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View Full Version : Do you pull out your lift for the winter?


jkski
09-25-2006, 04:58 PM
As much as I hate to admit it, it is time to start thinking about the coming winter months. With that in mind, I wanted to see how many of you plan to pull your lift out of the water (that is if your lake will freeze) for the winter months. If not, how is your lift situated in that you don't get concerned about it?

Thanks in advance.

Rockman
09-25-2006, 06:05 PM
Our lake freezes well enough to drive a car on.

We pulled our lift out Labor Day Weekend since we won't be up there too much. It's pretty easy getting our boat in the lake from the garage...only about 2 blocks to trailer.

We use two car ties that are on spindles and they attached to the front of the lift. Then we get 2 to 3 guys to push the back end. It only takes about 5 minutes to get it on the beach. Much easier than trying to lift with a bunch of guys.

88 PS190
09-25-2006, 06:14 PM
Reciever buried in the ground w/ a bar that slips in w/ a pulley then you can use your boat to drag the lift up the bank, and then you drive off.

Or a tractor or truck and a V of cable, then alot of rope.

c640947
09-25-2006, 06:47 PM
Or you can buy a de-icer. Basically a device that churns the water and keeps the area around your dock and lift from ever freezing. My dad sells them and has more info on his site if you are interested.

88 PS190
09-25-2006, 06:50 PM
Deicers only work if your lake doesn't have ice movement

Small lakes you can, on a big lake even w/ a hole around your dock a break up in the ice can drag your lift and dock and destroy stuff.

wiltok
09-25-2006, 08:01 PM
PS190 - that is interesting information. We have ice movement on my lake - and was hoping to get a deicer for my pier and lift. I think you make a good point - no use in risking 12,000. in equipment...

88 PS190
09-25-2006, 08:21 PM
I wish we could use a de icer too, but it'd be a no go. Maybe if we had 12" pilings and a permanant dock it wouldn't be an issue, but for aluminum lifts and removable dock, its a no go.

Laurel_Lake_Skier
09-25-2006, 08:27 PM
Once a sheet of ice starts moving, a pier or lift will not stand a chance. It is a huge force! I've seen entire shorelines with 4' rocks that get pushed back and up several feet.

Of course the wind may not be blowing your way this year.....then you'll be fine.:rolleyes:

airwear
09-25-2006, 08:27 PM
I tie straps to the back legs of the lift and pull it out of the water and up the bank with my truck. My wife drives the truck and I stay near the lift making sure it is pulling nicely. 5 minutes of effort.

MasterCrafting
09-25-2006, 08:39 PM
Pull it out or it will get trashed...

T Scott
09-25-2006, 09:57 PM
I never pull my lift. Heck, the water temp only gets down to about 60 in the dead of winter!!:rolleyes: I love Florida!!!

jkski
09-26-2006, 09:27 AM
My lift sits on a small, protected slalom lake. All of the other members leave theirs in the water, however, they are surrounded by docks, whereas mine sits beside a boathouse with no protection on the other side. All of the others have stated that since the ice does not move around, it does not cause any problems, however since I've not had any personal experience with this, you guys/gals are my best source of info.

bigmac
09-26-2006, 10:33 AM
When the ice on our lake melts in the spring, it begins by pulling away from the shore. Once that happens the wind pushes a rather substantial ice sheet that will crumple even the most robust lifts like they were paper. Bubblers won't help a bit.

IMHO, it's asking for trouble to leave a lift or dock in a lake that freezes. I've seen many people try it, never seen anyone get away with it over the long haul.

VTJC
09-26-2006, 10:41 AM
I just pulled mine out Sunday. A bit early this year, but I leave boat hooked up to truck and can easily launch for fall skiing. Not worth the risk with ice shifting!

Jamie

boatless
09-26-2006, 11:13 AM
Yeah, removing lift from a sandy bottom is easy as 1,2,3. Try and remove your lift with mucks bottom, it will take you more than an hour and that is with five to six people. :mad: What I did was float the lift to shore and carry it on to dry land. Do that when you are young and bulky. :D

boatless.

bigmac
09-26-2006, 11:20 AM
Yeah, removing lift from a sandy bottom is easy as 1,2,3. Try and remove your lift with mug bottom, it will take you more than an hour and that is with five to six people. :mad: What I did was float the lift to shore and carry it on to dry land. Do that when you are young and bulky. :D

boatless.

My lift is 70 feet out, and that far out the bottom is fairly soft. Even so, getting the lift out couldn't be easier for me. I call my dock guy on the phone, he comes out and takes all three of my lifts out along with my dock, I give him $225. I come home from work and it's done.

boatless
09-26-2006, 12:06 PM
bigmac,
Why in the world would you need three lifts ? :D We have some thing like that at our lake also, but it is not going to be $225.00 for three lifts. Try $275 per lift, even that, I am considering going that route this year.

boatless

88 PS190
09-26-2006, 12:46 PM
our bottom is essentially graval, smooth round mainly around an inch in diameter, its like concrete for wheels to roll on.

jkski
09-26-2006, 01:08 PM
My lift goes through about 3-5 inches of muck, and then settles on a rock hard bottom. If I do deceide to risk it and leave it in, should I lift each one of the feet and place it on something like a treated pallet or car rim, to allow for sliding?

bigmac
09-26-2006, 01:23 PM
bigmac,
Why in the world would you need three lifts ? :D We have some thing like that at our lake also, but it is not going to be $225.00 for three lifts. Try $275 per lift, even that, I am considering going that route this year.


Multiple boats...:) The Whaler is easy because the lift is small and no canopy.

The $225 removal is for the three lifts AND nine 10-foot sections of dock. I should clarify that it costs the same for install at the beginning of the season. My dock guy comes out with 4 guys. The whole process takes the 5 of them about 1/2 hour.

http://www.pbase.com/hmac/image/63056377.jpg

Datdude
09-26-2006, 01:34 PM
Multiple boats...:) The Whaler is easy because the lift is small and no canopy.

The $225 removal is for the three lifts AND nine 10-foot sections of dock. I should clarify that it costs the same for install at the beginning of the season. My dock guy comes out with 4 guys. The whole process takes the 5 of them about 1/2 hour.

http://www.pbase.com/hmac/image/63056377.jpg


That is a BARGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Most services in this area are at least $150 per lift plus the dock

Jorski
09-26-2006, 01:50 PM
Or buy one of these bad boys...they are designed to stay in the ice:

http://www.vikingboatlift.com/photostwo.html


http://www.vikingboatlift.com/picture31.jpg

http://www.vikingboatlift.com/picture32.jpg

A guy on my lake has one for 5 years without incident.

bigmac
09-26-2006, 01:54 PM
That is a BARGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Most services in this area are at least $150 per lift plus the dock

It's a pretty standard price around here, although there is a guy who has a custom-built pontoon boat with a hydraulic fork lift attached. He uses that to pick up lifts and put them on the shore - nice for steep shores. He charges about $200 per lift. He had a busy year this year using that boat to lift boats off of boat lifts where the water level had dropped such that they weren't coming off any other way.

He tells me his (relatively) high price is because he has to get a permit each time he wants to transport his pontoon/fork lift due to the fact that it's oversize.

tones03
09-26-2006, 02:08 PM
We also pulled ours out on Labor Day weekend. Took 4 of us, we have very handy wheels that go on the bottom of the hoist, fit most hoists and very easy to move around. We put it on our beach, on side is far enough from the water with no worries, the other we put up on cinder blocks, about 3 high so the ice does not get it, never had any problems.