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rem_p
11-08-2004, 08:07 PM
well the mc is my first boat and i have no clue about what to do to get it ready for winter....it hasnt been in the water since the week after labor day, and last week the temps were up in the 80s....so i think most of the water is evaporated since it was last used...anyway any suggestions would be greatly appreciated

JimN
11-08-2004, 09:31 PM
Do a search here for the steps to winterize it. The water won't evaporate from inside the motor, if that's what you were referring to. When you do the search, look for some posts from the past two months, a list was posted by mymc for the newer motors, but you would follow that list, unless you have the LT-1. You don't, but using the RV anti-freeze is at your option.

dmac
11-08-2004, 10:05 PM
well the mc is my first boat and i have no clue about what to do to get it ready for winter....it hasnt been in the water since the week after labor day, and last week the temps were up in the 80s....so i think most of the water is evaporated since it was last used...anyway any suggestions would be greatly appreciated
This is the first experience I have had with winterization also. My last boat was garage kept and it was never really an issue.

I have a mechanic who is handling it as The boat will stay on the lift for the winter. He is going to change the oil and filter, change the transmission fluid, drain the water from the engine and replace with anti-freeze, condition the fuel. From what I recall this is consistent with the owners manual although I have thought to re-read that part.

I hate winter, it was a beautiful weekend over here as well. The lake level started going down on 11/1 and that was it for me. Not enough water in the slip to float the boat. :(

east tx skier
11-09-2004, 10:46 AM
Last week, I compiled a winterization checklist, a dewinterization checklist, and a winterization supply list to help me, my brother-in-law, and my father-in-law through the process. By and large, it seems pretty universal. I made it using a relatively old JimN post, which I cross referenced with my manual and the procedures outlined on aquaskier.com.

When I ask my mechanic to winterize, he pretty much does what dmac's guy does, plus fogging. Anything extra, like check the fuel filter, service the starter, etc., he'll do, but I'd have to ask him. While the basics will certainly keep your block from freezing, it's not the anal-retentive, low drag, attention to detail stuff that will put the odds in your favor for a spic-and-span, runs like a top boat ten years down the line. Then again, maybe it will, who knows.

JimN
11-09-2004, 12:23 PM
Doug- do you know a lot of skiers who would want to chip in for the supplies to winterize, summerize and run their boats on the trailer? If you do, you can go to a feed supply store and get a plastic watering tank that fits under the flaps and a piece of hose that fits onto the raw water pump inlet, hanging into the tank so you can actually rev it higher than a Fake-a Lake or just a garden hose would let you. You also don't waste as much water or antifreeze this way. I had a piece of a conveyor belt to block the spray from the exhaust so it would go back into the tank. It works for inboards, outboards and sterndrives. When we winterized the boats, the tank was almost full of antifreeze so we would run it up to temperature with only antifreeze, never added water except what was already in the motor. Then we used a refractometer to see the burst temperature and added more juice when it was needed. If you guys buy one barrel, it would last a couple of years, especially if you drain the blocks before winterization and use oil booms to absorb oily substances in the tank.

If you all want to buy the fluids in bulk, it saves money, too. I know this was discussed a couple of years ago and there didn't seem to be much interest, but thought I would bring it up again.

east tx skier
11-09-2004, 02:09 PM
Jim, I think it's a good idea, but my relatives with ski boats are a bit spread out to make it work. I'm probably not going to use antifreeze this time around simply because (1) it's Texas and the boat is garaged, (2) there's already a little bit of rust on the inside of the block and manifolds and I don't see how antifreeze is going to lessen/improve this (figure if I drain it and run it around on the trailer over a few hills, whatever water's in there will eventually evaporate), and (3) I haven't built something to catch the antifreeze like you describe). Incidintally, I don't use a straight hose hook-up or fake a lake, but a different device I designed, and which I'm currently mulling with a patent attorney friend of mine. It basically overcomes what I see as the shortcomings of the two currently widely used devices.

So, I think the big tank is a great way to do it, if you've got a big tank and a bunch of folks nearby that will go in on it with you. Unfortunately, I just don't have that at the moment.

Quick question, since you mentioned reving it higher when using the tank, what do you do to lubricate the shaft, or are you talking about reving it in neutral. Sometimes, I get a little shaft movement when I haven't run the boat for a while. So long as it doesn't last long, I haven't worried about it.

stevo137
11-14-2004, 11:13 AM
Gents,
As I mentioned before, I have always used my MC dealer to winterize and have never had any problems.
They not only winterize but change the fluids as well.
This year with winterizing, oil and trans fluid change it was $197 total.
They also check for things that might need attention.
Just at this location, they do about 300 boats per season and in the spring they said that they get 2-3 boats that come in for repair with cracked blocks from people that tried to winterize themselves.
I also like the idea of having all of the service records if I ever sell the boat.
Even if I were more mechanically inclined, for $197 bucks, I would still have them do it.

dmac
11-14-2004, 06:00 PM
I hate to sound naive but since I am not personally mechanically inclined, I'll ask. What is fogging?

André
11-14-2004, 06:17 PM
Spraying some "special lubricant" in the carbutator,throttle body of an EFI or (Not sure on this one) behind the air filter of an Multi Port EFI.
You do that until the engine stall or run really rough,then shut it down for winter.

sfitzgerald351
11-14-2004, 06:22 PM
The fogging oil sticks and coats the cynlinder walls and intake so that rust doesn't form on the inside while the motor sits.

Leroy
11-14-2004, 06:56 PM
Reading the instructions on my Gold Eagle Fogging Oil, it says for engines with 3 or more cylinders to take the spark plugs out, spray 3 seconds into the hole with the plastic tube, turn over the engine by hand several times and replace the spark plugs. Instructions on the internet are a little different.

http://www.goldeagle.com/sta-bil/faqs_stabil.asp

JimN
11-14-2004, 09:54 PM
FYI- don't ever use WD-40 for fogging. It's way too thin and has cutting oil in it. The fogging oil is supposed to coat the metal parts and stay there. One reason to spray it into the intake is so the valves and seats get some protection.

dmac
11-15-2004, 09:08 AM
Knowledge is power. Thanks gents, I am calling my mechanic to ensure that fogging was part of his protocol.

east tx skier
11-15-2004, 11:12 AM
My MC dealer (where I bought the boat) sent me a flyer, which got there the day after I winterized myself.

For $110, they would (1) add fuel stabilizer, (2) flush the boat, (3) fog the engine, and (4) drain everything.

I had my local non-MC dealer (I don't have a local MC dealer) winterize for me last year as I had concerns similar to what Steve has expressed. They changed the fluids and added antifreeze in addition to the above steps and it ran me $180.

Having done it both ways, I can now say, when you do it yourself, more gets done. With the $100 I saved (after supplies, I'm getting a new intake manifold).

Tgchrist
11-15-2004, 09:54 PM
It takes a little more time but when I winterize I do the following:
Get the engine hot. Drain, fill with RV antifreeze, drain.(Drain the manifolds, muffler, block and hose to pump).
Spray fogging oil while filling with antifreeze
Blow out the heater and shower.
Pull the impeller
Loosen up the belt
spray the motor and shaft with CRC.
Fog cylinders by pulling plugs.
Drain and refill tranny every other year.
Clean and wax the boat.
Vacuum.
Clean and oil the platform.
Put away for the winter.

I figure pulling the impeller and plugs is worth it once a year. If there is a problem with either it is easier changing now than mid ski season after a problem occurs.

I change the water/fuel filter every other year as well.

I store in a barn so I also tape the exhaust flap shut to keep critters out.

Good Luck.

jimmer2880
11-16-2004, 06:05 AM
It takes a little more time but when I winterize I do the following:
Get the engine hot. Drain, fill with RV antifreeze, drain.(Drain the manifolds, muffler, block and hose to pump).
Spray fogging oil while filling with antifreeze
Blow out the heater and shower.
Pull the impeller
Loosen up the belt
spray the motor and shaft with CRC.
Fog cylinders by pulling plugs.
Drain and refill tranny every other year.
Clean and wax the boat.
Vacuum.
Clean and oil the platform.
Put away for the winter.

I figure pulling the impeller and plugs is worth it once a year. If there is a problem with either it is easier changing now than mid ski season after a problem occurs.

I change the water/fuel filter every other year as well.

I store in a barn so I also tape the exhaust flap shut to keep critters out.

Good Luck.
Don't forget about draining your raw water filter if you have one. Also, drain your tranny-oil cooler. You should also blow-out your speedo-lines. I have seen water get into the ballast tubes (I know it should have never gotten that far, but occasionally it does. I've seen it more than a couple times).

Be sure to block your engine-box open 3-4 inches or so to allow for ventilation.

east tx skier
11-16-2004, 10:33 AM
TG, don't forget to change your oil. There's been lots of discussions on here about it not being so very good to leave old oil in there over the winter.

By the way, what's "CRC"?

JimN
11-16-2004, 11:07 AM
CRC is a brandname for chemicals, lubes, etc. red and white cans, black lettering, sold at most car parts stores.

east tx skier
11-16-2004, 12:09 PM
So would this be a anit-corrosion metal protectant?

JimN
11-16-2004, 03:02 PM
I think they make that, too. Cleaners, lubes, etc. I'm pretty sure NAPA sells their products and may have a catalog. It's good stuff.

dmac
11-17-2004, 05:19 PM
Winterization completed, fogging was done. Next task is to take out the seat coushions wipe down the interior, vacuum and take the teak in for oiling.

Texan
11-26-2004, 02:07 PM
How important is it to make sure your fuel tank is completely full ? I ran fuel conditioner through the system and left mine with about 3/4 tank. It will sit for about four months before I put it back in the water.

JimN
11-26-2004, 02:16 PM
Moisture in air condenses when the air is warmer than the surfaces/substances it comes into contact with. If there is a lot of air, there's more water to condense and get into the gas, This happens every time the air gets warm and the gas stays colder. If there's not much air in the tank, there will be less moisture getting into the gas. If you want to add the correct ratio of stabilizer to the amount of gas it takes to top it off, you'll be fine.