PDA

View Full Version : Is every 50 hrs enough?


vegashomeexpert
07-24-2006, 11:43 AM
Changes my oil last night at 52 hrs. Came out black as coal. Is changing every 50 hrs enough?

kdtechnologyinc
07-24-2006, 12:13 PM
We change our oil about every 10-20 hours and try not to let it get too black. I don't think 'coal' black is a big problem though, but that's a case where I would 'double' change the oil by running a fresh oil change for an hour and then change it again. That being said, I'm anal about our MC maintenance and probably at the extreme. I am curious what other owners think and their change intervals. Some would argue the economics that are involved, but that goes in one ear and out the other. Nothing's too good for our baby! BTW, we use Mobil 1 synthetic and I'm sure many would say thaz crazy talk only needs to be changed every century or so...
:)

LakePirate
07-24-2006, 12:18 PM
If you want to ship me that 10 hour Mobil 1 after you change it, I will be more than happy to put the other 40 hours on it. :D

G-man
07-24-2006, 12:19 PM
I changed every 50 hours or in fall before storing in the winter. It is not recommended to leave dirty oil in the engine over the winter. Mobil 1 is great stuff but I wouldn't consider putting in a marine engine unless there was about 100 hours on the engine. Most marine engine manufactures don't recommend the use of syntheic oil

Hoff1
07-24-2006, 12:52 PM
my oil always seems to be fairly black after 50 hours as well.

kdtechnologyinc
07-24-2006, 01:07 PM
We went through an oil testing session in the early 80's when my wife worked at Bell Labs. She had the absolute coolest toys! The coal black color you described is in fact mostly carbon from the combustion process. That's not a big problem until it starts to turn gray or silvery in color which is metal particulates. What we found was lubricity drops exponentially with the binding of combusted carbon molecules and suspension of particulates. The curve varies not only by use, but also by age, suggesting the hydro-carbon chain disassociates as it sits not being used. Synthetics were new to us at the time and this is where they really showed a difference. After a few heat cycles, oils become less stable. The more heat cycles, the less 'shelf life' in the engine block. Every time I saw metals in the oil samples, I cringed. What I learned is this: There is no hourly or mileage meter for oil change intervals at first; we change oil by color which is our best indicator of where it stands in the curve. Yes, we throw out oil that still has some useful life left. No matter what, don't use oil that looks gray or silver!
Now I'm gonna go change engine oil AND tranny fluid. (I love working on our Mastercraft!)

LakePirate
07-24-2006, 01:16 PM
Quick question, what exactly does Bell Labs have to do with oil? My Grandfather worked for them years ago and they made all kinds of cool stuff but it was all phone or electronics related. He was busy building pay phones that wouldn't give money back to users and cable that would stand up to the elements. Ever heard of Ickypic?
He was on the team that designed that.

kdtechnologyinc
07-24-2006, 01:32 PM
Excellent question!
She worked in the failure analysis lab.
The Stereo and Scanning Electron Microscopes, Gas Chromatigraph and Temperature-Humidity Chamber were used for testing, among others. This is the same building where the first operating solid state device was designed. The transistor. Bell ain't jus phones.

LakePirate
07-24-2006, 01:35 PM
Excellent question!
She worked in the failure analysis lab.
The Stereo and Scanning Electron Microscopes, Gas Chromatigraph and Temperature-Humidity Chamber were used for testing, among others. This is the same building where the first operating solid state device was designed. The transistor. Bell ain't jus phones.

No doubt it ain't just phones. At my grandfathers office they built the "thing" It was a box that when cut off it would store enough energy for a mechanical hand to come out and turn the switch back on.

They recently tore down the old Western Electric/bell labs building here in Atlanta to build townhomes. It was a sad day as all sorts of cool things were invented and built in that building.

VTJC
07-24-2006, 01:36 PM
Have an oil analysis performed on your oil after 50 hours, to know for sure. The report will tell you the amount of contamination, type and lubricating capabilities left in the oil. I did it when I switched to 10k oil changes in my VW TDI. My hunch with syntheticís you can go allot longer than 50hrs. I change mine annual which can be 40-70 hrs.

Color can be a guide but not definitive. For example the oil in diesels quickly blackens from the soot the engine dumps into the oil, but the proper oil will lubricate fine for many miles.

Jamie

ted shred
07-24-2006, 07:19 PM
VTJC is right . The only way to know for sure is have it analized at 50 hrs. If your use a quality synthetic oil this should be no problem. The color of the oil has little to do with how it is performing. Some turn dark from the additives reacting to heat. A quality oil also contains detergents to clean the engine, it also will keep these contamenants in suspension to be picked up by the filter.Some of these particles will remain, as they are to small to get caught in the filter. Some of these contribute to the dark color. Use a good filter like Wix,K&N, Amsoil to keep it as clean as possible.

Hoosier Bob
07-24-2006, 08:34 PM
I obviously run synthetic is everything including my mower! My 93 was delivered with it as well are many GM engines. That being said Indmar recommends after 100 hours of dino juice break in synthetic can be used.
http://www.indmar.com/support/faq_detail.cfm?id=7

Dirty oil is usually a dirty environment. I would clean everything around the engine, bilge, air cleaner/spark arrester, check PCV(older engine blowby?), carb or fuel mixture and perform a few quick short hour oil changes. I have seen boats with 800-900 hours and perfectly clean oil on the stick. Oil changes are about as cheap as marine upkeep gets!:D