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ZZMCFOOT
07-12-2006, 08:39 PM
Does anyone have any suggestions on the best way to teach someone the deepwater slalom start ? Are there any advantages/techniques to teaching it off the boom?

Mag_Red
07-12-2006, 08:52 PM
Knees to the chest and hang on.Don't try and pull yourself up, let the boat do it. :wavey:

PendO
07-12-2006, 09:00 PM
Does anyone have any suggestions on the best way to teach someone the deepwater slalom start ? Are there any advantages/techniques to teaching it off the boom?

What is the age and size of the person ... and also, what is their athletic ability ... I'm teaching my wife off the boom, hoping to spare some frustration.

ZZMCFOOT
07-12-2006, 09:08 PM
I'm trying to teach my wife too. Over the years she has tried many times behind the boat so I'd like to try and make it easier too. I just wasn't sure if there are any advantages to using the boom and how to go about it.

Mag_Red
07-12-2006, 09:19 PM
The boom is easier as they just hold onto it, but I did notice, that with my 209, the spray off the side hits the ski and makes it very unstable. I didn't realize this until I put the ski on and tried to show some one what they were doing wrong:D

ZZMCFOOT
07-12-2006, 09:25 PM
I have an extension with for my boom so that might help with the spray. Should we only work right off the boom or can we add a handle/rope as she progresses.

Rixter_69
07-12-2006, 09:28 PM
The boom certainly helps beginners to gain confidence, make sure they start on the holding the boom as far out as possible and if they fall tell them to LET GO. Start with a gentle pull on the throttle, you don't need to go more than 15-17mph to get them on the water.

Once they have confidence on the boom (or if you don't have a boom) a "DEEP-V" handle helps to keep the ski straight while they are getting up and to build confidence. Knees to the chest, head up and arms straight are the keys to success. Again driver skill here is important because you don't want to rip the handle outta their hands. :D

If you don't have a DEEP-V, you may also consider having them start on two skis, then drop a ski to get the feel of the single slalom ski on the water.

Also for a deep water start a very useful tip is if they are right foot back to make sure they keep the rope to the left of the ski, left foot back, keep it to the right of the ski. Have them pick a point on the sky (clouds, tower, whatever) and keep their head up. (The body usually goes where you look). I never like the one foot out technique, although there are people that say it works.

Sorry for the long post, but I've spent a lot of time young (and old) getting skiers up for the first time, mainly to keep the sport of slalom alive (anybody can WAKEBOARD :dance: ). Hope it helps - good luck and remember....LOTS of patience....

Rixter_69
07-12-2006, 09:32 PM
I have an extension with for my boom so that might help with the spray. Should we only work right off the boom or can we add a handle/rope as she progresses.

I would have them hold the boom, it's more stable. Ya gotta be careful with the rope handle off the boom, cuz if the skier cuts to the right (assuming your boom is off to the left like it is on my X9), then you'll be visiting your nearest gelcoat repairman).

Cheers,

ZZMCFOOT
07-12-2006, 09:39 PM
Thanks for the help!

billr
07-12-2006, 10:06 PM
We have a deep V handle, and it works great. Biggest problem most people have is trying to stand up too soon. Let the boat pull you up, even if you have to stay in a squatting position a little longer.

JohnE
07-13-2006, 06:58 AM
I was taught and have taught many people the deepwater start by "dragging" the rear foot and then putting it in the toe loop after you get up. I'm thinking not everyone does that with the reference to knees to the chest.?

billr
07-13-2006, 09:46 AM
JohnE: I have done the same thing, and prefer to drag my back foot.. But with the rear boot that almost impossible. That's the main reason we have a V-rope.

shepherd
07-13-2006, 09:50 AM
We have a deep V handle, and it works great. Biggest problem most people have is trying to stand up too soon. Let the boat pull you up, even if you have to stay in a squatting position a little longer.

Exactly what I was thinking. The deep V handle works great. And tell the skier to stay crouched down as long as she can until the ski is up on the surface. Then stand up.

Upper Michigan Prostar190
07-13-2006, 09:52 AM
There was a thread on this last year I started when I was learning to deep start on one ski. LOTS of helpful information on it from the fine folks here. I did it, and you can too!:) Hang in there and keep trying!

peason
07-13-2006, 12:32 PM
I have an extension with for my boom so that might help with the spray. Should we only work right off the boom or can we add a handle/rope as she progresses.

Yes, I would begin with directly on the boom. As she gets the feel of it, I would add a 5 foot section w/handle. My boom has an extension also and we still get a spray off the boat as we pull a skier up- but with more speed it gets behind the skier.

Good luck and take pic's and post them - that is if your wife will let you!

east tx skier
07-13-2006, 12:40 PM
I'm late on this and, as a result, will repeat what others have said.

As for instruction, we try to keep it simple.
(1) Knees bent (to the chest).
(2) Arms straight.
(3) Ski tip out of the water.
(4) Let the boat pull you up.

As for equipment, we used to always use an old, flat bottom, wooden ski with a long metal fin. These still make for easier ups, but there is something better.

Most companies make these huge slalom skis that resemble pontoons. They are great for getting up on, but not much once for easy riding once the person is up in our experience. Still a good piece of equipment to have.

Can't say enough good things about the deep-v handle. Get one. They're great. Makes keeping the ski tip out of the water and between skier and boat so much easier.

We've never used a boom as we don't own one. I'm pretty much against dropping skis as it doesn't teach the rider anything about getting up even though they may get used to riding a slalom). Plus, you leave equipment in the water and I just don't want anyone to hit it (even if it's got an orange floatie on it).

chudson
07-13-2006, 05:00 PM
I have always drug a foot (RFF) it seemed so easy that way for me then I bought ski with a rear boot cause all the big boys in the tours had them. Then I found that my left knee was dragging real hard in the wall of water coming off the left side of the ski and I also had to lean back farther, liked to strained my guts out trying to come up that way. Finally did it but I decieded the pain wasn't worth it so I got a rear toe for my ski. I also figured that maybe the big boys had those rear boots just so chumps like me would get the boot trying to be just like them big boys, who knows! Try dragin a foot with your chest on your foward knee coming up and stand up balancing on one leg for an instant while you put the back foot on the ski any where. Then when you feel comfortable slip the foot int the toe strap. Worked for me and just about everyone I taught.

atlps190
07-13-2006, 05:06 PM
If the person has some pretty good arm / upper body strength, you might want to try this....

When they're up skiing comfortably (on one ski) right behind the boat, gradually slow the boat down to the point that the skier is almost beginning to sink. Have the skier lean back and "resist" the pull with their shoulders, keeping the handle low and to their hips while really bending their knees. Then gradually speed back up to skiing speed. Try it a few times, and it should give the skier a feeling similar to the deep water start.

I did this drill with many summer camp students, and it seemed to help. We also had a "deep-v" handle, and that for sure was the best.

-T.

chudson
07-13-2006, 05:09 PM
Something else is yes the boom helps alot with the upward pull and balance. If the person hasn't slalomed yet try raising a ski out of the water and balancing on the other ski for a while then try kicking off a ski.

Brent
07-13-2006, 09:51 PM
My Daughter & a friend both learned deep water starts at McGinnis ski school this spring , They started on the boom both feet in, then went to the 5ft extesion then behind the boat. The one thing that made it click behind the boat for both was telling them to keep their knee's just below the surface of the water.

atlfootr
07-13-2006, 10:27 PM
The boom is easier as they just hold onto it, but I did notice, that with my 209, the spray off the side hits the ski and makes it very unstable. I didn't realize this until I put the ski on and tried to show some one what they were doing wrong:DI have an extension with for my boom so that might help with the spray. Should we only work right off the boom or can we add a handle/rope as she progresses.
I was just going to say that as well.
http://www.home.comcast.net/~lreinsma/

atlfootr
07-13-2006, 10:35 PM
I was just going to say, add a barefoot boom extenion as well.