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rasmithaz
11-21-2004, 03:17 PM
Just dropped my recently purchased boat in the lake and I have a vibration at different rpm's. The vibration isn't horrible but it is definitely there. I replaced the strut bearings immediately after purchasing the boat. The existing forward bearing worked its way 'up' the strut. So I know my bearings are new and good. When I put it all together the prop, prop shaft, coupler and alighnment all looked good by eye. The prop shaft goes through the hull in the lower 1/2 of the hole but is not hitting the edge. After deceleration and putting the transmission in nuetral I get a rrr...rrr...rrr sound every time the prop shaft turns around once. When the prop stops turning the noise stops. I took the boat up to WOT once and it sounded like machine gun. Suggestions ? Thanks

André
11-21-2004, 03:35 PM
Was the vibration there bfore you change your strut bearings?
The coupler tolerance is .003 .i doubt that you would see it by eye.
Is your prop in good shape?

JimN
11-21-2004, 03:55 PM
Unless something is bent badly, you won't see it by eye. If the shaft has more than .005" total deflection(actually, it's gyration), it needs to be straightened or replaced. With bent shafts, rudders and props, a little goes a long way when it comes to making weird noises. You could have one blade with just a small bend and it'ss make all kinds of vibration. You'll need to use a dial indicator to check the shaft. The prop should be checked out fully, too.

rasmithaz
11-21-2004, 03:56 PM
I don't know if the vibration was there before I replaced the strut bearings because I never ran the boat before I bought it. I just took the boat home ( I live far from water ) and started working on it. When I put the prop shaft back in I guaged it at .005 and bolted it up. Maybe the engine shifted on me when I started it up. The prop looks good..no nicks, no evidence of damage or repair.

rasmithaz
11-21-2004, 04:09 PM
okay JimN that is what I' gonna do. The boat comes back apart and I will be looking for somebody to check out the prop and shaft. machine shop maybe?

JimN
11-21-2004, 07:04 PM
That's the kind of place I would take it. If you have a dial indicator (or can borrow one), you can check the tolerances, but machinists tend to be very picky about things like this, so call some and see if they work on boat parts. They may even check the shaft while it's still in the boat.

TCrate
11-21-2004, 08:22 PM
Make sure that you measure the alignment at the flange at the transmission. The boat needs to be in the water. flange bolts undone and using feeler gages at 45 degrees check the gap. There are some online instructions on this but I cannot recall what it is. Good Luck.

Thom

rasmithaz
11-21-2004, 10:12 PM
If anybody can refer me to a site that has instructions I sure would like to read them.

east tx skier
11-22-2004, 11:52 AM
rasmithaz, if you can't find a place locally that'll do this for you, BriEOD had a place in NC that he said did very good shaft work.

If it turns out not to be your shaft, my brother-in-law had a vibration issue (only at certain RPMs) that turned out to be the wax shaft packing. Very easy/cheap fix.

Wes
11-22-2004, 11:53 PM
I have a copy of the propshaft alignment instructions, but unable to upload it due to the size of the file. Email me at weslowenberg@shaw.ca and I will forward it to you. It worked great for me.

rasmithaz
11-23-2004, 07:10 PM
Thanks Wes. Does anybody know if the material the prop shaft is made of is called '303' ?

JimN
11-23-2004, 07:33 PM
I have never heard what the specific type of stainless is, but MC Technical dept should be able to tell you.

Thrall
11-23-2004, 10:56 PM
Hey ras,
How'd the boat run otherwise? Did you get any skiin' in? Would've liked to go to the lake, but the mtn's were beconing to me. The snow depth was killer for this time of year and we got 18" of new pow to ride on Sun morning. I was playin' in the water, just in it's gloroius other form.
Even if the prop looks good, I'd get it balanced first, that's cheap. And dial indicator the shaft. If it's straight and the cutlass bearing went in fine, probably misaligned at the trans. S/b a .002-.003 gap between the 2 flanges all the way around. I've heard it's a b!tch to adjust. You have to adj the threads on the motor mounts until the trans flange lines up w/ the shaft flange all the way around.
I'm not much for having the dlr do my work, but MC of AZ has been fair w/ me. Might consider them if you need an alignment. Talk to Donavan.

rasmithaz
11-24-2004, 12:25 AM
Hi Thrall.. water was perfect at canyon but the boat needs some bugs worked out. This boat is going to be nice when it's done. I'm going to have to go to PHX area for a machine shop and prop shop to look at shaft and prop before I go any further with boat. That water is nice...you should get on it.

Ric
11-24-2004, 11:07 AM
Thanks Wes. Does anybody know if the material the prop shaft is made of is called '303' ?
I really doubt the shaft is 303
maybe 316 or 17-4 more likely but am not exactly sure

rasmithaz
12-11-2004, 03:46 PM
I took the boat apart again and sent the prop shaft and prop to be looked at. It turns out the prop shaft was out .014 where it went through the hull. I have replaced the shaft. I had the prop balanced as well. The prop shaft when inserted through the strut ( with new bearings) does not go through the hole in the hull dead center. I can alighn the engine where the shaft sits even though it isn't centered in the hole. How do you test for a straight strut? I'm thinking about putting a big wrench on the strut and giving it a tug to try to alighn the shaft better but I'm a little concerned about breaking something. How important is dead center in the hull hole? Has anybody run across this?

JimN
12-11-2004, 08:51 PM
The strut won't bend easily unless you get it really hot, and this is obviously bad for the hull. Don't just go cranking on it. Loosen the strut and reposition it that way. Get it close and when you're done, you'll need to realign the motor/trans if you actually determine that it needs to be moved.

Worry more about the shaft coupler aligning to the transmission within tolerance than the strut not being centered in the hole. As long as the shaft doesn't tweak the strut when it's in place, you should be OK. If the strut needs moving, you'll be able to check that when the shaft coupler bolts have been tightened. The shaft should be centered in the cutlass bearings on the strut.

rasmithaz
12-12-2004, 12:22 PM
I'm glad I asked before I tugged on the strut. I understand that If I loosen the strut from the hull I will have enough play to rotate the strut to better alighn the prop shaft through the hole in the hull. The coupler alighnment is very close to dead on balls ( industry term) now. If the boat did not come from the factory with the prop shaft going through the dead center of the hole and it won't effect performance I'll bolt it up where it sits and not mess with the strut rotation and realighnment. It boils down to how important is the position of the prop shaft and the center of that hole.

JimN
12-12-2004, 02:20 PM
Actually, the industry term is 'dead nuts on'.

Did you or anyone else look at the bearings from the strut before they were removed? The wear would indicate which direction the strut was running through the strut.

The prop never lines up with the rudder, and the shaft can't generally go straight along the keel line since the motor is close to center. If the coupler mates well and is within tolerance (.005" max gap), you should be OK.

Did you keep the old shaft? You can have it straightened, too. That way, if the unthinkable happens, you have a spare.

Storm861triple
12-12-2004, 02:24 PM
IMO...

The Prop shaft postion (centering) in the log IS important. The shaft not being centered won't cause a vibration, but it absolutely WILL cause abnormal and excessive wear of the packing, as the shaft will essentially be "pushing against one side" of the ID of the packing.

I had this very issue when I first bought my '92 (same hull as yours). When I first bought the boat the prop shaft was pushing to the side of the packing so hard, it was litereally "sawing" through the bronze packing housing -the "adjusting nut"! I determined that my strut was bent slightly, and my prop shaft had excessive runout -by putting it in a lathe and using a dial indicator. I ended up buying:
*new prop shaft from SKIDIM,
*having the prop balanced
*new strut from Mastercraft.
*new cutlass bushings.

I installed the strut first, then slid the shaft through. The strut was such that the brand new propshaft actually HIT the ID of the log! Assuming the new strut was defective, I returned the strut and got another new strut from MC. Took it home and installed it...same thing.

There was no where near enough latitudinal "slop" in the bolts/holes to allow me to rotate the strut enough to get the shaft away from hitting the log...never mind getting it centered in the hole. I removed the strut, and used a die grinder to laterally oblong the strut mounting holes in the hull. I then installed the strut loosely and sent the prop shaft through. With a partner holding the prop shaft centered perfectly in the log, I tightened the strut bolts, and verified that the shaft was still perfectly centered. THEN, I proceeded to align the engine/trans to the newly, geometrically correct drive line. This results in less friction and wear of the goofy packing and you now KNOW that everything is stright, in-line, and properly centered. FYI, I also ditched that dumb, low-tech packing for a PSS seal. The drive system is so perfect now, you can turn the prop easily w/your pinky...something that was not even remotely possible when I first got it (took two hands!).

Soooo, IMO, I would START by doing what ever you have to do to get the propshaft centered in the log, THEN move your motor to accomidate that geometry. HTH.

JimN
12-12-2004, 02:53 PM
Centering in the log is important, but the hole in the hull isn't necessarily the indicator for whether it's close enough. If you had that hard of a time getting the shaft in, it was way off and the shaft should have looked like it was going through the strut on a pretty bad angle, looking at it from the side perpendicular to the way it was canted.

When the shaft goes back in, if it doesn't come close to the center, that's one thing, but nothing was said about it being that far off, unless I didn't pick that up when I read the original post. If you had a rod of the same diameter lined up to the coupler on the trans and it went through the stuffing box, it should be lined up with the strut without putting much pressure on the box in any direction. If the shaft is reinstalled, it should go through the strut up to the center of the coupler, and any movement should be more or less circular around that line.

That's it! Time for me to invent something!

rasmithaz
12-12-2004, 03:37 PM
JimN- 'Dead on balls' is a mixed metaphor combining 'balls to the wall' and 'dead nuts on'. I'm as confused as a walk in the park. Mixing things up is common when you reach my age. When I disassembled the boat the first time the bearings were worn out and the forward bearing had walked up the shaft. I destroyed the bearings getting them out and did not get a read on them. I could see that the engine was misalighned so I replaced the bearings and adjusted the alighnment. I put the boat on the water and had the vibration. Yes,I kept the original shaft.
Storm861triple- It sounds like you and I bought the same boat...in more ways than hull design. I have replaced bearings,prop shaft and prop. I trashed the old style packing gland that was in the same shape as the one you threw away. I have not replaced the strut. Did you just replace it to take it out of the equation or did you have reason to believe it was bent. I'm starting to think that my strut is probably good and it was misalighned from the beginning and that misalighnment screwed everything else up. Regardless...I've got to fix it.

JimN
12-12-2004, 05:57 PM
Maybe 'Dead on balls' means you got it 'Dead nuts on' at 'Balls to the wall' speed?

jimmer2880
12-13-2004, 07:56 AM
IMO...

With a partner holding the prop shaft centered perfectly in the log, I tightened the strut bolts, and verified that the shaft was still perfectly centered. THEN, I proceeded to align the engine/trans to the newly, geometrically correct drive line.
How did you determine if it was centered? Did you use the keel line & do some measuring, or just eye-ball it.

Is "dead nuts to the wall" now an approved phrase?

Storm861triple
12-13-2004, 03:50 PM
Storm861triple- ...I have not replaced the strut. Did you just replace it to take it out of the equation or did you have reason to believe it was bent.
I replaced my strut becasue I KNOW it was bent. You could clearly see that the tube part of the strut that the prop shaft goes through wasn't even close to parallel w/the hull. I took the strut off first, and bent it back straight in a hydraulic press. Happy w/my work, I re-installed it and the first outing bent it again. I guess it was fatugued. That is when I bought all new everything.

FYI, If we really DID buy the "same boat" (lol), I highly recommend that you remove your windshield, and re-install it w/SS hardware, through-bolted w/washers. Also, remove your drivers seat, fill the screw holes w/epoxy, and re-drill them and re-install the seat. Lastly, You're going to want to go ahead an remove that stupid "printed circuit board/resistor strip" fuel guage sending unit, and replace it w/a plain old rheostat/float type like every other boat has, and every car has had for like the last 70 years. Or you can wait for all that stuff to break and "learn" about those issues then, like I had to. Just a semi humorous "heads up" for you, from someone who has been all through this stuff.

Jimmer2880,
I just we just "eyeballed it". The centering of the shaft in the log is not SO critical that it needs to be measured, IMO, ie.. thousands of an inch, but you do want to get it as centered as possible and you can eyball that pretty good, using the log-hole as a guide. PLUS, there is enough slop in the cutlass bushings (even new) that up by the prop log, the prop shaft can be moved slightly up, down, left and right from where it wants to lie naturally in the cutlass bushings. My goal in mounting the strut, was to get the shaft as close to centered in the log as absolutly possible (+or- slop in the bushings), so that what ever type seal I chose to use, the seal would not have any side loading on it at all.

Then, like I said above, I spent a good hour or so, moving the engine/trans around to accomodate that new propshaft geometry, getting the engine/trans aligned to the propshaft...perfectly.

Laurel_Lake_Skier
12-13-2004, 05:49 PM
The drive system is so perfect now, you can turn the prop easily w/your pinky...something that was not even remotely possible when I first got it (took two hands!). HTH.
Just curious how easily propshafts turn for the rest of you. I can turn mine with one hand and a little effort.....far from turning easily with one finger! The boat seems fine and I've always figured that was the way the shaft should be.

Leroy
12-13-2004, 06:30 PM
Mine takes two hands and always has from when it was new in 2001. But this is normally done when dry, ie sitting out of water for several days.

Storm861triple
12-13-2004, 06:53 PM
Just curious how easily propshafts turn for the rest of you. I can turn mine with one hand and a little effort.....far from turning easily with one finger!
As I said above I can turn mine w/next to no effort. When It's dry as a bone, I can't turn it w/my pinky, but I can turn it w/one index finger pretty easily.


Folks, I am a FIRM believer that this is a good measure of your drive train alignment. Friction is not good. Ever. If you can get your drive train to spin as easily as I have (and you can), then you will see less heat, wear, and more power and fuel economy. I picked up a whopping 100 RPM after getting my stuff all straightened out. That's a lot of "free power" but like I said, mine originally took a STOUT effort w/two hands. I bet I was loosing 30 lb-ft through the drive train, and that's terrible.

Mine takes two hands and always has from when it was new in 2001....The boat seems fine and I've always figured that was the way the shaft should be
I have seen/heard this before and this has led to my conclusion that no, and I mean NO tourny inboard boats come from the factory properly aligned. I have not ever see one boat, new or otherwise, where the prop turned smoothly and freely (yes, I'm a nerd and I do check 'em at boat shows) as mine does. I have friends w/new(er) Malibu's('01), Natuiques('03), Gekko's('04) and Moomba's('03). I have aligned ALL of their drive trains and seen a HUGE improvement in parasitic loss. The owners were all amazed at the before and after difference.

OTOH, I have worked on a '77 Ski Nautique that has 750+ hours, and a bent strut and drive shaft. The owner refuses to spend money on a new strut and shaft, and continues to operate the boat, problem free mostly, every year. So a "stiff shaft" won't leave you stranded or anything like that, but again, friction is not ever a good thing in a drive system, and it is my belief that ALL these boats come equiped standard with too much of it. IMO the alignment they do at the factory(ies) is a "wham-bam-thank-you-m'am" deal...it's not THEIR boat. The alignment we are all capable of can be much better, just because I think we are all willing to spend the extra time to make it "dead nuts on" :D

One last note. I don't belive those of you w/"packing" are ever going to be able to turn your props EASILY w/one finger. That thing is a friction/heat generating machine.

Brn85ss
12-14-2004, 12:20 AM
I was wondering if the guys that took tours of the Mastercraft factory were able to see the rigging process.I would think the factoy would use a fast and accurate method.Some type of jig makes since to me,I can't see them using man power with a feeler gauge to align the shaft,strut and couplings.

JimN
12-14-2004, 01:02 AM
That's the way they do it, but they do so many it doesn't take much time. They can do it in their sleep. Then, after they do the test drive, they check whatever shows up as a problem.

Storm861triple
12-14-2004, 01:17 AM
That's the way they do it...

What's the way? The feeler guage? Jimn, w/all your experience, how many boats do you see w/ultra smooth turning drivelines right out of the factory?

sfitzgerald351
12-14-2004, 01:26 AM
This is an interesting thread. So those of us with the PSS (dripless packing box) should theoretically be able to turn our prop very easily. My question is whether this is with the shaft still hooked up to the transmission or unbolted at the coupler? My prop turns with one hand (still hooked to the tranny) fairly easily, but it certainly won't 'spin' if I give it a good push. I've always assumed this was mostly the drag from the transmission internals and the packing box. But it sounds like I might be able to do a little better.

Storm861triple
12-14-2004, 01:49 AM
This would definitely be with everything hooked up. The trans output flange should turn extremely easily offering hardly any resistance. In a properly aligned system with a PSS seal, nearly ALL the friction (what little there is) should come from the Cutlass bushings. When wet, like just after coming out of the water, it should "coast" after giving it a good spin w/your hand, IMO. Mine does. Dry, it won't do that.

An edit to an earlier post of mine. I was in my garage earlier this evening, and since this was fresh on my mind due to this thread, I went over and gave my prop a spin. I CAN in fact turn it w/my pinky, even dry. It's been in the garage since late September, and being in UT, that's about as DRY as you can get!

JimN
12-14-2004, 01:57 AM
I have seen a good number that were within tolerance right from the factory. I don't remember any that were way off but, like anything that's assembled by people, there will always be some that are. Dry bearings will definitely make it feel that there's something wrong, but once they're lubed somehow, they should spin freely. If it takes a few ft/lbs to get it to turn, it's not going to cause an appreciable loss of power, though.

jimmer2880
12-14-2004, 07:22 AM
This would definitely be with everything hooked up. The trans output flange should turn extremely easily offering hardly any resistance. In a properly aligned system with a PSS seal, nearly ALL the friction (what little there is) should come from the Cutlass bushings. When wet, like just after coming out of the water, it should "coast" after giving it a good spin w/your hand, IMO. Mine does. Dry, it won't do that.

An edit to an earlier post of mine. I was in my garage earlier this evening, and since this was fresh on my mind due to this thread, I went over and gave my prop a spin. I CAN in fact turn it w/my pinky, even dry. It's been in the garage since late September, and being in UT, that's about as DRY as you can get!
Ok - now I'm going to have to get out my torque wrench to see just how much force it takes me to turn mine. I have a PSS system & I think a properly aligned drivetrain. However, I'm rather sure it takes more than 1 or 2 fingers to turn it. I'll have to try to look at it this weekend.

rasmithaz
12-15-2004, 10:58 AM
My prop shaft alighnment isn't so bad that it hits the side of the log but it is down and to the right about an inch from center ( 4 o'clock) as you look at it from the engine to the rear of the boat. If I could tweak the strut to the left or right it wont help the up and down misalighnment. I would buy a new strut today if I knew that would remedy the problem. If I buy a new strut and bolt it up and it is still misalighned in the same position I am just wasting time and money. Any Ideas on strut straightment test? Quotation from the introduction portion of alighnment procedures offered earlier in this thread....." This procedure isn't always perfect from the factory. Many folks are unaware of this important adjustment, or simply neglect it."

JimN
12-15-2004, 12:03 PM
Does your dealer have a strut in stock? Look at your shaft and see if the centerline of the base lines up with the shaft. If you're close enough to the dealer, you could check one of theirs and see if it looks similar. Or look at several of their boats and see how many shafts are centered in the hole.

rasmithaz
12-15-2004, 12:37 PM
I live in the high sonoran desert far from water and mastercraft dealers. I deal long distance shipping with Rambo Marine ( who I highly recommend along with many other MC owners on this site). I have looked at the strut closely and it looks good to me but keep in mind I looked at my propshaft ( it was out .014 ) and my prop (unbalanced)and didn't see anything wrong with them. I am going to have to fly to Las Vegas over the New Years Eve weekend to look at boats at the local dealer there. Sacrifices have to be made if you are going to own a Mastercraft.

JimN
12-15-2004, 12:55 PM
Sorry, I didn't know you're that far from a dealer. If you end up removing the strut, it's pretty much a two person job (removing and reinstalling it) unless you can get a wrench to stay on the nut from above.

.014" isn't visible unless you're looking at the end wobble. If it was bent in the middle, it would be really hard to see.

Storm861triple
12-15-2004, 03:09 PM
Does your dealer have a strut in stock? Look at your shaft and see if the centerline of the base lines up with the shaft. If you're close enough to the dealer, you could check one of theirs and see if it looks similar. Or look at several of their boats and see how many shafts are centered in the hole.

I agree with the above. As for this part...

My prop shaft alighnment isn't so bad that it hits the side of the log but it is down and to the right about an inch from center ( 4 o'clock) as you look at it from the engine to the rear of the boat. If I could tweak the strut to the left or right it wont help the up and down misalighnment. I would buy a new strut today if I knew that would remedy the problem.
...Once you determing if your strut in bent or not,you can do one of the following:
1. If it's bent, obviously replace it, then try to install it straight.
2. If it isn't bent, you can shim the rear portion of it to essentially raise the shaft up in the log. OR you could sand grind the hull under the front to creat the same effect.

I doubt the strut is bent vertically, but I suppose it's possible.

It's good that you are analyzing your drive system the way you are, IMO. You said your shaft is "about an inch from center ( 4 o'clock) as you look at it from the engine to the rear of the boat". This is good info. You can see that you could move the engine to line up with that shaft the way it is, and your prop shaft alignment would be "correct" and you'd be "done". However, you would have the issue of PSS or packing side loading, which IMO, just isn't good.

Furthermore, if you have a packing system rather than a PSS, and you install the packing and THEN do the propshaft alignment, (as most folks would) the packing assy is so stiff, it would try to push the proshaft toward center of the prop log and probably be pretty successful at doing that. Now if you were to line up the system, you're lining it up w/the propshaft skewed off to one side in the cutlass bushings, creating friction and wear, at a minimum. Am I making sense here?

rasmithaz
12-15-2004, 04:26 PM
It all makes perfect sense to me. I just have to find out if the strut is good without ordering a new one just to find out the existing strut is fine. The vertical height in the log center could be a big deal. Dripless packing system is a must.

rasmithaz
04-04-2005, 02:48 PM
Well.... 3 months later...I have replaced the prop shaft, changed over to dripless packing.. alighned engine- transmission- couplers- shaft, brand new strut bearings and a freshly balanced prop. All of the vibration is gone but I still get the machine gun rat tat tat at WOT. What the heck am I going to do next? Something is hitting something (besides me hitting myself in the head trying to figure this out).

east tx skier
04-04-2005, 04:07 PM
I can't remember if someone brought this up already, but how are your engine mounts?

rasmithaz
04-04-2005, 06:58 PM
I can't remember if someone brought this up already, but how are your engine mounts?
Engine mounts look like they are new. The boat has 240 hrs and looks like it has been garaged. Everything looks good.

Storm861triple
04-04-2005, 11:45 PM
Do you get that noise if you throttle then engine to ~4000 RPM in nuetral? That would determine if it is an engine issue or drive. Follow that?

-Tom

lakes Rick
04-05-2005, 12:11 AM
Have you checked your V belt??? Sounds like it might be broken..

Foiler
04-05-2005, 12:43 AM
I also have a 93 205, last summer I had a banging-thumping noise coming from under the engine cover. When I would raise the cover it would stop, turns out it was the drain hose for the oil hitting the engine cover. Probably not your problem but if you have the same set up it's worth a look.

rasmithaz
04-05-2005, 01:12 AM
Do you get that noise if you throttle then engine to ~4000 RPM in nuetral? That would determine if it is an engine issue or drive. Follow that?

-Tom
I have brought the engine rpm to 4500 rpm in nuetral and it sounds great. This is a drive problem. I'm thinking the new prop shaft ( same as the old prop shaft) is gyrating at high rpm and hitting the bottom of the the log shaft because the prop shaft runs a little lower than dead center through the log shaft. I don't know if that is possible. I would guess that if everything was lined up the prop shaft would spin true without any gyration. Can anybody answer that question? If prop shafts do gyrate a little bit and I discover somehow that the shaft is hitting the bottom of the hole then a vertical adjustment has to be made with the strut to elevate the shaft in the hole or I make the hole bigger.

Storm861triple
04-06-2005, 02:23 PM
The prop shaft should run basically true, w/o any gyration. If it s "jump roping", you can see it w/dial indicator. If is is 'jump roping" as much as you're saying you might be able to see it.

It must be either REALLY close to the prop log, or you have a MAJOR problem, because the shaft shouldn't have more than a few throusands inch of lateral movement at MOST. If you are hitting the I.D. of the prop log, then if you pull your packing off the prop log, then you should be able to see some wear/rubbing there, both on the shaft and on the I.D. of the aluminum prop log.

If you do discover that this is where the noise is coming from IMO, you need to move the strut to get the shaft centered in the log, then re-align your engine to the new propshaft trans flange location.

Can you hook up a fake-a-lake and run it at 4500 RPM in gear in your driveway? (wet the cutlass bushing first) If so, you could pull your packing and watch the staft inside the log as it spins at 4500 RPM, as well as listen around to see where the noise is coming from.

-Tom

rasmithaz
04-09-2005, 01:44 PM
The propshaft is not extremely close to the logshaft. There are wear spots on the ID of the logshaft at the front/bottom and on the prop shaft. The prop shaft has been replaced and I thought that would take care of the problem. Spinning that prop and propshaft @ 4500RPM in the driveway with a hose on the strut bearings would be a lttle scary and I'm not sure you can keep the bearings wet enough. Next step is to take out engine cowling and rear floor and do my best to listen while going down lake at WOT.

mbeach
04-09-2005, 03:01 PM
rasmithaz,
If it turns out not to be your shaft, my brother-in-law had a vibration issue (only at certain RPMs) that turned out to be the wax shaft packing. Very easy/cheap fix.


east tx -

i have a question for you. when i removed my prop, had to apply lots of heat and noticed liquid dripping from the shaft bracket near prop. i guessed that it was water left over from previous season. after reading you post, however, sounds like it could have been the wax packing. in any case, how is it replaced and where can i get it. would like to do it before i remount prop.

Storm861triple
04-10-2005, 02:38 PM
The propshaft is not extremely close to the logshaft. There are wear spots on the ID of the logshaft at the front/bottom and on the prop shaft. The prop shaft has been replaced and I thought that would take care of the problem. Spinning that prop and propshaft @ 4500RPM in the driveway with a hose on the strut bearings would be a lttle scary and I'm not sure you can keep the bearings wet enough. Next step is to take out engine cowling and rear floor and do my best to listen while going down lake at WOT.

Well if you have marks on the ID of the pro log and on the shaft, you definitely have some issues there.

I wasn't recommending that you hold a hose on the cutlass bearings as you run it in the driveway, I meant, wet everything, THEN run it for a minute or less at the required RPM. It'll be fine for a minute. But removing the motor cover and rear floor, and going out on the lake is a better idea, assuming you can get smooth water, and a smoot driver. :)

-Tom