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View Full Version : Driving instruction video for wife


h2oskier
07-21-2006, 10:49 PM
My wife is nw to boat driving and I have been impressed with her so far. She however takes any comments I have personally and gets mad/frustrated with me. I am a fairly decent slalom skier, so every time I go out I try to work on things with my form etc... What I am looking for is some instruction that does not come from me. In the form of DVD or articles. I want her to have a good time on the water with me and I also want a good set.

Thanks in advance.

trickskier
07-21-2006, 11:01 PM
My wife is nw to boat driving and I have been impressed with her so far. She however takes any comments I have personally and gets mad/frustrated with me. I am a fairly decent slalom skier, so every time I go out I try to work on things with my form etc... What I am looking for is some instruction that does not come from me. In the form of DVD or articles. I want her to have a good time on the water with me and I also want a good set.

Thanks in advance.


Hey H2o,

I met my wife 22 years ago on the water. She's as good a driver as you would want. However, it took some time before she was able to feel confident. At one point I trusted her to drive the boat and pull the trick release.......NOW THAT's TRUST!!!!! Tell your wife GOOD PULL after every run and give her tips on how to improve.......NEVER be discouraging.....I am sure there are some video's. I would start with WaterSki USA

Farmer Ted
07-22-2006, 12:18 AM
My wife is nw to boat driving and I have been impressed with her so far. She however takes any comments I have personally and gets mad/frustrated with me. I am a fairly decent slalom skier, so every time I go out I try to work on things with my form etc... What I am looking for is some instruction that does not come from me. In the form of DVD or articles. I want her to have a good time on the water with me and I also want a good set.

Thanks in advance.


It would probably be better recieved if you highlighted something she did/does wrong with out coming right out and telling her....have her sit next to you while you pull someone and explain what you're doing and why (highlighting what she did wrong without saying, here's what you did wrong)

the easiest way to train someone is to explain how to do the task, demonstrate the task, have them do a show and tell as perform the task (works in the Air Force)

or you could find a woman who knows how to drive and have your wife pal around with her (positive peer pressure?)

betsy&david Harrison
07-22-2006, 02:18 AM
I may have had a few tonight but... from a woman's perspective...


One, we take your tone of voice very differently than what you may mean.
Two, have patience, she will get it, she is an intelligent person too.


I almost put our brand new 93 MC up the back of another boat because I didn't understand how a boat opperated. Never had been exposed to one in my live before. Now, I can do anything I want with a boat. I am very confident doing anything I am asked or needed to do with it.

Suggestion, take her out into the middle of the lake, just the two of you and let her figure out how to use the throttle both hard and gentle. Let her know how to manuver the boat with the steering wheel when parking or docking. She doesn't need a video, just time behind the wheel to get a feel for it.

When you are telling her a suggestion she just may have to bite the bullet and say to herself "I am learning and I need to Know how to do this" and listen without getting upset. We don't come into this world knowing how to opperate things... B:D

h2oskier
07-22-2006, 04:32 AM
Thanks for the suggestions, My wife has done a great job since she has started. Don't get me wrong, She is new to boats and I know that she has done well over the last few seasons. I will try some different tactics with my delivery of instructios.
She pulls me slalom, tricks, wakeboard, kneeboard, barefooting, and on the tube. She even docks it and drives it on the trailer.

TMCNo1
07-22-2006, 08:47 AM
Easy on the criticism and heavy on the compliments, then it won't be long before she starts telling you what she thinks she did wrong and asking you for advise, making it easier on both of you.

Farmer Ted
07-22-2006, 09:30 AM
Thanks for the suggestions, My wife has done a great job since she has started. Don't get me wrong, She is new to boats and I know that she has done well over the last few seasons. I will try some different tactics with my delivery of instructios.
She pulls me slalom, tricks, wakeboard, kneeboard, barefooting, and on the tube. She even docks it and drives it on the trailer.



uh, what's the problem?

bigmac
07-22-2006, 09:41 AM
My wife is an excellent boat driver/docker/loader, and is probably better at managing trailers than I am. My only issue with her driving over the years has been speed managment - problematic for hydrofoiling especially. Not her fault, exactly, as consistent throttle management was much harder with our I/O. That relatively small problem completely disappeared with Perfect Pass (WakeBoard Pro) on a MasterCraft. From a standpoint of pulling, PP is the greatest marriage-saver ever invented.

skisix@38
07-22-2006, 09:42 AM
From experience this is aq long and difficult endeavor, good luck.
I agee that instruction coming directly from will probably come at a high price and will lead to her being frustration, etc.... This is a necessary thing to happen but, also have her ride in the boat while someone good is at the wheel and have that person just explain to you what they are doing and hope that she is listening too. She'll get it and that way it's not coming from you. If you have any other female drivers you might have her ride along with them too.

east tx skier
07-22-2006, 02:37 PM
This is all so true. It's worthwhile though. The first time I signaled to my wife that I was done and she put the nose a little to the left as I pulled out, dropped the throttle and brought it back around to me I thought I was going to tear up. She is always my driver of choice. More recently, she's been getting used to doing more course driving.

Emphasize the good and don't try to correct everthing at once. Maybe wait until you are back behind the wheel and say, "hey, let me show you something cool." Don't even mention that she may have not done it perfectly.

As for some sort of external material, there are some good tips here (http://www.schnitzskis.com/skitips/boatdriving.html).

Tennesseeski
07-22-2006, 03:48 PM
That link does have some good tips eastie, thanks. Here is one part that shocked me(not a driving tip and a bit outdated with the price of new boat and gas, but makes you think)

A new ski boat can cost $40,000.00. A 10% loan on that amount would end up costing the owner roughly $400.00 a month or $4,800.00 per year. The depreciation on this boat will run at least $5,000.00 to $10,000.00 per year the first few years. The insurance on this boat costs about $500.00 per year. Storage can run $1,000.00 per year. Add to this oil changes $50.00, cleaning materials $100.00, maintenance $1,000.00, ropes and handles $250.00, permits and registrations $200.00, additional auto insurance $200.00, additional auto expenses $2,400.00, AWSA membership $50.00, miscellaneous expenses $500.00 and you have $21,050.00 per year cost to ski not including gas and the cost of new skis and equipment! If some-one skis 2 sets a day (a lot of days I ski 1 set), 5 days a week, March through August and an average of 4 sets a week thereafter, they will have a total of 364 sets. Add in a spouse that skis the same amount and you now have 728 total sets. Letís use $1.50 per gallon of gas times 1.5 gallons per set times 728 sets and we get $1,638.00. Now letís divide the cost of owning the boat for the year $21,050.00 by the 728 sets and you have $31.16 per set. If we take a look at the folks up north who ski 4-6 months per year, this figure doubles or triples! So the next time you head for the lake with your ski buddyís boat, keep these figures in mind.

kycat2007
07-22-2006, 11:11 PM
I have read this type of thread a couple of times. It is truly amazing how many of you guys say your wifes never drive or can't help back the trailer in. I am quite impressed that many of you have either taught your wifes to do it and they are willing. I have also seen some of the women stand up for themselves as well.

I have to give a friend of mine some acclaids. She amazes me because she can do it all. She has experienced it all as well. She said she has had boats come off the ball, flats, etc. She takes them all in stride. She drove the Mastercraft this past weekend and I felt as comfortable as could be. She can slalom and knows her boats. I think she may be perfect. She jumped up and backed the trailer like a pro.

Not sure where it will go but I like what I am seeing so far.

east tx skier
07-24-2006, 12:13 PM
My wife learned to be a great trailer backer. All I had to tell her was "put your hand on the bottom of the wheel. If you want the boat to go left, move your hand left (and vice-versa). She can really thread the needle when there are lots of walleys on the ramp.

LakePirate
07-24-2006, 12:18 PM
My wife learned to be a great trailer backer. All I had to tell her was "put your hand on the bottom of the wheel. If you want the boat to go left, move your hand left (and vice-versa). She can really thread the needle when there are lots of walleys on the ramp.


That is a pretty good tip there Eastie.

I have been having a hard time telling people how to back trailers of late, seems like it is one of those things that I can do and not think about, but can't tell you how to do it. When I was about 10 or so they put me in the middle of a corn field with a farm truck and a short tongued trailer and said have at it.

ntidsl
07-24-2006, 12:20 PM
http://www.schnitzskis.com/skitips/boatdriving.html