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View Full Version : Garage heat...........???


Workin' 4 Toys
09-26-2006, 08:46 AM
What do you use to heat your garage......... or have plans to??

shepherd
09-26-2006, 09:04 AM
No heat in the garage here. My buddy up in Maryland put an old oil-burning furnace in his detached garage/shop. Works great.

jmac197
09-26-2006, 09:16 AM
I have a 24x24 garage and use a natural gas blue flame ventless heater. I can't recall how many BTUs.

It's not really the cleanest burning though. After five years I have soot that has somehow worked through the walls and is coming out the siding. It's no big deal to clean....sponge and soapy water, but if it's on the walls it's in your lungs. It's also a bit smelly.

If I did it again I would go with a direct vent unit, but the house was new and I had a thing about cutting holes in the wall or roof. That was a phase that has past. I'd definately drill now. Worth the trade offs.

Later
Jim

Workin' 4 Toys
09-26-2006, 09:24 AM
Jim, I take it this means it doesn't exhaust outside?
And the flame is exposed?

jmac197
09-26-2006, 09:34 AM
The flame is behind tempered glass and is supposed to be like 95% clean burning so they say it doesn't need to be vented. They sell these things as supplimental heat inside houses. I don't think I'd do that.

Check out this link. It's the one I have

http://www.fmconline.net/comfortglow/heaters/gwn30t.html

It's a cinch to install. You just have to be comfortable running the black pipe for the gas.

I'll turn the heater on when I get home from work if I'm going to be doing something in the garage that night. My wife likes it because it will stay around 50 degrees when she gets in her car in the AM.

It does work well. I also have a couple of ceiling fans to circulate the heat.

Oh another thing....because it does not vent the exhaust to the outside, the moisture created during the combustion also stays in the garage. It can get a bit humid in there as well.

Jim

jlf
09-26-2006, 09:47 AM
We are in the process of installing the radiant floor heat in the shop we just built, I think we are going to heat the water with one of those outdoor wood stoves. Father-in-law has the radiant floor heat in his shop and it is the way to go. Wish we'd have spent the money and heated our garage floors too. I'm interested also in what others have done to heat there garages, as we too are looking for a way to heat the garage now.

quincyfirefighter
09-26-2006, 09:57 AM
I have a oil monitor that heats my garage. Toyo is another brand also that would work. Just make sure that you get a sealed combustion heater or Direct Vent system. With the chance of gas fumes in a garage setting well you get the picture :eek: In my area building codes state that any heater system in a garage setting be 18" off the floor and be sealed combustion. Would hate to see you or your family get hurt. ;) In my line of work I see alot of house fires that start in the garage :firejump:

Maristar210
09-26-2006, 11:42 AM
WFT

I use this one. http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_503598_503598

Heats up the whole place in a few minutes and is adjustable to keep it warm in there....

Steve

Workin' 4 Toys
09-26-2006, 12:55 PM
Would hate to see you or your family get hurt. ;) In my line of work I see alot of house fires that start in the garage :firejump:
This is 1st on my list of precautions...... Same reason I will elevate the refrigerator OFF the floor.

Workin' 4 Toys
09-26-2006, 02:31 PM
WFT

I use this one. http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_503598_503598

Heats up the whole place in a few minutes and is adjustable to keep it warm in there....

Steve
I was thinking Something alittle more permanent.

jmac197
09-26-2006, 02:55 PM
The comfort glo that I used is permenant and easy to install, but the more I think about Qfirefighter's comments, I don't know if I could recommend it. It doesn't have a sealed combustion chamber so I can't do any kind of spray painting with the air compressor or varnishing. Boom with the fumes. But it was like $200 and easy.

trickskier
09-26-2006, 03:16 PM
Sorry, no help here. If it gets cold enough for me to heat my garage I'm moving further SOUTH!

Maristar210
09-26-2006, 04:16 PM
I was thinking Something alittle more permanent.


I hear ya WFT, but this is versitale and mobile. I have an 80# Propane tank from my welding supply house so tanks are not a pain to change. If I had unlimited garage funds...

I would have this hard piped in http://www.rezspec.com/catalog-udas.html

But I don't even have my garage drywalled yet....

Steve

justinlkgb
09-26-2006, 04:48 PM
I had a friend that used a wood burner. Granted the garage was so small only one compact car would fit. We used the garage for poker. Heated very well,smokey though. It was piped through the roof. I think he even picked it up for free as long as he came and got it!! :twocents:

Footin
09-26-2006, 05:11 PM
I vent our clothes dryer into the garage in the winter. My wife seems to do a load of wash almost every night and even if she doesn't I turn the dryer on and it warmes up pretty quick if I have something to do out there.


Kinda cheap way to keep it warm(er).

lav
09-26-2006, 05:16 PM
popular method around here is closed looped glycol system in concrete
you have to installplastic tubing in concrete floor
some type of water heater (either nat gas propane or electric)
it heats glycol mixture and circulates it through the tubing
heats conrete (no more working on cold concrete)and heats entire garage
pretty efficent also
if i was building new this is the way i would go

milkmania
09-26-2006, 05:21 PM
I vent our clothes dryer into the garage in the winter. My wife seems to do a load of wash almost every night and even if she doesn't I turn the dryer on and it warmes up pretty quick if I have something to do out there.


Kinda cheap way to keep it warm(er).



pfft! if you didn't use it, it would otherwise be wasted heat:twocents:

I heat the sub floor under our house the same way;)

Workin' 4 Toys
09-27-2006, 07:30 AM
I hear ya WFT, but this is versitale and mobile. I have an 80# Propane tank from my welding supply house so tanks are not a pain to change. If I had unlimited garage funds...

I would have this hard piped in http://www.rezspec.com/catalog-udas.html

But I don't even have my garage drywalled yet....

Steve
Dayton Separated Combustion Heater

Workin' 4 Toys
09-27-2006, 07:33 AM
This is the only thing I don't like about radiant floor heat.
I need instant gratification. I want to maintain 50 degrees all the time. And get 70 when I want it to work within minutes. When I am done back to 50. I would never be able to do that with radiant.

dpolen
09-27-2006, 08:42 AM
popular method around here is closed looped glycol system in concrete
you have to installplastic tubing in concrete floor
some type of water heater (either nat gas propane or electric)
it heats glycol mixture and circulates it through the tubing
heats conrete (no more working on cold concrete)and heats entire garage
pretty efficent also
if i was building new this is the way i would go

lav...any idea on what something like this would cost? I'm getting ready to build a new house with an attached 4 car garage. I was going to purchase one of the direct vent units ($400-$500), but if this is cheaper/more efficient, I'm all ears.

Workin' 4 Toys
09-27-2006, 09:34 AM
To get you in the "ballpark"
tubing- $400
boiler - $1500
exhaust- $200
pumps and controls- $500

dpolen
09-27-2006, 10:00 AM
To get you in the "ballpark"
tubing- $400
boiler - $1500
exhaust- $200
pumps and controls- $500

Yikes...I think I need to sell more next quarter if I want that. Looks like a direct-vent unit will likely be in my future.

Workin' 4 Toys
09-27-2006, 01:59 PM
Yikes...I think I need to sell more next quarter if I want that. Looks like a direct-vent unit will likely be in my future.
Considering what the 3rd and 4th car additons will be, this is nothing.....;)
Not my prefered choice of heat anyway.

Monte
09-27-2006, 02:07 PM
Just a suggestion, I use two of those old style lookin electric radiators with internal oil from Wally World... keeps my dogs and toys extremely toasty.. 39.95 each...

jimmer2880
09-27-2006, 05:54 PM
Just a suggestion, I use two of those old style lookin electric radiators with internal oil from Wally World... keeps my dogs and toys extremely toasty.. 39.95 each...

Be careful with those... don't let them age at all. I have a buddy of mine who lost his entire house (ok - his house had wheels - but that's another story) because one of those electric-oil heaters exploded in the middle of the night.

It really got fun when the fire started exploding all of his ammo.

Ric
09-27-2006, 06:02 PM
Be careful with those... don't let them age at all. I have a buddy of mine who lost his entire house (ok - his house had wheels - but that's another story) because one of those electric-oil heaters exploded in the middle of the night.

It really got fun when the fire started exploding all of his ammo. didnt that happen in Waco in '93?

Kevin 89MC
09-27-2006, 06:23 PM
WFT, just peeking in here quick, I've researched this topic a bit myself. I'm dreaming about infrared heaters like this: http://www.rg-inc.com/caribe-infrared-garage-heater.htm
I've heard they are really good - they heat the objects, not the air. I think they are a bit more than a standard fan powered heater, but cleaner, and quicker than radiant.
Good luck,
Kevin

bigmac
09-27-2006, 06:36 PM
Jeez, complicated approaches to heating a garage. Why don't you just go with the obvious - a ceiling-mounted forced air 30,000 - 50,000 BTU natural gas heater (http://templates.earthstores.com/1277/proddetail.asp?id=68766163646973747269627574696F6E&prod=409628)? Cost you about $500-$600 + install if you don't do it yourself (it's pretty simple - especially if side-vented).

If you're going to heat the garage, definitely don't forget to put at least one floor drain for every two stalls.

lav
09-27-2006, 09:25 PM
To get you in the "ballpark"
tubing- $400
boiler - $1500
exhaust- $200
pumps and controls- $500

boiler not nessasary can use a hot water tank $200
pump and motor can be had for $200
the controls can be ball valves
dont know what exhaust is for
tubing price is probally pretty close
i am not a pipe fitter so i dont have alot of backroud on this but i am an electrican and have seen this installed in various ways and situations but ithink a little research can save you some coins if you need details i can ask pipe fitter friends

sorry so vague your post was just asking for ideas

Workin' 4 Toys
09-28-2006, 08:34 AM
Jeez, complicated approaches to heating a garage.
You think this in complicated, let's talk about.........





8p

Workin' 4 Toys
09-28-2006, 08:42 AM
sorry so vague your post was just asking for ideas
That's all right.;)
I was on the conservative side of how I priced it out just for comparison, seen the price of copper lately? The exhaust would be for the boiler to be vented outside.
The controls would be for opening and closing valves to transmit the water through the lines when the system calls for heat, since you would need to pump 160 degree water through it constantly.
And with a large enough garage, would probably benefit from a couple different zones to get equal amounts of heat. And since radiant floor heat in on the menu, might as well tie it into basement floors, bathroom floors, and towel racks.

Workin' 4 Toys
09-28-2006, 08:51 AM
WFT, just peeking in here quick, I've researched this topic a bit myself. I'm dreaming about infrared heaters like this: http://www.rg-inc.com/caribe-infrared-garage-heater.htm
I've heard they are really good - they heat the objects, not the air. I think they are a bit more than a standard fan powered heater, but cleaner, and quicker than radiant.
Good luck,
Kevin
I've also heard of them baking the paint off cars if not used appropriately. I wonder how it effects canvas covers and fiberglass if at all....:confused:
I've checked into there too. From LARGE to very small. Seems like a good source of supplemental heat, having them on all the time, I am not sure.

lav
09-28-2006, 07:33 PM
not to step on toes here i assumed electeric heater
and all the systems i have seen was plastic tubing(burst resistent)
and the system were on or off if you want to shut off zone close ball valve
i understand you can get as high tech with cotrols but for a basic garage i think you could save some money with basic controls
like isaid not an expert in this field just adding my two cents

Workin' 4 Toys
09-29-2006, 08:47 AM
not to step on toes here
Don't sweat it. I encourage debate.;) :D

The tubing that has to go under/in the concrete is plastic, but depending on the location of the boiler/heater being electric or gas, the exposed piping should be copper or similar. So I'd run the lines from the heater/pumps, to the header in copper, and from the header/valves into the "tubing" (underground) in plastic. Also assuming the boiler/heater would be located somewhere OTHER than the garage itself, like a basement or attic. Why give up valuable floor space in the garage right.
Depending on the size of the areas to be heated, it would need some significant amounts of heat and/or significant amounts of "stored"(tank) heat to make a difference.
Not to mention the amounts of heat loss transfered through the ground it would have to make up for.

Workin' 4 Toys
09-29-2006, 08:50 AM
There are ALOT less people on here heating their garages than I thought. Must be alot more people on here(TMC) in Florida and Cali. than I thought....:(

bcampbe7
09-29-2006, 08:58 AM
I have a ventless gas heater from Lowes. I keep a CO monitor in the garage just in case. Being in Tennessee, I don't have to use it all that much but it is there if I need it.
It heats great. The only thing I wish I had (and they are easy enough to add) is a ceiling fan. Something to think about when heating a garage.

Monte
09-29-2006, 09:03 AM
If the garage is attached you may check with the HAVAC man to see the cost of adding additional vents to your existing unit. I know there has to be a constant pressure, so this may not work, but it is worth a shot. HAVAC people should be able to tell you.. Could save some $$. If it is detached, check the window units...you dont have to have a window. just hide it on the back/ out of sight somewhere. just some low cost options there....

bcampbe7
09-29-2006, 09:09 AM
If the garage is attached you may check with the HAVAC man to see the cost of adding additional vents to your existing unit. I know there has to be a constant pressure, so this may not work, but it is worth a shot. HAVAC people should be able to tell you.. Could save some $$. If it is detached, check the window units...you dont have to have a window. just hide it on the back/ out of sight somewhere. just some low cost options there....


W4T's is rich... He don't need the low cost options! :D :rolleyes:

Workin' 4 Toys
09-29-2006, 09:20 AM
W4T's is rich... He don't need the low cost options! :rolleyes:
Thanks Beau... I needed that laugh......:purplaugh :uglyhamme

I'd prefer to think of it as doing it once and doing it right......

Monte
09-29-2006, 09:20 AM
W4T's is rich... He don't need the low cost options! :D :rolleyes:

In that case go for an additional central HAVAC unit just for the garage, then you can maintain a constant heat/ air level for the toys:D

Kevin 89MC
09-29-2006, 10:09 AM
I've also heard of them baking the paint off cars if not used appropriately. I wonder how it effects canvas covers and fiberglass if at all....:confused:
I've checked into there too. From LARGE to very small. Seems like a good source of supplemental heat, having them on all the time, I am not sure.
Good question, that would suck!

My previous house did have a conventional fan powered nat. gas heater hung from the ceiling, vented through the roof. Actually it was the wife's house, and the previous owner had one that he removed, so I put a new one back in when I moved in. In short, it worked great! I hooked up a regular t-stat and kept it at 40, then turned it up when I was out there working. We were only in that house 2 years, but I loved every minute in there with it. It was cheap, too, ~$350 for a 30,000 BTU heater IIRC. Garage was 2-1/2 car, it had no problem heating that space up quick.

It is probably what I'll do in my current garage as soon as I get around to insulating it.

Hammer
09-29-2006, 02:04 PM
I'm doing in floor heat and a Gas pack with A/C. I plan to use the floor heat to keep it above 45-50 then the gas pack to get to a comfy temp when working. Its a 32x44 building with 13 foot ceiling, that's why I though the floor heat would be best. Puts the heat down where you need it.