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View Full Version : Around/On the water habits


jraben8
07-18-2006, 02:11 PM
Ric has made me think of compiling a list of habits that I practice when I'm on or around the water. This thought originally started when a friend asked me to help him since he is new to boat ownership (I see a real opportunity to train a boat owner to operate the way I/we think it should be done. There are so many little things to think of and I know that I can't remember to document all of them for him. So please help me to create a cliff notes version of what comes naturally for us.

When we feel that it is generally complete I'll be responsible for creating a concise document for the FAQ section.

Please let your thoughts fly...

Or if I have completely missed something that has already been done like this, let me know, I'm not trying to waste anyone's time.

BrianM
07-18-2006, 02:19 PM
Lots of sunscreen and a nice wide brimmed hat. Bimini up 100% of the time.

yzwiley
07-18-2006, 02:31 PM
Always inform the ladies that clothing is optional.

bobbyB
07-18-2006, 02:34 PM
If I pull the boat any long distance, I always feel each wheel hub to see if any are getting hot every time I have to stop for gas, food, bathroom, beer........ I don't want to find out about a wheel bearing going out along some deserted road.

sanjuan23
07-18-2006, 02:38 PM
Take your shoes off! You'll thank someone later!

east tx skier
07-18-2006, 02:42 PM
When I get to the launch area, I get out and turn on the blower before I do anything else. It runs while we load gear, put the top up, remove the gunnel strap, etc. All of this is done before we go near the ramp. People who tend to their boat while they sit on the ramp drive me nuts. By the time we get back there, the blower has had time to do its job and we can spend as little time on the ramp as possible.

Jwhitsett1129
07-18-2006, 02:46 PM
Make sure to carry some form of currency, i.e. beer, food, women (kidding), or cash to pay some nice individual back in case you have to get a tow in.

#47of100TeamMC
07-18-2006, 02:48 PM
As important as it is to remove the hull plug after each use, as to not let water sit destroying the steering cable and other things. It's Equally important to remember to re-insert the plug before launching the boat. Throw it on the drivers seat, connect it to the keys. Or what ever else helps you remember.

justinlkgb
07-18-2006, 02:53 PM
Ladies= Must have
Sunscreen at least 30 I prefer 50 spf
Cooler with plenty of ice, beer for sunset and after( usually just me;the driver)
Refreshments other that alcohol
Towels
First aid kit
DONT FORGET THE GOLDEN RULE,
HAVE A GOOD TIME I'm sure thats why we all have chosen a MC
Wipe it down at the end of every day, wash/wax at LEAST once a month. You don't want to be "That Guy"
Buddies to help pay for fuel ; Women should always be able to ride for free.

east tx skier
07-18-2006, 03:17 PM
As important as it is to remove the hull plug after each use, as to not let water sit destroying the steering cable and other things. It's Equally important to remember to re-insert the plug before launching the boat. Throw it on the drivers seat, connect it to the keys. Or what ever else helps you remember.

I'd add to this to find something to use to prop up your motorbox about 4" when you put the boat up so air can circulate.

LakePirate
07-18-2006, 03:22 PM
I'd add to this to find something to use to prop up your motorbox about 4" when you put the boat up so air can circulate.


This could go bad in so many ways.

I will pass.

slink976
07-18-2006, 03:22 PM
Gas donations for the owner of the boat!!!!
And you still should help clean the boat!!!!

TMCNo1
07-18-2006, 03:32 PM
Everyone understands the rules, check to be sure you have done and got everything twice, then do it again!

east tx skier
07-18-2006, 03:34 PM
This could go bad in so many ways.

I will pass.

As will I. You gotta stop setting yourself up like this. :D

jeverett
07-18-2006, 03:34 PM
When I get to the launch area, I get out and turn on the blower before I do anything else. It runs while we load gear, put the top up, remove the gunnel strap, etc. All of this is done before we go near the ramp. People who tend to their boat while they sit on the ramp drive me nuts. By the time we get back there, the blower has had time to do its job and we can spend as little time on the ramp as possible.

Cheers to that eastie nothing is more aggrevating than a Wally loading his gear on the ramp and takn' 45 min. I load and prep in the parking lot away were I am not going to be in anyones way so that when I get to the ramp it only takes us a minute or so.

LakePirate
07-18-2006, 03:39 PM
As will I. You gotta stop setting yourself up like this. :D


Exactly :rolleyes:

WTRSK1R
07-18-2006, 03:43 PM
Once you are on the water, remember that EVERYONE has a right to be there. If you are not pulling anyone or anything, respect everyone else who is and do not power in front or behind them. Cutting across someones wake while they are towing is just as dangerous as cutting in front of them. In either case, you are putting the person behind the boat at risk. Drop the throttle, let them pass, and then when safely by proceed on your way. :)

chudson
07-18-2006, 03:54 PM
I am not sure if this was a state law or a rule set up on the lake we use to be on but it went "all boats should travel in a counter-clockwise direction" and it's something we have always tried to do. And it brings some order to the water instead of a tubing zig-zag free for all you see somtimes.

yzwiley
07-18-2006, 05:43 PM
Cheers to that eastie nothing is more aggrevating than a Wally loading his gear on the ramp and takn' 45 min. I load and prep in the parking lot away were I am not going to be in anyones way so that when I get to the ramp it only takes us a minute or so.

What's even better is when they tie their boat up to the dock right where they dumped it in, thus blocking anyone from using that lane to launch or load their boat. And of course this is all happening while twenty vehicles are in line for the ramp. Some people have absolutely no clue of what consideration is.

shepherd
07-18-2006, 05:58 PM
Take your shoes off! You'll thank someone later!

But bring your shoes with you. That's a habit I developed early in my boating life after I had to hike back to the car/ramp/wherever after the boat broke down. :mad: Fortunately, that hasn't happened lately and never in the Mastercraft.

jraben8
07-18-2006, 06:04 PM
I'm throwing my own personal comments into the list that I'm making for him:

Remember, these vehicles move and react differently than a car. Not as fast, not as precise, and there is no brake so you really have to plan ahead. Normally, the slower you go the less trouble you can get into.

wakebroad
07-18-2006, 06:45 PM
We were told to stay 50 feet away from other boats (although, on Saturday we had many people come within 10-20 feet from us, almost got ran over by some jetskis).

Another good tip: Use 1/2 vinegar and 1/2 distilled water instead of buying boat cleaner.

One more: We cover our speakers and lights on the tower with knee high panty hose when towing. Keeps off the bug guts.

Rixter_69
07-18-2006, 06:55 PM
<snip>

One more: We cover our speakers and lights on the tower with knee high panty hose when towing. Keeps off the bug guts.


This is an awesome tip, I was actually looking into having custom covers made up, because I'm tired of scraping bugs off!

Although now my wife is gonna wonder what happened to all of her panty hose....:firejump:

SkiDog
07-18-2006, 07:09 PM
Always inform the ladies that clothing is optional.

Thats right! You never know when you'll be called up to star in one of Skidog's:D :cool: Girls Gone Wild Vid's!

milkmania
07-18-2006, 07:18 PM
One more: We cover our speakers and lights on the tower with knee high panty hose when towing.
I want to touch this!
but, I'm scaredhttp://deephousepage.com/smilies/outtahere.gif

RobertT
07-19-2006, 12:33 AM
Nothing feels better than doing the right thing. When you are on a lake full of wallys, and you are going close to a boater getting ready to pull somebody up.....


wait


Stop, watch, enjoy, and be respectful. I do this all the time, and actually try to put myself between the skier/wakeboarder/etc and traffic to protect them.

Once they pull them up, I have no problem cruising by at speed, but stopping and letting them pull their rider up without a huge wake is a matter of courtesy and respect.

Showing respect always feels good.

The big smile and wave you get from a fellow boater when they finally realize what you did is always worth it.

TMCNo1
07-19-2006, 10:42 AM
I'd add to this to find something to use to prop up your motorbox about 4" when you put the boat up so air can circulate.

And the little mice that power the boat can breathe and get some relief from the heat after a good workout on the lake!:eek:

TMCNo1
07-19-2006, 10:53 AM
One more: We cover our speakers and lights on the tower with knee high panty hose when towing. Keeps off the bug guts.



Must be a real short person for "Knee High Panty Hose.:uglyhamme I bet every time they cut the wind it blows sand in their shoes!
Bloomer Crickets can be a real pain when towing! A good place to use bikini tops too!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

barefoot
07-24-2006, 10:59 AM
One habit Iíve always appreciated boaters to do is to ideal down before you make a turn to pick up a fallen skier. That way you donít send a roller down the entire lake.

Jwhitsett1129
07-24-2006, 11:38 AM
Unless some jacka*s is bearing down on my skier I always approach them at idle. Not only does it keep the water smooth but prevents a tired/dazed skier from getting hammered by a series of large waves...they seem to appreciate it.