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Tryin-again
07-18-2006, 01:52 PM
We ar gonna install a radio - we got one with the remote...

We think that the "dash" above the storage/seat at the front of the 190 would be the best place to mount the remote so passenger can mess with the radion, etc...

But we would have to drill the gelcoat/fiberglass there..... is there any secrets to this - I heard that the gelcoat chips and spiders away while drilling ...... should I not put it there?...


We do have the option of putting the remote to the right of the steering wheel on the same metal plate that holds the Nav light switch.. that would be simple although only accessable tto the driver (could be a good thing -LOL)


Any comments would be appreciated......

beef
07-18-2006, 02:03 PM
If you are drilling small holes (< 1/2"), use a standard drill, but drill in reverse until the gel coat has been pierced. After the hole is drilled, use a bit a couple sizes larger (in reverse) to chamfer the gel coat edge. This will help prevent future cracks.

If drilling a larger hole, either use a standard hole saw in reverse, or get a good carbide grit hole saw without teeth.

I've used both methods successfully, with no cracking. Have fun!

Tryin-again
07-18-2006, 02:06 PM
Thanks - thats what I figured might work - but figured I better ask first..

Ric
07-18-2006, 02:28 PM
the beef method is good
or you can grind a negative on the tip of your drill so that the gelcoat doesn't crack.

rektek
07-21-2006, 02:54 AM
how big is the hole to be cut ?
sharp [new] hole saw, pre-drill the pilot hole to prevent skating of the hole saw, my experience with MC gelcoat has no cracking and cuts very smooth. chamfer holes are nice but probably not needed for a non stress area.

want perfect holes ? check out rotabroach cutters, leaves you with a hole that looks milled, once you use these you'll never use a drill bit again for larger holes.

Jeff

Tryin-again
08-10-2006, 04:39 PM
Just got the remote in the 1st was faulty..

Question: In the following picture - which is the best spot for a novice to drill??

It's a 3 1/4" hole kind of spooks me.. Also The next picture - is this the type of hole saw ya'll would use?

Thanks for any help - I am drilling tonight "pray for my boat"..

beef
08-10-2006, 05:41 PM
Hey Tryin,

That's exactly the type of hole saw I've used to install heater tube outlets. Should work fine. Just make sure to drill in reverse until through the gel coat to eliminate chipping.

I would vote for the location in the face of the dash (the one to the left). If for no other reason, I think it will look better than facing up near the gauges.

Diesel
08-10-2006, 05:43 PM
Why not down in that plate by the igniton switch. It does not look like there is anything there and if you want to remove it you can just get a replacement plate from MC or make a new one. If you want it closer to the passengers just rotate the plate 180 degrees(assuming it's symetrical) so the igniton switch is on the driver's side.

Since I am always changing things I like to drill in easily replacable panels vs. gel coat.

Good luck and post up some more pics when done. :)

Tryin-again
08-10-2006, 05:45 PM
On placement -That's kind of what I was thinking - It might be easier to drill also there...

Thanks........

Tryin-again
08-10-2006, 05:46 PM
Diesel _ I was contemplating the same - for the same reasons.

Tryin-again
08-10-2006, 05:50 PM
Down Shot.....

JimN
08-10-2006, 06:09 PM
I usually use a countersink for the holes after they're drilled. Also, for cutting a rectangular hole for head units, I have an air reciprocating saw (available for about $20 at Harbor Freight) and then I use blue masking tape on the gelcoat around the future hole, wide enough that it goes outside by at least one tape width and keeps the foot of any saw used frrm scratching the gel coat. On the occasions where I use a jig saw, I have a Bosch and I tape the bottom of the foot so that even if it comes in coatact with the gel outside of the tape outline, it won't scratch it.

When I cut the rectangle, I mark it out based on the shell that comes with the head unit, drill a hole at two opposite corners slightly larger dia than the blade width and cut just to the outside of the line, basically making two L shaped cuts. Then, I file or sand where needed to straighten the long sides and square up the corners.

Any time I cut a circle, I make sure the pilot bit is longer than normal so it won't grab and walk when the teeth first come in contact with the surface, even after starting in reverse.

jimmer2880
08-10-2006, 07:59 PM
I usually use a countersink for the holes after they're drilled. Also, for cutting a rectangular hole for head units, I have an air reciprocating saw (available for about $20 at Harbor Freight) and then I use blue masking tape on the gelcoat around the future hole, wide enough that it goes outside by at least one tape width and keeps the foot of any saw used frrm scratching the gel coat. On the occasions where I use a jig saw, I have a Bosch a......

Jim, why do you use an air saw vs an electric? Is it soley due to it's lack of size?

JimN
08-10-2006, 09:08 PM
Manuverability, it's lighter, I can do this kind of thing on the water without worrying about becoming the load. Go to the Harbor Freight site and look for it and I think you'll see why I use it. Also, by using the blades made for it or cutting hacksaw blades to fit, the cut is a lot less aggressive and there's less tendency to chip the gelcoat. I did car audio and security for a long time and after cutting speaker holes, dashes and other car/boat parts for equipment installation, I guess I just prefer certain tools for specific jobs.

I bought my saw at Northern Industrial close to 20 years ago because it seemed like a better value at $50 than $198 for a Blue Point from Snap-On and the only thing mine lacks is the speed control knob, which can be handled by installing a small in-line valve, sold at just about all places that carry air tools.

Any bi-metal hacksaw blade will work for this saw, which is originally made for cutting auto body panels. If you can't find it by looking for "air reciprocating saw", try "body panel saw".

Tryin-again
08-10-2006, 09:51 PM
I pulled the plug! ......
I wwent ahead and drilled straight down on the dash... Below the Fuel gauge and DepthFinder... Measured off the edge so that it would match the cup holder on the other side..

It looks greatand actually works!...

Thanks for all your help.......:cool:

JohnnyB
08-13-2006, 09:55 PM
That's the same hole saw I used to cut my speaker holes. On the advice of a friend who builds airplanes for a hobby and does lots of fiberglass cutting, I used a 1/2 inch drill and ran the hole saw forward at a low RPM until I was through the gel-coat and then finished drilling/sawing "at speed". No chips using this method.

jimmer2880
08-14-2006, 07:05 PM
Manuverability, it's lighter, I can do this kind of thing on the water without worrying about becoming the load. Go to the Harbor Freight site and look for it and I think you'll see why I use it. Also, by using the blades made for it or cutting hacksaw blades to fit, the cut is a lot less aggressive and there's less tendency to chip the gelcoat. I did car audio and security for a long time and after cutting speaker holes, dashes and other car/boat parts for equipment installation, I guess I just prefer certain tools for specific jobs.

I bought my saw at Northern Industrial close to 20 years ago because it seemed like a better value at $50 than $198 for a Blue Point from Snap-On and the only thing mine lacks is the speed control knob, which can be handled by installing a small in-line valve, sold at just about all places that carry air tools.

Any bi-metal hacksaw blade will work for this saw, which is originally made for cutting auto body panels. If you can't find it by looking for "air reciprocating saw", try "body panel saw".

Great. I'll have to add one to my growing pneumatic toy supplies. I figured there was a good reason.

H20skeefreek
08-14-2006, 08:40 PM
Down Shot.....
The good thing with this location is when the unit goes bad and you have to replace it and they don't make it anymore (yeah, it'll happen) You can just put another cup holder in it's place.

Tryin-again
08-14-2006, 09:37 PM
yea, thats what I told my boat partner...