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GILLWHOPPER
07-21-2006, 04:12 AM
Can we put our "Non-Satwater" boats in saltwater or not? I bought my boat new off the showroom floor in 1995 and knew nothing of a saltwater specific Master Craft until weeks after my purchase and since then I have heard owners tell me that they put there (Non-Satwater) boat in the ocean with no probelms and others say "dont do it". I'd like to take mine to the Gulf if it would'nt hurt it. Anybody know the facts on this?
What do saltwater model's have that the others do not? Will a good flushing-out with tap water prevent any potential damage?

peason
07-21-2006, 09:16 AM
Gill- there has been other threads on this forum addressing this subject - I suggest doing a search. Form what I have read - the biggest problem you may have is with the trailer - not being able to completely flush all of the salt out of the trailer can lead to pre-mature rust. Most trailers designed for salt water are galvanized. I believe there are some products out there that can help flush the cooling system.

NatesGr8
07-21-2006, 09:19 AM
run mine in salt about 50 percent of the time. 0 issues so far, just make sure you wash the boat down after each use and flush it for 15 to 20 minutes. I do this religiously to avoid any issues. i also wash and spray down the trailer as much as possible to prevent corrosion.

rektek
07-21-2006, 11:58 PM
Gillwhopper,
salt water is fine but the proper maintenance is very high and I think it would hurt resell value severely. I live next to a salt water bay and the water is glass most days, I'm thinking of buying a beater boat for this purpose but I wouldn't dare take our Maristar out there. once salt water corrosion begins it never stops, you can only slow it down.

cheers

Jeff

afkvrts
07-24-2006, 03:57 PM
I take my '94 225vrs out in the sf bay area waters and have not had any issues. I do flush out the motor for about 15 min after each salt water trip. I also hose down the trailer but have noticed a little rust on the undersides. I use mine.

DuaneS
07-24-2006, 05:39 PM
I also have used my 98 200 VRS in the Gulf Coast Bay area for 6 years. The steel trailer just died a very painful death this last May. Replaced it with a Aluminum tantum for about 3k. Works great. Use the boat in salt only if you intend on spending hours cleaning after use. FYI, the steel trailer eats itself from the inside out. If you are seeing surface damage on the trailer, chances are the inside is much worse. (My trailer jack attach point completely broke).

Ric
07-24-2006, 05:43 PM
I also have used my 98 200 VRS in the Gulf Coast Bay area for 6 years. The steel trailer just died a very painful death this last May. Replaced it with a Aluminum tantum for about 3k. Works great. Use the boat in salt only if you intend on spending hours cleaning after use. FYI, the steel trailer eats itself from the inside out. If you are seeing surface damage on the trailer, chances are the inside is much worse. (My trailer jack attach point completely broke). whooo let me second this last statement about rusty trailers.. I had one that was about 10ys old that showed some rust so I took it to the local sandblast shop to get the once-over and repaint... he called up wondering how in the hell I ever got to and from the lake with that trailer? we had to weld in some new sections which killed my budget on the repair(might have just as well gone with a new aluminum trailer from the start!)

erkoehler
07-24-2006, 05:55 PM
You might as well upgrade to a salt water series boat if you are really serious about doing the salt gig.

If you factor in the amount your going to loose on resale, maintenance expenses because the boat isn't setup for saltwater use, and factor in your time for the whole cleaning/maintaining aspect of the whole process, it is definetly CHEAPER to just upgrade to a new boat.

Ric
07-24-2006, 05:58 PM
Are you saying I coulda got more for my 190 if I'd never run it in salt water?

erkoehler
07-24-2006, 05:59 PM
pretty much:rolleyes:

Ric
07-24-2006, 06:00 PM
I really missed the boat on that one... purdiest 4yr old 190 you ever saw too!

Ryan
07-24-2006, 09:57 PM
You might as well upgrade to a salt water series boat if you are really serious about doing the salt gig.

If you factor in the amount your going to loose on resale, maintenance expenses because the boat isn't setup for saltwater use, and factor in your time for the whole cleaning/maintaining aspect of the whole process, it is definetly CHEAPER to just upgrade to a new boat.

Hey Erk, first statement is true ;) Yes, if you're going to buy new, it's definitely cheaper to pony up for the SS options.

GILLWHOPPER, SS differences are waterproof electrical connections, a half closed cooling system on a Cruisaider engine, and an external flush mount. If you're just looking to cruise around, you could find a used outboard boat for what it will cost to convert your boat for full salt water use.

I take good care of my salty boat, but, if I were to treat my boat as disposable I'd still come out better buying a used 190 every 4 years than buying a new SS boat. I treat my boat like it's in acid, never let it sit, ski and get out mentality -flush and wash asap. The only thing I have on my boat for salt use is a Perko Flush Pro and my engine is looking pretty darn good. Thankfully MC used Stainless hardware when my boat was made.


My advice is this:

SALT ONCE IN A WHILE
Flush and wash the boat with Salt-a-way (or similar) much better than just fresh water.
Stick the hose in the three openings on your trailer on level ground to flush it out from the inside, and spray down the outside.
If you still want your brakes to work you should pull the adjustment tab off and flush the brakes too, then of course put the tab back in.


FREEQUENTLY TO ALL THE TIME
Install a heat exchanger for your engine and leave your exhaust on raw water cooling ~$625. Or go for a full system for ~$1000.
Sell your trailer while it looks good and get a galvanized trailer ~$2k-3.5k (that's the one I wish I would have done). And only with disk brakes and Stainless brakelines.
You're set to enjoy your time on the water free of the stress from wondering how much iron just coroded off your block while the kids swam.

Ryan
07-24-2006, 10:08 PM
Oh, I do have galvanized wheels in addition the the Flush Pro.
If you've got chrome wheels, they'll get ugly really fast.

shepherd
07-24-2006, 10:47 PM
I've only used my boat a couple times in salt water, and flushed the boat and trailer thoroughly. Here's what my trailer looks like now. It's a 1990, so it was pretty beat to begin with, but the rust really started showing up after the salt water uses. (and the scratches on the trailer under the rudder should be a good warning about power-loading the trailer :( )

afkvrts
07-25-2006, 02:24 PM
In my opinion the thing that will change with getting a salt water series boat is the closed cooling so now you dont have to flush the system, and maybe a different trailer which holds up a little better. ALL of the other cleaning is a MUST, I've fished off of boats which were made specificlly for off-shore fishing and let me tell you. You still have to get the salt water off ALLl your stuff and gear, it kills everything.

My trailer is also dying a slow death... :( But im using the boat to my liking.

-A

Ryan
07-25-2006, 03:59 PM
In my opinion the thing that will change with getting a salt water series boat is the closed cooling so now you dont have to flush the system, and maybe a different trailer which holds up a little better. ALL of the other cleaning is a MUST, I've fished off of boats which were made specificlly for off-shore fishing and let me tell you. You still have to get the salt water off ALLl your stuff and gear, it kills everything.

My trailer is also dying a slow death... :( But im using the boat to my liking.

-A

You still need to flush the system whether it has an open system (all gets flushed), 1/2 closed (heat exchanger and exhaust is flushed) or full closed cooling system (heat exchanger is flushed).

afkvrts
07-25-2006, 09:10 PM
I thought full closed cooling would not get any saltwater in it. Thanks for correcting me. :) BTW : I've been working on pulling my flexplate/damperplate and have made a little progress. I'll post the pics in that thread and give the details.

-A

jakethebt
07-26-2006, 08:38 AM
The MC salt water boats also have sacrificial zinc anodes on them to protect the rudder and other underwater metal hardware. I am not sure of all the locations, but the 2006 MC brochure shows some of them. These anodes are designed to corrode first and keep the vital parts in better shape (hence the sacrificial in the name). You can buy these at boat stores and could possibly retro fit them I you really wanted. Since these are sacrificial, they corrode themselves away and are designed to be replaceable. Most have a screw in the middle that attach directly to the metal part that you want to protect.

In addition to flushing the engine, you also want to get the salt water out of the inside of the boat too. Anywhere that the salt water contacts the metal parts such as the bilge pump and anything in the bilge… Use the boat how you want, but the long term effects will not be seen for… well a long time.

Ask for opinions and that is what you get… I have been shopping around for a used 209 or X9 and would not consider a boat that has been in salt water. As someone already said on this thread, once the corrosion starts, there is no stopping it. If I were faced with your question, I would sell the fresh water and look for a (used?) Salt Water...

Ryan
07-26-2006, 11:52 AM
Oh I'm ashamed. I totally forgot about my anodes! One more thing I've added. I think the new SS boats have one on the drive shaft and one on the rudder. Anyone know if there are more and where?