it. You are on the right track as far as considering a re-design.

hacker
09-29-2006, 03:52 PM
Do a search on this forum - someone on here has re-done his trailer to be able to mount a boat buddy on it. You are on the right track as far as considering a re-design.

I actually ran across that earlier today:

http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=5427&page=2

Post #17-20

TMCNo1
09-29-2006, 06:55 PM
Sorry to bust the flow here but does "Boat Buddy" work on an older trailer say an "81"? And where can you get it if so?

Whoops dumb question, found it!!!


You already have a winch, your dealer can get the Boat Buddy and long boweye from any marine distributor or MC, the stand and brace from MC and if you pm me your name and address, I will send you a copy of MC's dimensions on how to set it up on your trailer. I installed one on our '89 in '97 when I redid our trailer.

RickDV
09-29-2006, 09:39 PM
http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/chriswright04/winchjack.jpgMaybe I'm confused here. I have a 88PS190, and my the trailer has one of the infamous straps, and the bow rests in a small v. My winch strap does not pull my boat into the v, it only pulls the bow down. If I go too deep with my trailer, my stern is floating and pulling out over stresses my bow eye and strap. If I go shallow, (top of fender), I HAVE to power on to get my bow eye up to the bloody strap. I have thought of redesigning the whole set up so that I, (or my wife) can simply winch it on and not have to power on. I don't mind driving onto my bunks, but the amount of throttle I have to give it to align my bow eye with my metal strap is troubling. Has anybody found the perfect solution to this?

I have the same set up as you do. I would love to install a boat buddy, but that is going to have to come after several other enhancements (e.g. perfect pass, bimini, depth finder, etc.) In the mean time we continue to fine tune the trailering operation.

What we have found to work well is to back the trailer in with fenders about 2-3" below waterline. My son will drive the boat slowly up to the V bunk and get the boat centered on the trailer. I then push him back about 4-5 feet. He gently powers foward with just enough power to latch the safety bar. It has taken some practice but it is working well for us.

I have seen (and experienced) too much damage to my boat and trailer from too much power when loading. Also, most ramps in our area prohibit power loading due to ramp damage. It's often hard to comply but we do our best.

RickDV

H20skeefreek
09-29-2006, 10:43 PM
it's all semantics. I don't winch mine on, it's an impossibility with mine, I have the "strap". I just put my fenders about 1" below the water, my wife drives up very slowly, barely applies any gas at all. I'm there to hook the eye, I give her the stop hand, she backs off and we are done. If you don't put the trailer in far enough you have to stay on the gas to keep the boat in place, destroying the ramp. If you put it in too deep, you don't end up straight (I know, in my earlier post I said it backward)

cwright,
I used to hate that "strap" but I've really gotten used to it and like it now, the boat loads effortlessly. I've thought of redesigning it just in case the boat ever looses power. It is a b#$%h to load if the boat is broken down. You have to dunk the trailer REALLY deep to get it on.

Archimedes
09-29-2006, 11:05 PM
I am going to have to disagree with H20 on this. IMHO powerloading is the simplest method to load a boat...period. If you have the trailer fenders just under the water line and come in slow all you need to do is let the boat adjust itself on the bunks. Once you have stopped forward progress you simply give the boat a little gas and let your partner, if you have a boat buddy, set the pin, then crank the strap tight. On and off the ramp in less than two minutes. I have loaded inboards for more than 10 years and never came close to pushing into the tailgate.

Totally agree. I've powerloaded every single time I've ever loaded our boats. I usually don't even attach the winch until the eye has clicked into the boat buddy. Probably done this a hundred times, never a problem and never a scratch on the hull from the bunks. Don't know why you'd ever winch up if you know the right depth to put your trailer in the water. I start based on my fenders then I check how deep the bunks are and adjust accordingly.

SKI*MC
09-29-2006, 11:51 PM
haha, anyone else notice the vehicles in the backround? Which on pulls the boat?

TMCNo1
09-30-2006, 08:31 AM
haha, anyone else notice the vehicles in the backround? Which on pulls the boat?


Ski*MC is paying attention!
With the old car, you would never have to worry about blowing a tire at high speed. heating up the wheel bearings or using up much brakes. In it's day it probably made a great tow vehicle!

nuckinfutz
09-30-2006, 09:33 PM
Just got back from the dealer looking to buy another Boat Buddy. After talking to him for a bit, Things made sense. He told me that I should never transport with the pin in. always pull the boat out of the water, then attach the winch and crank down a few turns (enough to release the pin). He said you will most likley never have to try to drag the boat foward with the winch.

Does every one leave there pin in during transport?

erkoehler
09-30-2006, 09:36 PM
yes........

east tx skier
09-30-2006, 09:40 PM
Does every one leave there pin in during transport?

When I was still using boat buddy, no. I always pulled the pin out before hitting the road. Just used it to get the boat up the ramp.

TMCNo1
09-30-2006, 10:35 PM
Just got back from the dealer looking to buy another Boat Buddy. After talking to him for a bit, Things made sense. He told me that I should never transport with the pin in. always pull the boat out of the water, then attach the winch and crank down a few turns (enough to release the pin). He said you will most likley never have to try to drag the boat foward with the winch.

Does every one leave there pin in during transport?


Always, never found a logical reason to do away with another safety feature to keep the boat attached to the trailer. If the winch strap, strap hook or the winch fails and the pin is locked in the open position, without a safety cable or chain, what happens then? I assume everyone who has a Boat Buddy and transports their boat with the pin locked in the open position, has a safety chain or cable as a backup, right?

nuckinfutz
09-30-2006, 11:43 PM
Always, never found a logical reason to do away with another safety feature to keep the boat attached to the trailer. If the winch strap, strap hook or the winch fails and the pin is locked in the open position, without a safety cable or chain, what happens then? I assume everyone who has a Boat Buddy and transports their boat with the pin locked in the open position, has a safety chain or cable as a backup, right?


That was one of my questions to him today. We walked around in the shop and looked at alot of other used boats/trailers and to my amazement, few had saftey chains. He was telling me that the older Boat buddies used to lable them on the side as set, locked and transport. Transport meaning open. Now I know that this in another persons opinion and theres a possibility that he confused the positions.

I have a bent pin and not exactly sure why since I did buy the boat used.

6ballsisall
10-01-2006, 12:08 AM
No safety chain on mine. However I wish it did. I keep the Boat Buddy locked during travel. I'd rather mess up the boat buddy if the strap broke then increase the chance of loosing the boat.

billr
10-01-2006, 07:57 AM
Pin locked. I'll buy another one if I have to!!

TMCNo1
10-01-2006, 08:35 AM
That was one of my questions to him today. We walked around in the shop and looked at alot of other used boats/trailers and to my amazement, few had saftey chain. He was telling me that the older Boat buddies used to lable them on the side as set, locked and transport. Transport meaning open. Now I know that this in another persons opinion and theres a possibility that he confused the positions.

I have a bent pin and not exactly sure why since I did buy the boat used.


I have the original Boat Buddy and plastic housing that I installed on our trailer in 1997, then the manufacturer applied decals to the housing on the left side that says "SAFETY [open], CLOSED[pin in boweye], SET, [armed, ready to trip]" and a instruction sheet on how to use the Boat Buddy. Because the decals failed occasionally to stick to the plastic, they started casting the 3 words [same as above] into the plastic on recent models I have seen. Maybe they have changed the wording or someone is selling cheap black market, counterfeit, inferior imitations. I have several sets of replacement decals for mine should they come off.

JohnnyB
10-01-2006, 06:33 PM
Powerloading is the way to go as long as the ramp isn't too steep. With an extremely steep ramp, the only thing stopping the boat may be the bearing buddy as the boat won't touch the bunks.

Also, some ramps wash out very easily and power loading creates erosion problems that trash the ramp -- the ramp on our lake has this issue.

All that being said, I love it when we're at a busy ramp and are in and out of the water in under two minutes while all the wally's stare in awe....truck backs in as boat is coming up, truck stops, driver gases boat, "click", shut motor down, pull boat out....:D

These are the same ramps where I've usually got the boat in the water, kids in it, truck parked and underway long before the next guy has his trailer in the water....

billr
10-01-2006, 09:15 PM
If enjoyed watching other people stare at me with their mouths open, as I drive on the trailer, cut the engine off, and get out to drive away. One young lady said they needed something like the boat buddy. I said you get what you pay for!!

TMCNo1
10-02-2006, 09:41 AM
Last trip to the lake, the wife drove by a boat being held against the pier with a very small rope by a guys wife and their little boy, next to the ramp while approching the trailer. My wife did her usual masterful job of driving around them and hitting the trailer perfect and click we were outa there. My wife was just laughing when we got up to the tie down area and I asked her what was so funny? The little boy had looked up at his mom and said, " Mommie, did you see what that lady did with that boat, why can't you do that with our boat?" The mother said, "Ask your daddy!"

NeilM
10-02-2006, 11:49 AM
Always, never found a logical reason to do away with another safety feature to keep the boat attached to the trailer. If the winch strap, strap hook or the winch fails and the pin is locked in the open position, without a safety cable or chain, what happens then? I assume everyone who has a Boat Buddy and transports their boat with the pin locked in the open position, has a safety chain or cable as a backup, right?

Yep.. In fact, I had a strap break on me this summer, so it put a lot of strain on the pin (I use the strap to keep pressure off the pin).

east tx skier
10-02-2006, 12:24 PM
I assume everyone who has a Boat Buddy and transports their boat with the pin locked in the open position, has a safety chain or cable as a backup, right?

Yes. I've got more confidence in the additional strap than I did in the boat buddy pin when I was using boat buddy. When they make a boat buddy that doesn't leave black marks on the boat without my having to carpet it, I'll buy another one. As of now, they have no plans to do this I'm told.

TMCNo1
10-02-2006, 02:29 PM
Yes. I've got more confidence in the additional strap than I did in the boat buddy pin when I was using boat buddy. When they make a boat buddy that doesn't leave black marks on the boat without my having to carpet it, I'll buy another one. As of now, they have no plans to do this I'm told.
Doug, some contact cement and boat carpet molded to the areas the bow may touch will cure the potential for marks. Ours has been covered for 9 years now, just hit the carpet once a year with spray wax and a couple coats of wax in the bow area a couple times a year and it all good!

pepi
10-02-2006, 04:21 PM
http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k6/chriswright04/winchjack.jpgMaybe I'm confused here. I have a 88PS190, and my the trailer has one of the infamous straps, and the bow rests in a small v. My winch strap does not pull my boat into the v, it only pulls the bow down. If I go too deep with my trailer, my stern is floating and pulling out over stresses my bow eye and strap. If I go shallow, (top of fender), I HAVE to power on to get my bow eye up to the bloody strap. I have thought of redesigning the whole set up so that I, (or my wife) can simply winch it on and not have to power on. I don't mind driving onto my bunks, but the amount of throttle I have to give it to align my bow eye with my metal strap is troubling. Has anybody found the perfect solution to this?


I have an 88 with the same setup and always powerload. I find that on a shallow ramp, I'll put the trailer as far into the water as I can, and basically float right on to the bunks. On a steep ramp, this doesnt work as I end up pushing right into the v-block (or whatever you call it)instead of sliding up it. If I have about 2 inches on the fender above water, then the boat rides up on the bunks and the approach to the v-block is a bit less drastic. Works every time.
Also, as mentioned in other threads, I always soak the bunks first.