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View Full Version : Prop Hit Trailer Prop Guard.


SoCalBrew
07-17-2006, 04:38 AM
I recently bought my first MC, a 1990 ProStar 190 with Powerslot (boat is amazing)... after boating for 30 some years with I/O's. Have been out about a dozen times, and have not had a single problem loading or unloading the boat on the trailer (1990 trailrite with pivoting bar)... until today. I was loading the boat on the trailer by myself, being conscience of not putting the trailer too deep (or shallow for that matter), and had a few waves push me into the trailer guide post (padded) when I was about half way onto the trailer. I eased the boat forward - and it seemed to center as I slid onto the slats, until it was seated in the V cradle at the front. At this point, I usually need to give it a little gas to get the boat far enough up on the trailer in order to engage the pivot bar (a piece of frustrating gear). I centered the wheel, and gave it gas, and heard my prop grind against the prop guard on the trailer. Ouch (embarrasing). I was a little bit to the left - where the waves had pushed me...

...here is my question, I thought the trailer guide posts were supposed to prevent this from happening???? How do I prevent this from happening again... is there anything wrong with my trailer? or my procedure?

I now need to replace my prop. I want to put exactly the same one on... was a three blade prop that supposedly came with the boat - any clues which one it is? It had amazing power, and was really smooth. Do I need a prop puller to remove the old one?

Should I be worried about the drive shaft? The prop wasn't stopped by the prop guard, all the blades hit the guard repeatedly, for the duration of about a second or less, and is just curled the edge of all three blades.

I appreciate any insight... I realize that my many years of experience with boating with I/O's has only translated so far with inboards, so for all intents and practical purposes... I'm a newbie, so please go easy.

Thanks,

Tom

Maristar210
07-17-2006, 06:58 AM
www.skidim.com for the prop. You did nothing wrong. The trailer posts are only rough guides and waves suck when your loading the boat. Only suggestion is to float it on rather than drive it on if that it possible.

Good luck, welcome and Nice boat.

Steve

Brent
07-17-2006, 07:08 AM
Don't get the original prop, the newer 4 blade props as well as the CNC'd 3 blade props are amazing & will make your boat perform even better!

Hedge your bets & have someone else around when loading on the trailer. they can winch the boat up before you give the final gas.

Prop puller is a good idea , take the nut off you may be lucky & be able to just pull the prop of by hand ,if not the puller is a must!

chudson
07-17-2006, 08:21 AM
Prop puller helps, do you have a friend that may have one? and the numbers for ordering a new prop are on the hub near where the shaft goes through the prop. Need a torque wrench too for tightening replacement prop look at the book for the ft lbs. setting, mine is 50 lbs. I think but yours may be different. Skidim is a good place to start as was said above for a new prop. http://www.skidim.com/

TMCNo1
07-17-2006, 09:05 AM
The Trailrite trailer you have may not be the exact same geometry as a factory 1990 Mastercraft trailer, causing the prop hitting the propguard problem and that aided by the wave problem.
Get yourself a new prop, of your choosing, take the old prop off, before or after and look on the hub for the Mfg, date of mfg., and the pitch, probably OJ and send it to them for repairs, then use it as a spare.
If the prop has been on the boat for several years, you will probably need a prop puller and sometimes the prop is still hard to get off. Do not remove the prop nut all the way off, just back it off several rounds, so when it does release it won't fall in the floor and bang on everything. If is refuses to pop off, saturate the shaft and hub with WD-40 and apply heat to the hub, to expand the hub on the shaft and help release it.

Evan Jones
07-17-2006, 09:21 AM
Your guide bars may have bent out over the years. How much space do you have at the rear of the boat between the rubrail and the guide bars? If it's anything over an inch or two, I would adjust them a little closer.

Upper Michigan Prostar190
07-17-2006, 10:27 AM
Sorry to hear of your troubles. :(

Now for the fix:
I totally agree with the idea of NOT getting an exact replacement prop. I have a 1991 Prostar with a powerslot and upgraded to a ACME brand 4 blade CNC prop last year. Call Bill Weeks at ACME. www.acmepropellers.com 1-888-661-ACME and tell him what you have and he will hook you up with the right prop for you boat. He was very informative and knowledgeable.

A prop puller is almost a must. ACME sells those too. I did alot of research last year on this, and I am really happy with what the ACME did for me. Greatly reduced vibration, improved hole shot, holds speed better. changed the entire handling of the boat for the better. much smoother.

Let us know what you decide!

SoCalBrew
07-17-2006, 11:23 AM
In standing back and looking at the trailer, it looks as if the left side trailer guide post may be bent out a bit. This post seems so solid that it doesn't seem possible that it was/could moved... I might take it down to trailerite and see if they can check it out and adjust it. I wonder if they have a way of telling how far over the guides need to be... or if it is all guess work.

Should I be concerned about the drive shaft? or should I just put a new prop on and see how it reacts?

I agree about having someone else around when I load the boat... that'll be the last time I load the boat by myself.

As far as getting better performance out of a prop... wow, that would be hard to believe. I've never had a boat accelerate faster... including outboards... Had a friend literally roll out of the boat when we slammed down the throttle for the first time... Smile didn't leave either of our faces for a week. Assuming the powerslot had a lot to do with that.

Thanks for your reply's. Again, I really appreciate the insight and experience of this group!

SoCalBrew
07-17-2006, 11:33 AM
Steve (Maristar210), I would prefer to float the boat on... but seem to have a problem getting the boat hi enough on the trailer in order to make the pivot arm work, which is why I ended up giving it gas... have any clever ways to get the pivot arm attached while floating it in?

Thanks for the welcome!

Tom

thijs
07-17-2006, 12:00 PM
I am relatively new to the inboard boat world. I am used to the i/o's that we used to have.

We now have a 94PS205 with Mastercraft tandem trailer. Do I have to worry about the same thing, or does this mishap mostly have to do with SoCalBrew's trailer???

kycat2007
07-17-2006, 01:25 PM
i agree with the four blade prop it worked wonders on my old Tristar. you may want to stop buy a MC dealer and ask them to pop the prop off. It takes them just a few to pop it for you and not much $. You can use the search button to find an extensive thread on how some have had trouble getting the prop to pop off. Some have said to heat the prop while puller is installed and get the tips warm to the touch. It helps the brass disengage.

Good luck

Upper Michigan Prostar190
07-17-2006, 01:47 PM
Is all that heating/cooling good for the strength of the prop? you know the metallugic properties. will that affect the temper/hardness of hte metal to be heating and cooling the prop like that?
:confused: :confused:

BrianM
07-17-2006, 01:48 PM
Put an Acme #541 or an OJ XMP 13x12 on that boat. Both are 3 blade CNCd props. I had an Acme #541 on my '88 Prostar which is the same boat as your '90 and it made huge improvements in overall performance especially hole shot and silky smoothness. Once you get it on you will be glad you mangled the other one.

As for the stupid bar in the front of your trailer. There is no easy way. Just take it to a trailer shop and have them replace it with a boat buddy system.
FAQ on this mod here. (http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=112627&postcount=17)
After Picture (http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=112628&postcount=18)

TMCNo1
07-17-2006, 05:44 PM
Is all that heating/cooling good for the strength of the prop? you know the metallugic properties. will that affect the temper/hardness of hte metal to be heating and cooling the prop like that?
:confused: :confused:


By using a heat gun on low or medium heat, it will not get hot enough to damage the prop. High heat from a hair dry will work too. If you took a propane or other type of gas torch, I could see someone getting it too hot. Wouldn't hurt any more than leaving a boat outside in below freezing to sub-zero temps during the winter.
After having a prop puller on a prop for up to 8 hours, as tight as I could get it and they still would not pop, so I've used heat several times with no adverse effects.

thijs
07-18-2006, 10:24 AM
I am really quite worried, can someone let me know if I am at risk hitting my prop on my 1994 PS205 with my tandem Mastercraft trailer???
(Going out this weekend and would hate the irony of the same thing happening to me)

Kevin 89MC
07-18-2006, 11:18 PM
Great to see another "classic ProStar" on board! I'm pretty sure that my prop wouldn't hit the guard on my factory MC trailer, but ICBW.
I got rid of my "bar" and put on a Boat Buddy. If it's similar to yours, you'll appreciate the convenience. You can switch to a standard roller if you don't like the Boat Buddy, it does have it's disadvantages. I admire you for loading/unloading by yourself with the bar - I was never that brave.
These boats do have a great hole shot - even my 1:1 with the original 3 blade is plenty for me. I upgraded to a 4 blade, but not CNC (I think) and even that was an improvement.
Welcome, and good luck!
Kevin

erkoehler
07-18-2006, 11:25 PM
I am really quite worried, can someone let me know if I am at risk hitting my prop on my 1994 PS205 with my tandem Mastercraft trailer???
(Going out this weekend and would hate the irony of the same thing happening to me)


Obviously there is always a chance that if you mess up the loading process you can ding the prop, but with the factory trailer and the guide posts set properly, you should not have an issue with dinging the prop on the prop gaurd.

jimmer2880
07-19-2006, 06:58 AM
maybe someone has already suggested this, but on my MC trailer, the guide posts are adjustable by loosening some stop bolts, and rotating the post. Perhaps it's time for yours to be adjusted.

SoCalBrew
07-20-2006, 08:17 PM
jimmer - my trailer appears to be manufactured by trailrite... have the trailers that Mastercraft been using ever been manufactured by trailrite?? I appears that mine have been welded on - at least the posts are to the base. Are you saying that the base itself is adjustable?? Or do I just have a different trailer?

Thanks, Tom

SoCalBrew
07-20-2006, 08:19 PM
Brian M, I noticed that your prop recommendations were the ones that you use on your boat... but you do not have a powerslot... shouldn't there be a different size prop for a powerslot boat?

Thanks, Tom

2000205V
04-22-2007, 11:45 PM
jimmer - my trailer appears to be manufactured by trailrite... have the trailers that Mastercraft been using ever been manufactured by trailrite?? I appears that mine have been welded on - at least the posts are to the base. Are you saying that the base itself is adjustable?? Or do I just have a different trailer?

Thanks, Tom


I assume the original owner didn't buy the expensive Mastercraft trailer and went with the generic manufacturer.

When I was buying my boat the MC trailer was $7200, where as a Shorlander that was almost identical was $5100. Dealer actually recomended the Shorelander because of price.

On your trailer it probably just needs some adjusting on the guide posts to ensure the prop doesn't hit. You may have to get the tape measure out to confirm.

SoCalBrew
04-23-2007, 11:46 AM
From what I understand, in the 90's, the trailrite trailer was what MC used. (my boat is '90) and then later on, MC started manufacturing their own trailers. Here is a link to what trailer I have:

http://www.trailrite.com/tournament.htm

On this trailer, the guideposts are welded on tight... no moving unless you break the weld. In talking with the guys at MCT trailers, it is not likely that I bent the post, and I just hit an unlucky wave/angle that would have resulted in a ding, even if my guide post was in a bit farther. I've since studied how to better land the boat... and I should be less likely to have problems...

I did recently purchased and additional MC - the X-15 - and I will admit, that THAT trailer is set up much better... the posts are more narrow, but they are more flexible. BUT, by the time you get the boat in far enough, they are stiff enough to keep you rolling straight. The issue again, is getting the boat up far enough on the trailer, so that you have enough tongue weight for good towing.

So far so good!

Tom

Sodar
04-23-2007, 11:52 AM
From what I understand, in the 90's, the trailrite trailer was what MC used. (my boat is '90) and then later on, MC started manufacturing their own trailers. Here is a link to what trailer I have:

http://www.trailrite.com/tournament.htm



MC has been making trailers for about as long as they have been making boats. Sometimes, the CA dealerships, dump MC's on Trailer-Rites, Pacifics or VM's, because they are a little less $$$$. We had an '86 MC and trailer, that had no prop guard at all, making it impossible to dink the prop on it, but very hairy putting the boat in the driveway or pulling out of a gas station!! :)

SoCalBrew
04-23-2007, 12:04 PM
Yikes... I don't know what I'd do without my prop guard with rollers on it. As much as a try, I hit the rollers at least once a month... not hard, but enough to make me wonder if I'd hit the prop if it wasn't there.

As far as the trailrite - guess I got bad info from an old dealer. But, I actually like the trailer a lot.

Tom

Prostar Rich
04-23-2007, 12:22 PM
I have the exact year and model boat 1990 MC Prostar 190 with the MC trailer. The design of the MC trailer on this year boat IMHO is poor. There are many owners who have damged the keel of the boat with this trailer. What I did is to carpet the very first rubber pad that makes contact with the boat. Second is that when loading the boat I drive it up on the trailer just far enough so that I can attach the winch strap and winch it up the rest of the way. I have had no damge since. It would be very difficult to ding a prop on the MC trailer. You would have to drive the boat up way to far which in turn the bow would be riding up over the boat buddy system.

HTH,
Prostar Rich

uawaterskier
04-23-2007, 03:24 PM
dont feel so bad. Our brand new 07 boat got the prop into the trailer guard as well. Lucky for us it wasnt very bad at all and is at a prop shop being repaired as we speak

edit*its the single axle MC trailer as well